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Creating Dazzling ePortfolios - Carol Teitelman #OZeLIVE

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Creating Dazzling ePortfolios - Carol Teitelman #OZeLIVE …

Creating Dazzling ePortfolios - Carol Teitelman #OZeLIVE
http://ozelve.com

The discussion will start with the accepted four steps to portfolio construction and the learning theory associated with each step.
Then digital tools that are widely accepted and free or minimal cost will be introduced to support each step. Participants will be encouraged to add their ideas along the way and build an action plan for starting their own portfolio or a template for working with their students.

Carol Teitelman is currently the coordinator for distance learning at one of the 20 regional education service centers in Texas. She has been working with instructional technology in the classroom and with professional development for 20 years. She has presented at ISTE, TCEA, PAECT, and TXDLA. Known for her lively presentations, she loves to share her love of learning with other educators.

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  • Introduction
    Ask for hand raise if anyone has a portfolio for themselves or their students
    Overview
    Look at the types of portfolios
    Steps to building a portfolio
    Online and offline tools for eportfolio
  • Talk about the process…product and process people…what the eportfolio strengthens for each one…
    Electronic Portfolios: Integrating Technology for Meaningful Learning
    In the Classroom with Bijal Damani
    Integrating technology in the classroom can make a vast difference in teaching, learning, and assessment. Being a business studies teacher for grades 11 and 12, I used to receive numerous requests from graduates wishing to have copies of their—as well their peers'—presentations, business plans, case studies, creative advertisements, and other projects. However, it was difficult to preserve every students' projects for future reference.
    I began compiling each student's projects and burning them on a DVD for every class. But that did not help much when students wanted something readily accessible from anywhere. Also, collaborating on projects was difficult for students who wanted to work on them during their vacations.
    At that time, I came across the blog by Helen Barrett (http://blog.helenbarrett.org), and I felt inspired to create an e-classroom and connect my students' portfolios to it using Google applications. Electronic portfolios, or e-portfolios, allow students to do six Cs: create, collect, connect, collaborate, conserve, and control.
    E-portfolios are emerging tools for collecting documents, presentations, videos, photographs, and assessment histories that students prepare and maintain. They can display students' accomplishments, works in progress, and other academic records. Sharing work with peers, teachers, parents, and potential employers—in fact, anyone in the world—is easy with these tools.
    I find that using e-portfolios has helped me tremendously in engaging my students in the learning process. Technology gives students opportunities to take ownership of their learning, and showcasing and sharing work with their peers and parents greatly motivates students. From a teacher's standpoint, portfolios help enormously in formative assessment, because evidence collected in them can give a much richer picture of learners' strengths and achievements than a mere test score. (One word of caution for teachers assessing students' portfolios: be clear which competencies you are assessing.)
    Using e-portfolios has helped me build my students' confidence with their information and communication technology (ICT) skills, which are crucial at the university level, and also encourages students to reflect on their processes of learning and development. Because e-portfolios are expandable, students can add as many pages as they wish. Plus, the portfolios are easy to update and universally accessible, making them the perfect tool to facilitate student collaborations.
    However, e-portfolios aren't appropriate for every classroom. There are potential risks involved in using an e-portfolio system with students; therefore, you should always check your school's policy regarding online protocols. Also, successful implementation of an e-portfolio system requires access to computers and a high-speed internet connection, which may not be available in many developing and underdeveloped nations. And students' ICT skill level plays an important role in their ability to build and maintain these tools.
    Starting off can also be time-consuming for teachers as well as students; but once you've overcome any initial teething problems, e-portfolios are really fun to develop and assess. A tip for teachers interested in using e-portfolios is to make one of your own as a model for students. It can offer evidence of your own academic and professional progress as well. 
  • The pedagogical benefits are also discussed by MOSEP project.
