Ooops! Pinar Akkaya BNC Recruitment Summit 21 September 2011, Istanbul When Recruitment Interviews Go Wrong
Before I start… <ul><li>This presentation is about the  </li></ul><ul><li>mistakes  interviewers  make… </li></ul>They do ...
Why the interview success is so important? Because: We make people choices
Organizational performance Great people choices lead to: Individual success
What’s your goal? to hire  “ the right person” for “the job”
3 pillars of an interview
Cultural Fit:   ıs he in line with the way we do business here? Technical Fit:  Can this person do the job?  Motivational ...
Close your eyes…  Remember the worst interview you’ve had!
hiring is a challenge! we sometimes make mistakes and yes..
Mistak es   u nder  the magnifier
Let’s get started!
Starring… The Tricker The Incompetent The Superficial The Disorganised
Episode 1 The Tricker
<ul><li>Trying to chase the candidate, stressing him unnecessarily </li></ul>Being curious: Is this really a question that...
Episode 2 The Incompetent
<ul><li>What’s in the market? </li></ul>What am I looking for? Ah, my interviewing techniques! A good fit? What?? Resume i...
What am I looking for? <ul><li>Not knowing your target.  </li></ul><ul><li>Not having a clear idea of what  you  are looki...
Not knowing the market:  Availability and Cost
Poor Interviewing Techniques
CV The King <ul><li>Many people are too influenced by the resume of the candidate before the interview.  </li></ul>
Ignoring the question of “fit”
Not selling the job and the company  <ul><li>Interview is a two way street! </li></ul><ul><li>Talent is scarce!   </li></u...
Assessing with personal theories
Failing to see the exceptional “talent”
Episode 3 The Superficial
<ul><li>Hey, you shine! </li></ul>I ask a question, you already know the answer Men are always …. Great, you look exactly ...
Asking predictable questions
Letting a candidate’s one major positive blind you to the negatives
<ul><li>4–9 mns  </li></ul>
 
Cloning error/Mirror imaging
The beautiful / handsome candidate
Episode 4 The Disorganized
<ul><li>He declined? Gosh, we restart </li></ul>Here, it takes ages to decide! Sound of Silence We are crowded over here, ...
Having a very long assessment cycle .  <ul><li>12 to 16 weeks to fill a vacancy </li></ul><ul><li>G ood candidates are los...
Not having “backup” candidates.
Silence: No replies, no feedback
Too crowded and not too right
Not  enough or  too many .
the  mistakes This   was about
Bad Hire!
A 'bad hire'  is  a new recruit  who  either does not have the required skill set  or someone who does not have the right ...
Bad Hires  Cost Even More! Hiring is Costly!
 
Jack Welch ‘ Hiring great people is brutally hard…I’d say as a young manager, I picked the right people about  50%  of the...
Individual success Organizational performance Great people choices lead to: But bad hires have a direct effect too on
How to calculate the cost of a bad hire?
Here is a Bad Hire Calculator Source: www.hrworld.com
let’s take a closer look Source: www.hrworld.com
Here is a Bad Hire Calculator
but there is more to it!
HR time and recruiting costs Training costs growth  and reputation of the Company financial  results of the company Produc...
Before I leave you…
Interviewing is an art. Interviewing is a science.
Develop your own interviewing style Understand the art & science of interviewing! Structure your interview Use a mixture o...
Are you a “trained” interviewer?
Are you a “prepared” interviewer?
Prepare, prepare, prepare!
For those who want to dig deeper…
From my library…
The End
get connected! LinkedIn: http://tr.linkedin.com/in/pinarakkaya   Twitter:  http://twitter.com/PINARAKKAYA http://twitter.c...
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PINAR AKKAYA - Oooops! When recruitment interviews go wrong

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  • Strong people choices are key to sustainable great organizational performance Studies show that the leader effect can account for up to 40 % of the variance in co mpany performance Claudio Fernández-Aráoz is a partner and member of the global executive committee in the leading executive search firm Egon Zehnder International.
  • Three things to question for every interview: Technical fit: Basic skills to do the job Motivational fit: Basic personal attributes to do the job Cultural Fit: Is he in line with the way we do business? Form a JD (a complete list of major tasks) = present &amp;quot;must have&apos;s + future needs of the position Determine the skills required to perform the job. 1. Technical skills are learned through education, training, or on-the-job experience. (what a person can do) 2. Performance skills are work habits and personal characteristics: Flexibility, assertiveness, attention to detail, ability to cope under pressure. (how a person will do the job)
  • How many of you thought the interview you’ve had as interviewee? How many of you thought the interview you’ve had as interviewer ?
