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Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial  Lab: What You Should Know  Before You Go “All In”
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Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial Lab: What You Should Know Before You Go “All In”

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Training for a career in science begins with formal theoretical and practical instruction at an academic institution, often followed by advanced training and eventual employment also at an academic …

Training for a career in science begins with formal theoretical and practical instruction at an academic institution, often followed by advanced training and eventual employment also at an academic institution. This career path is one which has been historically taken by most scientists.
In recent years, increasing numbers of academic scientists are choosing commercial laboratories to pursue their research careers. This shift in career path is driven to a large degree by the eroding of financial support for academic scientists, as evidenced by the downward trend in the funding rate for grants submitted to the NIH, NSF, and private foundations. Perhaps the greatest challenge for an academic scientist contemplating a move to a commercial laboratory is to adjust their thinking of ‘doing science for science sake’ to ‘doing science for commercializing a product’.

This insightful Webinar will cover areas to be considered when making this career change, including the culture of the commercial laboratory working environment, career advancement, scientific recognition, mentoring, and availability of opportunities.

5 Key Take-Aways:

Similarities and difference between academic and commercial laboratory working environments
Suggestions on how to increase your autonomy and independence in conducting research at a commercial laboratory
How to ‘hedge your bets’ so that deadlines and milestones are reached
Balancing publishing and intellectual property generation
The difference in costs between academic and commercial laboratory research
Who Should Attend:

Any academic PI, scientist, post-doc, graduate student, technician contemplating a move from a university-based research laboratory to a commercial biotechnology or pharmaceutical development laboratory.