    “The notion of self-organised learning, self-regulated, self-directed is deeply embedded in the pedagogical eportfolio concept.”
    eportfolios improve learning,support lifelong learning, record learner progress and recognise informal learning. One can not have a greater benefit than that of developing effective learning through metacognition and supporting effective pedagogical practice, such as assessment for …. eportfolios facilitate increased motivation and engagement in learning. By allowing students to publish learning, greater self-confidence is gained and supported by discussion and reflection.
    http://www.core-ed.org/sites/efellows.org.nz/files/nick-eportfolios.pdf
    Student: NETS 1.b. Create original works
    2. B communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
    5. B exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration, learning and productivity
    5 c Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning
    6 b Select and use applications effectively and productively
    Teachers
    1 c Promote student reflection using collaborative tools to reveal and clarify students conceptual understanding and thinking, planning and creative processes
    2. B develop tech enriched learning environments that enable all students to pursue their individual curiosities and become active participants in setting their own educational goals, managing their own learning and assessing their own progress
    D provide students with multiple and varied formative and summative assessments aligned with content and technology standards and use the resulting data to inform learning and teaching
    Coaches
    2. D coach teachers in and model design and implementation of tech enhanced learning experiences emphazining creativity, higher order thinking skills and processes and mental habits of the mind ie…metacognition and self regulation
    g. varied formative and summative assessments aligned with content and technology standards and use the resulting data to inform learning and teaching
  • Emphasize the difference in 3D and electronic porfolios
  • Not only is process hard to show because of its abstract nature, how do we best represent 3 dimensional and non 2 dimensional products?
    Sound
    Video
    Photos – panoramic, 360, flat
    Written
  • Chapter 1. The Types of Portfolios
    As more and more educators use portfolios, they increasingly recognize that the process has the power to transform instruction. Some teachers, however, are confused by the many types of portfolios, their different uses, and the practical issues surrounding storage, ownership, and the like.
    The three major types of portfolios are: working portfolios, display portfolios, and assessment portfolios. Although the types are distinct in theory, they tend to overlap in practice. Consequently, a district's program may include several different types of portfolios, serving several different purposes. As a result, it is important for educators to be clear about their goals, the reasons they are engaging in a portfolio project, and the intended audience for the portfolios.
    http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/197171/chapters/The-Types-of-Portfolios.aspx
    WORKING major purpose of a working portfolio is to serve as a holding tank for student work. Given its use in diagnosis, the primary audience for a working portfolio is the student, with guidance from the teacher A working portfolio is typically structured around a specific content area; pieces collected relate to the objectives of that unit and document student progress toward mastery of those objectives. Therefore, sufficient work must be collected to provide ample evidence of student achievement. Because diagnosis is a major purpose of the working portfolio, some of the pieces included will show less than complete understanding an help shape future instruction.
    Display, Showcase, or Best Works Portfolios
    Probably the most rewarding use of student portfolios is the display of the students' best work, the work that makes them proud. Students, as well as their teachers, become most committed to the process when they experience the joy of exhibiting their best work and interpreting its meaning The purpose of a display portfolio is to demonstrate the highest level of achievement attained by the student. Collecting items for this portfolio is a student's way of saying “Here's who I am. Here is what I can AUDIENCE Since the student selects her or his own best works, the audience for a display portfolio is that student and the other important individuals, Most pieces for a display portfolio are collected in a working portfolio of school projects. Sometimes, however, a student will include a piece of work from outside the classroom, 
    Assessment Portfolios
    The primary function of an assessment portfolio is to document what a student has learned. Purpose The primary purpose of an assessment portfolio is to document student learning on specific curriculum outcomes. Audience – whomever needs to documentation of student learning, Process
    There are eight basic steps in developing an assessment portfolio system. Since portfolio entries represent a type of performance, these steps resemble the principles for developing good performance assessments.
    Determine the curricular objectives to be addressed through the portfolio.
    Determine the decisions that will be made based on the portfolio assessments. Will the assessments be used for high-stakes assessment at certain levels of schooling (for example, to enable students to make the transition from middle school to high school)?
    Design assessment tasks for the curricular objectives. Ensure that the task matches instructional intentions and adequately represents the content and skills (including the appropriate level of difficulty) students are expected to attain. These considerations will ensure the validity of the assessment tasks.
    Define the criteria for each assessment task and establish performance standards for each criterion.
    Determine who will evaluate the portfolio entries. Will they be teachers from the students' own school? Teachers from another school? Or does the state identify and train evaluators?
    Train teachers or other evaluators to score the assessments. This will ensure the reliability of the assessments.