  • ETHICAL INTERVIEWING Relevance: Creativity question for an accounting role Sugarcoating: If you have a great candidate, you want him to accept your offer. So, you may be afraid that, if you talk about the downsides, you will lose him. Be objective about challenges in the job or within the company. Hire people who can cope with these. Bad setting: Ringing phones, people knocking at the doors, message signals, outside noise. Ideally no interview in airports, public places, hotel lobbies. Feel responsible of the candidate: If I misguide him, I will be the first person he will knock at the door. And he is right.
  • Get to know your market: Interview enough candidates to see what the market can give. Also to understand the expected rem level for the talent you desire. The talent is scarce, the number of good quality candidates is a lot lower than it was before . Not seeing adequate number of candidates to sense what’s available in the market. Not being realistic about the package to attract “the” candidate.
  • “ Tell me about yourself” Merely chatting with the candidate Speaking more than the candidate during the interview Not having any planned questions in front. Continuing with random questions all along the interview: Free form, based on candidate’s answers Candidate taking control of the interview and leading you Most interviewers start with the generic “Tell me about yourself”, ask random questions to “get to know the candidate,” make notes on the r e sum e s, and then later try to remember each one to make a compar ison . They end up not remembering the differences. Dominant profiles, talkative candidates Ask for concrete examples: Then the candidate will not tell about his ideal world but his real experience If you dont have a good knowledge about the technical side of the JD, get help. You may risk eliminating a technically strong candidate due to your own ignorance.
  • A resume can be misleading A resume is just a TOOL for the interview
  • Every organization has a culture: People, industry, location, history , leadership have impact on the culture. Does your candidate “fit” in your culture? Ask questions whose answers will demonstrate the candidate’s personality and character, their attitudes towards the workplace: Do you prefer a structured or an easy-going environment? Why?
  • Choosing or eliminating a candidate based on a personal theory WHICH IS NOT NECESSARILY TRUE
  • Some interviewers stick so strongly to the role they are interviewing for, that they become blind to the exceptional talent in front of them.
  • Even the wrong candidate for your position could answer the questions in a way that fools you into thinking he is a fit. Job applicants have many sources of help for interviewing, and it’s easy to learn acceptable answers to the standard questions.
  • Sometimes a person might have one outstanding positive: worked for your major competitor, attended a very reputable university etc. Dont let yourself to be too influenced by this.   Put + and – on your notes together.
  • Premature decision making Research: Most interviewers will decide hire/not to hire a candidate during the first 4 to 9 mns of the interview
  • Interviewer bias &amp; Stereotyping Stereotyping: Having prejudice towards a specific group of people: Man are good managers Women are always detail oriented
  • She’s just like me, I like her!!! He’s from my highschool, he must be very good!!
  • Physical appearance: Several research on attractiveness in interviews. Being physically attractive is a distinct advantage.
  • Interviewing a candidate more than 4 times means you are not efficiently interviewing. Dont delay the assessment and the decision making, a good candidate will lose interest and the spell will be gone.
  • What happens when your offer is not accepted? Do you re-start all over? FRUSTRATION! Continue interviewing till the person accepts the job, even further. Try to generate more than 1 option for the role.
  • Treat candidates with respect: Make timely returns, give them honest, timely, open feedback. If the are signed off, tell them on time and with reasons. Return their calls. If your process takes long and want to keep a good candidate, dont break the info flow. Keep him updated. Candidates select companies based on their assessment experiences too.
  • S tudies show that hiring is successful when one person, the one who needs the “person” is the best person to involve. The probability of a bad hire increases when too many people involved in hiring process . If you want a second opinion, choose someone who has an interest in that role too and dont make it too many.
  • Many times we ask to see only the top 3-4 candidates. No time, dont want to spend the effort. 3-4 is too little for a good basis. 8-10 can give you a good sense of the market. The position plays a role as well. You should interview till you get a good sense of the market. By seeing an adequate number of candidates, you will be able to see the talent level as well as the remuneration ranges you need. Dont interview unnnecessarily high number of candidates either. Focus on your end goal and try to be concise.
  • Not firing a new hire when the hiring is obviously a mistake. Everyone wants to believe he will succeeed. And thinks that his mistakes are due to his newness . “He’ll learn, he doesnt know” Many managers see that the hire is not successful in a few weeks. There is a big difference between “rookie” mistakes and poor work habits, low integrity, bad manners , personal problems.