Published in: Education
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  • 1. Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial Lab: What You Should Know Before You Go “All In” Brought to you by Principal Investigators Association Presented by: John W. Ludlow, Ph.D.Live Webinar Thursday, January 17, 2013 at 2:00 PM EST For More Information visit http://bit.ly/LabCareer For More Information visit http://bit.ly/LabCareer Or Call 1-800-303-0129 ext.506 Or Call 1-800-303-0129 ext.506
  • 2. Thursday: January 17, 2013 2:00 PM EST | 11:00 AM PSTThis insightful Webinar will cover areas to be considered when making the careerchange from an academic setting to the commercial lab, including the culture of thecommercial laboratory working environment, career advancement, scientific recognition,mentoring, and availability of opportunities. 55Key Take-Aways: Key Take-Aways: •Similarities and differences between academic and commercial •Similarities and differences between academic and commercial laboratory working environments laboratory working environments •Suggestions on how to increase your autonomy and independence •Suggestions on how to increase your autonomy and independence in conducting research at aacommercial laboratory in conducting research at commercial laboratory •How to ‘hedge your bets’ so that deadlines and milestones are •How to ‘hedge your bets’ so that deadlines and milestones are reached reached •Balancing publishing and intellectual property generation •Balancing publishing and intellectual property generation •The difference in costs between academic and commercial •The difference in costs between academic and commercial laboratory research laboratory research Attend the Live Webinar and receive a free recording in CD-ROM, MP4 or PDF Transcript.. For More Information visit http://bit.ly/LabCareer For More Information visit http://bit.ly/LabCareer
  • 3. Making the Move from the Academic to the Commercial Lab: What You Should Know Before You Go “All In” • Erosion of academic research support contributes to a career change to commercial laboratories • Desire to pursue science having a more direct application • Career advancement • Political environment • Compensation considerations • Time and Effort
  • 4. Presentation Goals1. Points to consider when contemplating a change from an academic to a commercial science career2. Similarities and differences between the two laboratory settings3. Career advancement in the commercial sector Areas of emphasis are highlighted in yellow
  • 5. Presentation Outline1. Introduction • Current landscape • Large vs. small companies • Contract research2. The two cultures • Academic • Commercial3. Making the move • Decision • Action4. Advancement after the move5. Suggested resources6. Summary and closing remarks
  • 6. Current LandscapeThe Framework• Biotechnology leverages our understanding of the natural sciences to create novel solutions• Biotechnology is grounded in the pure biological sciences of genetics, microbiology, animal cell cultures, molecular biology, embryology and cell biology• The foundation of biotechnology is based in our understanding of cells, proteins and genes• The discoveries of biotechnology are intimately entwined in the industry sectors for development in agricultural biotechnology, biofuels, biomanufacturing, human health, nanobiotechnology, vaccines, tissue engineering and regenerative medicine
  • 7. Current LandscapeWe have all heard about the challenges of changing career paths ‘in this environment’• Unemployment among scientists tends to be less than in other fields• Opportunities tend to be more available the closer you are to the bench• There are geographical differences in opportunities for those wanting to move to a commercial laboratory• Research and development dollars in commercial laboratories are not at the levels they were in the past• The landscape is dynamic
  • 8. Commercial Biotechnology Labs• Part of a not-yet profitable company to conduct research and development studies for a repeatable and scalable business model• Perform fee-for-service analysis for healthcare, environmental, and veterinary organizations• A division in a profitable company to carry out research and development studies for pipeline products• A service company providing biological products for the academic and other private sector laboratories
  • 9. Large Companies• May be publicly traded or privately held• May have multiple geographic locations, holdings• Not always easily defined by number of employees• Often have multiple products on the market, or many services which they offer• Usually have multiple divisions• Clear delineation of responsibilities
  • 10. Small Companies• May be publicly traded or privately held, often privately held• Usually have a single location• At the low end, less than 10 employees• Often have a few select products on the market, or limited services which they offer• Startup companies fall in this category• Employees often wear ‘multiple hats’
  • 11. Startup Companies• In the phase of research and development for markets• High risk / high reward profile• Scalable• Value often based on IP• Founder, Venture Capitol, Angel Investor funded
  • 12. Startup Company Considerations• How secure is the IP• What are the plans for growth• Track record of the founders• Current financing• Burn rate• Projected runway to cash extinguishment• Plan for continued funding• Recognize that many startups fail
  • 13. Contract Research Organization (CRO)• Offers fee-for-services support primarily to manufactures of medicinal products and biotechnology companies• Current Good Laboratory Practices (cGMP) compliant• Follow Standard Operating Procedures (SOP) for work performed• Provide quality assured documentation to client
  • 14. Contract Research Organization (CRO)Depending on the organization, services provided may include,but are not necessarily limited to:•Laboratory analysis•Experimental design•Product development•Manufacturing•Pre-clinical studies•Clinical trial management•Project management•Data entry and statistical analysis•Institutional review board (IRB) approval•Document preparation and submission to regulatory agencies