    Teach the curriculum, administer assessments, collect them in portfolios, score assessments.
    As determined in Step 2, make decisions based on the assessments in the portfolios.
    Assessment portfolios raise many important practical and technical issues, particularly if they are used for high-stakes decisions.
  • A major contribution of portfolios is that they allow students to document aspects of their learning that do not show up well in traditional assessments. Some examples follow.
    Community Service
    Community service is now required in many schools. Since this type of activity is not well suited to traditional assessments such as tests and quizzes, portfolio assessment provides an excellent vehicle for assessing the goals of a community service curriculum. Students can collect examples of service, select the best ones, reflect on their experiences, and determine future goals. The entries in such a portfolio might include research, narrative summaries of activities performed, pictures, videos, projects, and the like. The community, in addition to the school, may be an audience for this portfolio.
    Interdisciplinary Unit
    An interdisciplinary unit of study that includes many different content areas is often difficult to evaluate using traditional methods of assessment. A portfolio can provide a way to include many types of work that indicate proficiency in various disciplines. Entries might show evidence of growth in a single content area or a combination of areas. The cumulative effect of work in many disciplines, all relating to a single theme or topic, can be illuminating to the student as well as to others. An interdisciplinary unit on the rainforest, for example, could culminate in a portfolio containing samples of student accomplishment in writing, math, social studies, and art.
    Subject Area Portfolios
    Student learning in some areas is greatly enhanced through the use of portfolios to document learning. Portfolios are well established in writing. But there are many other excellent applications of the technique. A foreign language portfolio could have cultural artifacts relating to religion, art, and celebrations, as well as evidence of written and spoken proficiency in the language. A social studies portfolio could have interviews, projects, models, and reports. And art portfolios are well recognized as the optimal means of capturing the best of student performance in the arts, with drawings, slides, and examples of music composed or performed.
    College Admission
    Many colleges now request samples of student work from candidates for admission. Portfolios of best works are well suited to this purpose. Anything may be included in such a portfolio, including written work, videos, or projects, and the contents may be customized to suit the purposes of the student and the institution. The goal of assembling a portfolio for college admission has the additional benefit of providing powerful motivation for students during their high school years.
    Employment
    Some employers request samples of work from prospective employees. As with portfolios prepared for college admissions, students can use employment portfolios to document those features of their preparation that they believe would best convince an employer of their expertise in areas such as basic skills, problem solving and adaptability, and collaborative work skills. This movement toward employment portfolios is being fueled, in large part, by the national school to work movement, through which employers are insisting on a better-educated workforce (U.S. Dept. of Labor 1991).
    Skill Area Portfolios
    It is often desirable to demonstrate that students have acquired skills in specific areas, such as public speaking, problem solving, or the use of technology. Because these are assessment portfolios, attention must be paid to establishing relevant criteria, setting acceptable standards of performance, and selecting pieces that meet those standards. Because these skills also cut across disciplines, educators must determine whether students may demonstrate the skills in any manner they choose, or whether specific tasks will be established for them.
    Summary
    Portfolios may take many different forms and may be used for many different purposes. They may be used to diagnose, document, or celebrate learning. Regardless of their primary purpose or audience, they have the power to transform the learning environment in the classrooms where they are used. The magic of portfolios lies not in the portfolios themselves, but in the process used in creating them and the school culture in which documented learning is valued.
  • Bring up the screen share to show the Google doc….can access later to complete or to look at what others are doing.
    The pedagogical benefits are also discussed by MOSEP project.
    “The notion of self-organised learning, self-regulated, self-directed is deeply embedded in the pedagogical eportfolio concept.”
    eportfolios improve learning,support lifelong learning, record learner progress and recognise informal learning. One can not have a greater benefit than that of developing effective learning through metacognition and supporting effective pedagogical practice, such as assessment for …. eportfolios facilitate increased motivation and engagement in learning. By allowing students to publish learning, greater self-confidence is gained and supported by discussion and reflection.