  • Jack Welch (born November 19, 1935) was Chairman and CEO of General Electric between 1981 and 2001. Quote from Jack Welch Interview: How fast should you move when you sense you’ve made a hiring mistake? In a word, very. So fast, in fact, that if you’re moving at the right speed in taking care of a hiring mistake, it will probably feel too fast. That’s O.K. In every case, a rapid intervention is better for the organization, your own career, and even the person you’re letting go. Look, hiring great people is brutally hard. New managers are lucky to get it right half the time. And even executives with decades of experience will tell you that they make the right calls 75% of the time at best. The problem is, the stakes are so high. Never has it been so important to field a team with the best players. Every smart idea matters. Every ounce of passion makes a difference. You cannot have a black hole in your organization where a star should be. So that’s the first reason you need to face up to hiring mistakes quickly. Sure, maybe one individual’s poor performance won’t sink the company. But when your “mistakes” aren’t doing their jobs, it invariably puts a strain on the whole team and makes work harder for everyone else. So resentment toward the underperformers—and toward you for hiring them—builds up. And yet, as your question implies, too many managers procrastinate for too many months before acting on their hiring mistakes. They’ll tell you they’re hoping the mistake’s performance will improve with time and experience. They might also moan about the time that’s required to find someone new and bring him up to speed. But the real, unspoken reason most managers don’t act is that they fear looking stupid and worry that admitting they made a hiring mistake is career suicide. In any good organization, that logic is exactly backward. Any company worth its salt will reward managers when they acknowledge they’ve hired wrong and swiftly repair the damage. They get more positive buzz for the operational improvements that occur when the right person is finally in place. Indeed, recognizing mistakes—and fixing them boldly—builds a manager’s credibility. Hoping against hope that the mistake will go away does the opposite. Now, it is important to note that “boldly” doesn’t mean harshly. Remember: You made the error. Don’t blame the person who persuaded you that he was right for the job. Break the news candidly, take responsibility for what went wrong, make a fair financial arrangement, and then give the departing employee time to look for a soft landing somewhere else. Both you and the person you hired need to feel as if you handled everything properly, especially should you ever meet again when your former “hiring mistake” happens to become a potential customer. Of course, the best way to handle hiring mistakes is to not hire them in the first place. Yes, bringing in the right people is, as noted above, a tough business fraught with pitfalls. But you can really improve your chances if you fight like hell against the three main hiring impulses that most often get managers into trouble. The first is using your gut. Don’t! When you have a big, crucial job opening to fill, it’s just too easy to fall in love with a shiny new candidate who is on his best behavior, telling you exactly what you want to hear and looking like the answer to all your prayers. That’s why you can never hire alone. Make sure a team coolly analyzes the candidate’s credentials and conducts interviews. And by all means, make sure the team includes at least one real hardnose— the kind of naysayer who is particularly good at sussing out the job fit and sniffing out the phonies. The second instinct you have to fight is what we call the “recommendation reflex,” in which managers rationalize away negative references with excuses like: “Well, our job is different.” You should seek out your own references to call, not just the ones provided by the candidate, and force yourself to listen to what they have to tell you even if it ruins the pretty picture you are painting in your head. Finally, fight the impulse to do all the talking. Yes, you want to sell your job, but not at all costs. In interviews, ask candidates about their last job—and then shut up for a good, long while. As they describe what they liked and what they didn’t, you will likely hear much of what you really need to know about fit. True, you may still make a mistake, but at least it won’t be because you rushed. Save the speed for fixing things if they unfortunately go awry. Business Week magazine on January 29, 2007.
  • Right Management Survey: 26% of respondents reported that replacing an employee that doesn’t work out cost their organizations three times annual salary and another 42 % said bad hires cost two times annual salary. The cost of a bad hire can range from 1-5 times of their annual salary.
  • Structure your interview. A mix of behavioral, stress, situational, personality interview techniques where and when needed to measure the fits as precisely as you can. Dont forget the human element when interviewing. Understand the psychological state of the candidate and control it.
  • Gut feeling?? Strong people choices are not based on gut feelings!
  • Make sure you have all the relevant information on your desk. CV, jd, salary details etc. the first step to successful hiring is preparation. Its more than a 30-second scan of the resume.
  • PINAR AKKAYA - Oooops! When recruitment interviews go wrong

    1. 1. Ooops! Pinar Akkaya BNC Recruitment Summit 21 September 2011, Istanbul When Recruitment Interviews Go Wrong
    2. 2. Before I start… <ul><li>This presentation is about the </li></ul><ul><li>mistakes interviewers make… </li></ul>They do several mistakes too… But that’s the subject of another presentation Candidates?
    3. 3. Why the interview success is so important? Because: We make people choices
    4. 4. Organizational performance Great people choices lead to: Individual success
    5. 5. What’s your goal? to hire “ the right person” for “the job”
    6. 6. 3 pillars of an interview
    7. 7. Cultural Fit: ıs he in line with the way we do business here? Technical Fit: Can this person do the job? Motivational Fit: Does he have the traits and desire to do the job?
    8. 8. Close your eyes… Remember the worst interview you’ve had!
    9. 9. hiring is a challenge! we sometimes make mistakes and yes..