  • 15. Contract Research Companies• May be large or small• Defined scope of work• Defined deliverables• Timelines may be rolling• While no true ‘ownership’ of the projects, opportunities to work in a variety of areas
  • 16. The Two CulturesAcademic • Knowledge for knowledge sakeCommercial • Having profit as the chief aim
  • 17. The Two Cultures Academic CompanyFreedom to choose pursuit Defined pursuit Intellectual curiosity Product developmentPrestige of independence Corporate identity Publications Patents Grants Corporate support Build a group Build or join a group Soft timelines Fixed timelines Success is determined by finances
  • 18. The Two CulturesFreedom to choose pursuit vs. defined pursuit • Arguably one of the most critical differences to consider when deciding to move from academics to a commercial setting • Can you get excited about projects that you did not design? • Do you see an opportunity to ‘make it your own’?
  • 19. The Two CulturesIntellectual curiosity vs. product development • Ideally the project will satisfy both • Development tends to be more predictable • Do you see an opportunity to pursue curiosities?
  • 20. Publications• Publications are still important for validating company’s technology• Need to be vetted by legal before submission• Timing may be linked to milestones and press releases• Same considerations for poster and podium presentations
  • 21. Intellectual Property (Patents)• Intellectual property is defined as creations of the mind for which property rights are recognized under intellectual property law• Owners of IP are granted certain exclusive rights• A patent by itself does not grant the inventor the right to commercialize the protected technology; a patent grants the right to exclude others from commercializing it• Continuing to secure additional IP, as well as leverage existing IP, are critical to a company’s success• Ultimately, IP needs to be translated into a revenue-generating product for a company to enjoy some degree of financial stability
  • 22. Decision Making• Confirm there is a viable market• Is there sufficient capitalization• What are the competitive advantages• Will there be competition with industry leaders• Is the technology niche too small• Assess the founding team stability• Is the growth pace too rapid• Have trust in the sources utilized to answers these questions
  • 23. AttitudeEntrepreneurial spirit Balance competing prioritiesRisk / Reward tolerance
  • 24. Taking Action• Are there any conflict of interest issues to be addressed?• Determining what belongs to you and what belongs to the academic institution• Release from your academic responsibilities• Notifying granting agencies of your academic departure
  • 25. Advancement• Rank initially assessed by length of service• Responsibilities similar to academic positions, with different nomenclature• Success rate for deliverables• Organization size dictates advancement opportunities• Local biotechnology environment
  • 26. Suggested Resources• Colleagues who have ties to industry• Faculty at colleges and universities with biotechnology programs• University Technology Transfer Office• State Biotechnology Office• Networking events at scientific meetings• Industrial internship, fellowship, apprenticeship• Visiting a biotechnology company
  • 27. Summary and Closing Remarks • Milestone driven • Product development or service provider • Patents • Commercial success
  • 28. NSF Grant Application Mentor: An Educational How-to Series This unique 217-page, how-to manual coaches you on how to optimally prepare the vital components of your NSF grant application one section at a time! Includes all 2013 updates and revisions required to meet NSF’s revised version of the NSF Proposal & Award Policies & Procedures Guide (PAPPG) Order Now Learn More Or Call 1-800-303-0129 ext. 506 The NSF Grant Application Mentor: An Educational How-to Manual, 2013 Edition The NSF Grant Application Mentor: An Educational How-to Manual, 2013 Edition includes 77 unique sections. Each section instructs on a separate, important aspect of includes unique sections. Each section instructs on a separate, important aspect of the NSF grant application process. These include: the NSF grant application process. These include: Section 1: Preparation—What Every Researcher Should Know Before You Start Section 1: Preparation—What Every Researcher Should Know Before You Start Applying Applying Section 2: Knowing Your Audience: Understand NSF’s Review Criteria and Reviewers Section 2: Knowing Your Audience: Understand NSF’s Review Criteria and Reviewers Section 3: Successfully Present Your Project and Your Individual Qualifications Section 3: Successfully Present Your Project and Your Individual Qualifications Section 4: How to Document Your Resources and Your Commitment to the Research Section 4: How to Document Your Resources and Your Commitment to the Research Community Community Section 5: Demonstrating the Significance of Your Research Topic Section 5: Demonstrating the Significance of Your Research Topic Section 6: NSF Special Considerations: Reporting and Compliance Essentials for Section 6: NSF Special Considerations: Reporting and Compliance Essentials for Human Subjects and Animals Human Subjects and Animals Section 7: The NSF Review Process: Tactics for Submitting aa Winning Proposal Section 7: The NSF Review Process: Tactics for Submitting Winning Proposal
  • 29. Introducing Science Pro FREE RESOURCE Insider The only Free Monthly eNewsletter focused on providing best practices on obtaining grant funding, lab management, career advice and much more! Inside P astIssues: ast Inside P Issues: •Communicating Data-Rich Results ––K eySuccess Factors ey •Communicating Data-Rich Results K Success Factors •H owto L everageConnections for P rivateFunding ow •H to L everage Connections for P rivate Funding •R01 or R21? Choose T heAppropriate Grant T ype he •R01 or R21? Choose T Appropriate Grant T ype •Dealing with the ‘Negative’ Staffer in your L ab ab •Dealing with the ‘Negative’ Staffer in your L •Is P roper AnimalH andlingP artof Your L abCulture? 5 Clues roper Animal H •Is P andling P of Your L Culture? 5 Clues art ab Start your FREE Subscription Today! Visit http://bit.ly/SciencePro Or Call 800-303-0129 ext 506

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