    Student: NETS 1.b. Create original works
    2. B communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
    5. B exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration, learning and productivity
    5 c Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning
    6 b Select and use applications effectively and productively
    Teachers
    1 c Promote student reflection using collaborative tools to reveal and clarify students conceptual understanding and thinking, planning and creative processes
    2. B develop tech enriched learning environments that enable all students to pursue their individual curiosities and become active participants in setting their own educational goals, managing their own learning and assessing their own progress
    D provide students with multiple and varied formative and summative assessments aligned with content and technology standards and use the resulting data to inform learning and teaching
    Coaches
    2. D coach teachers in and model design and implementation of tech enhanced learning experiences emphazining creativity, higher order thinking skills and processes and mental habits of the mind ie…metacognition and self regulation
    g. varied formative and summative assessments aligned with content and technology standards and use the resulting data to inform learning and teaching
  • Rather than throw everything in the virtual or physical box to sort through later, taking pauses along the way to select and reflect builds a better reflection of the learning process.
    Comparison of current work to past illuminates changes that have occurred. Many students have an “ah-ha” moment when they can truly see what knowledge has done to help them perform more complex tasks.
  • Refer back to the types of portfolios… working, display and assessment. Can you have one central repository and then select certain pieces depending on the audience, i.e. college or employer, parent or teacher
    In chat: considering your grade level and subject, what is the most important reason to use a portfolio
  • Collection is chronological with pauses for reflection.
    Once you get to t
    The pedagogical benefits are also discussed by MOSEP project.
    “The notion of self-organised learning, self-regulated, self-directed is deeply embedded in the pedagogical eportfolio concept.”
    eportfolios improve learning,support lifelong learning, record learner progress and recognise informal learning. One can not have a greater benefit than that of developing effective learning through metacognition and supporting effective pedagogical practice, such as assessment for …. eportfolios facilitate increased motivation and engagement in learning. By allowing students to publish learning, greater self-confidence is gained and supported by discussion and reflection.
    Student: NETS 1.b. Create original works
    2. B communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
    5. B exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration, learning and productivity
    5 c Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning
    6 b Select and use applications effectively and productively
    Teachers
    1 c Promote student reflection using collaborative tools to reveal and clarify students conceptual understanding and thinking, planning and creative processes
    2. B develop tech enriched learning environments that enable all students to pursue their individual curiosities and become active participants in setting their own educational goals, managing their own learning and assessing their own progress
    D provide students with multiple and varied formative and summative assessments aligned with content and technology standards and use the resulting data to inform learning and teaching
    Coaches
    2. D coach teachers in and model design and implementation of tech enhanced learning experiences emphazining creativity, higher order thinking skills and processes and mental habits of the mind ie…metacognition and self regulation
    g. varied formative and summative assessments aligned with content and technology standards and use the resulting data to inform learning and teaching
    he display grouping and themes are used to make the contents more meaningful for the audience
  • Decisions, decisions.
    Rubrics can be helpful to students in making the choices and are necessary for assessment portfolios.
    Show desktop http://seuss.wcs.sad40.k12.me.us/ep/rubric.htm
    http://www.littlechute.k12.wi.us/cms_files/resources/Teacher%20Rubric.pdf
    Working Portfolios
    Excerpted from Reading & Writing Remediation Kit.
    Working portfolios and show portfolios can be used in the assessment of content literacy instruction. However, working portfolios are much more relevant for students in the elementary and middle schools. A working portfolio contains all of the materials with which the student is currently engaged. A teacher can learn a great deal about a student's abilities and interests by carefully examining his or her portfolio on a regular basis and by having regularly scheduled conferences of about 10 to 15 minutes with the student about the portfolio at least four times a year.
    Here are some of the elements that can comprise a working portfolio:a table of contents to show the organization of the portfolio
    a reading/writing log
    various drafts of all types of writing that a student might do
    examples of all types of informal teaching and assessment devices in the content fields of literature (language arts or English), social studies, and science that the student has completed
    reading response journals
    dialogue journals
    examples of all types of activities and materials that the student is currently working on or has completed from the content fields of literature (language arts or English), social studies, and science
    examples of writing done outside of class
    teacher-completed and student-completed checklists and surveys of various types
    tape-recorded oral reading protocols
    audiotapes
    videotapes
    student-teacher conference notes
    various types of self-assessment devices
    the results of various kinds of standardized and informal tests
    teacher anecdotes and observations
    graphs of progress
    It always should be remembered that the major purpose of using a portfolio is the opportunity for a student to self-assess his or her work in the content fields.