    10. 10. Mistak es u nder the magnifier
    11. 11. Let’s get started!
    12. 12. Starring… The Tricker The Incompetent The Superficial The Disorganised
    13. 13. Episode 1 The Tricker
    14. 14. <ul><li>Trying to chase the candidate, stressing him unnecessarily </li></ul>Being curious: Is this really a question that will measure a competence? Being irrelevant: Asking questions for competences that are not necessary for the role Sugarcoating the job Setting a bad interviewing environment
    15. 15. Episode 2 The Incompetent
    16. 16. <ul><li>What’s in the market? </li></ul>What am I looking for? Ah, my interviewing techniques! A good fit? What?? Resume is a star This is a great job, in a great company I’ve got my own theories to assess
    17. 17. What am I looking for? <ul><li>Not knowing your target. </li></ul><ul><li>Not having a clear idea of what you are looking for. </li></ul><ul><li>Not being specific about the duties, skills, and competencies you need. </li></ul>
    18. 18. Not knowing the market: Availability and Cost
    19. 19. Poor Interviewing Techniques
    20. 20. CV The King <ul><li>Many people are too influenced by the resume of the candidate before the interview. </li></ul>
    21. 21. Ignoring the question of “fit”
    22. 22. Not selling the job and the company <ul><li>Interview is a two way street! </li></ul><ul><li>Talent is scarce! </li></ul><ul><li>Go od candidates have many choices. </li></ul><ul><li>Make him feel that “this is a great place to work for!” </li></ul><ul><li>Even the one who will make not the cut! </li></ul>
    23. 23. Assessing with personal theories
    24. 24. Failing to see the exceptional “talent”
    25. 25. Episode 3 The Superficial
    26. 26. <ul><li>Hey, you shine! </li></ul>I ask a question, you already know the answer Men are always …. Great, you look exactly like me! Yep, I made up my mind! Waow, how gorgeous she looks!
    27. 27. Asking predictable questions
    28. 28. Letting a candidate’s one major positive blind you to the negatives
    29. 29. <ul><li>4–9 mns </li></ul>
    30. 31. Cloning error/Mirror imaging
    31. 32. The beautiful / handsome candidate
    32. 33. Episode 4 The Disorganized
    33. 34. <ul><li>He declined? Gosh, we restart </li></ul>Here, it takes ages to decide! Sound of Silence We are crowded over here, let us decide together Too many candidates!
    34. 35. Having a very long assessment cycle . <ul><li>12 to 16 weeks to fill a vacancy </li></ul><ul><li>G ood candidates are lost to more decisive companies </li></ul>
    35. 36. Not having “backup” candidates.
    36. 37. Silence: No replies, no feedback
    37. 38. Too crowded and not too right
    38. 39. Not enough or too many .
    39. 40. the mistakes This was about
    40. 41. Bad Hire!
    41. 42. A 'bad hire' is a new recruit who either does not have the required skill set or someone who does not have the right attitude required for the job.
    42. 43. Bad Hires Cost Even More! Hiring is Costly!
    43. 45. Jack Welch ‘ Hiring great people is brutally hard…I’d say as a young manager, I picked the right people about 50% of the time. Thirty years later, I had improved to about 80 %.’ (quote from Winning)
    44. 46. Individual success Organizational performance Great people choices lead to: But bad hires have a direct effect too on
    45. 47. How to calculate the cost of a bad hire?
    46. 48. Here is a Bad Hire Calculator Source: www.hrworld.com
    47. 49. let’s take a closer look Source: www.hrworld.com
    48. 50. Here is a Bad Hire Calculator
    49. 51. but there is more to it!
    50. 52. HR time and recruiting costs Training costs growth and reputation of the Company financial results of the company Productivity loss one to five times of the annual salary morale and confidence of the other employees attrition risk for business secrets and company data loss of customer loyalty and the brand equity harder work for others low employee morale frustration Legal fees, indenmities re-hiring
    51. 53. Before I leave you…
    52. 54. Interviewing is an art. Interviewing is a science.
    53. 55. Develop your own interviewing style Understand the art & science of interviewing! Structure your interview Use a mixture of different techniques Keep an eye on the candidate psychology Take notes
    54. 56. Are you a “trained” interviewer?
    55. 57. Are you a “prepared” interviewer?
    56. 58. Prepare, prepare, prepare!
    57. 59. For those who want to dig deeper…
    58. 60. From my library…
    59. 61. The End
    60. 62. get connected! LinkedIn: http://tr.linkedin.com/in/pinarakkaya Twitter: http://twitter.com/PINARAKKAYA http://twitter.com/lifesocialmedia E-mail: [email_address] http://tr.linkedin.com/groups/hrleadersturkey

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