    Any item that provides evidence of a student's achievement and growth can be included in a portfolio. Commonly used items include:Examples of written work
    Journals and logs
    Standardized inventories
    Videotapes of student performances
    Audiotapes of presentations
    Mind maps and notes
    Group reports
    Tests and quizzes
    Charts, graphs
    Lists of books read
    Questionnaire results
    Peer reviews
    Self-evaluations
  • Reflective thinking, on the other hand, is a part of the critical thinking process referring specifically to the processes of analyzing and making judgments about what has happened. Dewey (1933) suggests that reflective thinking is an active, persistent, and careful consideration of a belief or supposed form of knowledge, of the grounds that support that knowledge, and the further conclusions to which that knowledge leads. Learners are aware of and control their learning by actively participating in reflective thinking – assessing what they know, what they need to know, and how they bridge that gap – during learning situations.
    http://www.hawaii.edu/intlrel/p
    Characteristics of environments and activities that prompt and support reflective thinking:
    Provide enough wait-time for students to reflect when responding to inquiries.
    Provide emotionally supportive environments in the classroom encouraging reevaluation of conclusions.
    Prompt reviews of the learning situation, what is known, what is not yet known, and what has been learned.
    Provide authentic tasks involving ill-structured data to encourage reflective thinking during learning activities.
    Prompt students' reflection by asking questions that seek reasons and evidence.
    Provide some explanations to guide students' thought processes during explorations.
    Provide a less-structured learning environment that prompts students to explore what they think is important.
    Provide social-learning environments such as those inherent in peer-group works and small group activities to allow students to see other points of view.
    Provide reflective journal to write down students' positions, give reasons to support what they think, show awareness of opposing positions and the weaknesses of their own positions.
    ols382/Reflective%20Thinking%20-%20UH/reflection.html
    Modern society is becoming more complex, information is becoming available and changing more rapidly prompting users to constantly rethink, switch directions, and change problem-solving strategies. Thus, it is increasingly important to prompt reflective thinking during learning to help learners develop strategies to apply new knowledge to the complex situations in their day-to-day activities. Reflective thinking helps learners develop higher-order thinking skills by prompting learners to a) relate new knowledge to prior understanding, b) think in both abstract and conceptual terms, c) apply specific strategies in novel tasks, and d) understand their own thinking and learning strategies.
  • Chat: Can you add a reflection prompt….
  • Throw it at the wall and see if it sticks method! Sometimes it’s a good way to look at a collection of work to find themes. Great to have brainstorming with a partner or team to get different perspectives. Using a protocol such as the ones developed for the Critical Friends (Annenberg Protocols) can be developed to guide the process for students.
    Reflective process on student work http://www.district287.org/clientuploads/TeachingLearning/PREP/elsw_pdfs/TOOLS_reflecting.pdf
    Understandings evident in the work samples.
    What evidence do you see in the in work ?
    Missing or incorrect elements evident in work samples
    What evidence to you see in the work.
  • Based on research by Philip C. Abrami, C. Anne Wade, Vanitha Pillay, Ofra Aslan, Eva M. Bures, Caitlin Bentley: "Encouraging self-regulated learning through electronic portfolios." Canadian Journal of Learning and Technology V34(3) Fall 2008 (attached below)
    Reflection for action - Before
    ForethoughtInfluential processes which precede efforts to act and set the stage for actionGoal setting increases self-efficacy and intrinsic interestTask AnalysisGoal settingStrategic Planning
    Self-motivation beliefs increase commitmentSelf-motivational beliefs:
    Self-efficacyOutcome expectationsIntrinsic interest/valueGoal Orientation
    Reflection in action - During
    Performance or Volitional ControlProcesses that occur action and affect attention and actionSelf-control processes help learners to focus on tasks and optimize effortsSelf-instructionImageryAttention focusingTask Strategies
    Self-observation allows learners to vary aspects of their performanceSelf-recordingSelf-experimentation
    Reflection on action - After
    Self-ReflectionProcesses which occur after performance efforts and influence a person’s response to that experiencePlanning and implementing a strategy provides an evaluation metric for learners to attribute successes or failures to, rather than low abilitySelf-judgment
    Self-evaluationCasual attribution
    Self-reaction
    Self-satisfaction/affectAdaptive-defensive response
  • http://www.scribd.com/doc/9336533/ePortfolios-and-Assessment-for-Learning
    This diagram reflects the true nature of assessment for learning, where students work towards improving their learning, with guidance from teachers and other students orindependently, after self reflection and feedback. The cycle begins with the teacher facilitating the process of using exemplars of qualitylearning so that the process of co-constructing the success criteria and assessment rubricsis informed and inclusive. From there, students, who now have a clear shared understandingof what they are learning and how they will achieve success, will begin a learning project,guided by the teacher as required.If we take a written language project example, the students will produce a draft of their writingwhich is uploaded to or linked from their eportfolio. The draft piece of writing is now able tobe accessed and commented on by the student, teacher, other students or family members,and depending on the level of security, a wider global audience
    The next phase of the cycle is where the student works on improving their learning based ontheir own self-assessment and the feedback provided focusing on the success criteria. Asmentioned, this action can be completed independently or with the support and guidance of the teacher or other students. At the conclusion of this phase the student again uploads anartifact to their eportfolio entering another period of self-assessment and feedback. This could conclude this cycle of learning or spiral into another. The number of cycles is notprescribed and is flexible to individual students needs and abilities and is also determined bythe nature of the learning. For example, an extensive inquiry project or technology designventure may require many conferences and learning conversations, reflections and feedback.Students may also seek out more feedback or guidance at any stage in order to ascertainwhere they are at in terms of meeting the success criteria. The cyclic implementation of assessment for learning through eportfolios as described andshown in the diagram is the aim of the project. The feedback and commenting within theeportfolio framework is not intended to replace face to face learning conversations butcompliment them. It is also important to note that not all the listed people or groups arerequired to comment and provide feedback for each learning cycle. The AFL and ePortfolio cycle reinforces the importance of defining the
    “...e-Portfolios as a process, rather than just a product or a technological system.”
    Attwell (2007).
  • http://www.mcpasd.k12.wi.us/mhs/node/955/information/courses-graduation-requirements/graduation-requirements/e-portfolio
  • http://www.creativebloq.com/design-tools/best-photo-apps-513764
    Magisto – Android and ipad
  • http://www.techradar.com/us/news/software/applications/best-free-software-for-writing-10-programs-to-unleash-your-creativity-1141280
    http://www.theiteachhub.com/best-storybook-creators-for-kids/
  • The pedagogical benefits are also discussed by MOSEP project.
    “The notion of self-organised learning, self-regulated, self-directed is deeply embedded in the pedagogical eportfolio concept.”
    eportfolios improve learning,support lifelong learning, record learner progress and recognise informal learning. One can not have a greater benefit than that of developing effective learning through metacognition and supporting effective pedagogical practice, such as assessment for …. eportfolios facilitate increased motivation and engagement in learning. By allowing students to publish learning, greater self-confidence is gained and supported by discussion and reflection.
    Student: NETS 1.b. Create original works
    2. B communicate information and ideas effectively to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats.
    5. B exhibit a positive attitude toward using technology that supports collaboration, learning and productivity
    5 c Demonstrate personal responsibility for lifelong learning
    6 b Select and use applications effectively and productively
    Teachers
    1 c Promote student reflection using collaborative tools to reveal and clarify students conceptual understanding and thinking, planning and creative processes
    2. B develop tech enriched learning environments that enable all students to pursue their individual curiosities and become active participants in setting their own educational goals, managing their own learning and assessing their own progress
    D provide students with multiple and varied formative and summative assessments aligned with content and technology standards and use the resulting data to inform learning and teaching
    Coaches
    2. D coach teachers in and model design and implementation of tech enhanced learning experiences emphazining creativity, higher order thinking skills and processes and mental habits of the mind ie…metacognition and self regulation
    g. varied formative and summative assessments aligned with content and technology standards and use the resulting data to inform learning and teaching
  • Transcript

    • 1. EPORTFOLIOS Carol Teitelman cteitelman@gmail.com http://goo.gl/RtEQKq
    • 2. What ARE ePortfolios? “A reflection of the student as a person undergoing continual personal development – not just a store of evidence”  Helen Barrett
    • 3. IN YOUR WORDS OR GRAPHIC OR SOUND:
    • 4. What ARE ePortfolios? A report card shows letters and numbers... a portfolio shows growth and knowledge.  
    • 5. ePortfolio described http://nancy-rubin.com/2011/10/16/eportfolio-explained-visually/
    • 6. What have we done in the past?
    • 7. What do I do with?
    • 8. Kinds of Portfolios • Working • Display, Showcase, or Best Works • Assessment From Charlotte Danielson and Leslye Abrutyn
    • 9. More Specific Portfolios Community Service Interdisciplinary Unit Subject Area Portfolios Employment Portfolio Skill Area Portfolios
    • 10. Choose the type portfolio that you want to make with your class(es). Go to http://goo.gl/hCdU1Q Add your name and the type of portfolio you would like to start with.
    • 11. Start with the End in Mind...
    • 12. Goal? Purpose? • What do you want people to see? • Who is the audience?
    • 13. Portfolios Documenting process Displaying product... • • • • • • Chronologic Reflective Working Thematic Accountability or Showcase http://goo.gl/RtEQKq
    • 14. Collection of Artifacts
    • 15. Collection • What is collected? • Why is it collected? • Who decides?
    • 16. WHAT WILL YOU COLLECT? Use the chat to name ONE artifact/product/example of work that you KNOW you want to include.
    • 17. The Power of Reflection “We don’t learn from experience. We learn from reflecting on experience.” John Dewey
    • 18. Student Reflection Tools • https://docs.google.com/Doc?id=dd76m5
    • 19. Steps in a Non-Linear Process
    • 20. Reflection Cycle https://sites.google.com/site/k12eportfolios/resources/reflection-cycle
    • 21. Feedback An example “flow” http://www.scribd.com/doc/9336533/ePortfolios-and-Assessment-for-Learning
    • 22. Portfolios Documenting process Displaying product... • • • • • • Chronological Reflective Working Thematic Accountability or Showcase Audience?
    • 23. Audience • Walled Garden • Open to “Real World” • Different Audiences, Different Roles
    • 24. Tools for ePortfolios • Ability to collect multiple formats of evidence of growth, learning, change • May provide platform for larger audience (and feedback)
    • 25. TOOLS YOU USE! In the chat, list ONE or TWO tools you use that will be necessary for ePortfolio building.
    • 26. Collection Spaces • • • • • • • BULB State provided, district provided WIX folioforme Google sites LearnerJourney Digication
    • 27. Blogs as collections Examples: http://kidblog.org/MissDsClass2/ http://kidblog.org/missdunsigersclass/author/Jo
    • 28. Wikis as collections • Wikis – Wikispaces Examples: http://ah-bon-french.wikispaces.com/home https://jesseportfolio.wikispaces.com/Visual+Art
    • 29. Online Tools - Audio VoiceThread
    • 30. Online Tools – photo editing
    • 31. Online Tools for Writing E B 9 T S StoryB o ok Cre ators
    • 32. Apps • Screenchomp (free) • Jing (Free) • Showme (free) • Storykit (free)examples • Voicethread (best with paid subscription) • Evernote • Pinterest
    • 33. Google…”it’s in there”
    • 34. Other Tools • Scanners • Digital cameras • Video cameras • Audio recorders • Mobile Phones
    • 35. Your Toolchest Vote for the tool you use the most: a.Digital camera b.Digital recorder c.Scanner d.Mobile phone e.Tablet f.Document Camera
    • 36. The magic of portfolios lies not in the portfolios themselves, but in the process used in creating them and the school culture in which documented learning is valued. http://www.ascd.org/publications/books/197171/chapters/The-Types-of-Portfolios.aspx
    • 37. It’s about providing a true reflection….
    • 38. Wat itt no hk hs Gail Lovely for sharing her slides on ePortfolios to be the foundation of this presentation. Presented by Carol Teitelman cteitelman@gmail.com Twitter: @cteitelman Blog: Oh, the Places You’ll Go http://www5.esc13.net/thescoop/distancelearning/

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