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Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final
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Un women oxfam action aid_ids slides final

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  • Ground Rules
    Please make comments in the chat box on the left hand side of your screen.
    Please don’t use your microphones until the end. Kindly use the chat box to communicate with the participants and the presenters.
    The moderators will be managing the chat box and will compile all the questions so please do not worry about collecting everyone’s questions yourselves –
  • On your screen now is a map of the world. At the left hand side of your screens, there are several buttons arranged in a rectangular format. The second one from the top – with the star symbol – is called the pointer button.
    Using the pointer button, can you please show us from which part of the world you are joining this webinar? Simply click and drag the button towards the map on your screens.
  • 1. Unpaid care occupies large amounts of women and girl’s time, leading to time poverty which impacts directly on the rights that women and girls can enjoy – including the right to work, right to education, and the right to participation. These links have been made explicit in the UN special rapporteur’s report on unpaid care
    2. The lack of leisure time reduces women and girl’s wellbeing as well as impacting negatively on their health.
    3. Women in the paid labour market may not be able to provide for adequate substitutes for their care responsibilities, compromising the human development outcomes for those that they are caring for.
    4. Any substitutes may come through pushing the care responsibilities to older women and girls, which impacts on their development and rights.
    limited, as women may dropout or fail to take full advantage of the opportunities available
    b) individualised, rather than shared: if older women and girls replace mothers in the care of small children, physical and time pressures may mean they experience disempowerment
    c) unsustainable, because poor quality care is likely to have lasting adverse impacts on cognitive, educational, and therefore economic prospects of the next generation
    5. Finally, the income from paid work may be eroded by payments for substitute care, which defeats the objective of economic empowerment.
  • The report mentions the following rights violations:
    Right to work
    Rights at work
    Right to education
    Right to health
    Right to social security – maternity leave
    Right to benefit from scientific progress – infrastructure
    Right to participation
    I would add right to rest and leisure.
    Many of these rights violations are brought about or aggravated by specific economic policies. Here we draw on the great contribution that feminist economists have made to this debate in highlighting how economic policies rely on women’s unpaid care work to cushion the blow of austerity measures under structural adjustment programmes in the 80s and 90s, and today in response to the financial crisis. Cuts in public services, de-regulation of labour policies, and the lack of regulation to protect the environment are all political and economic policies that either ignore unpaid care work or take advantage of primarily women’s and girls’ labour. In the context of austerity women’s unpaid care work is seen as an “unlimited and cost-free alternative to public services and…shock-absorber for the crisis.” Framing the discussion on the basis of women’s rights and inequality highlights that this is not a cost-free alternative at all and that women, of which the poorest and most marginalised, end up being trapped in poverty.
  • The report mentions the following rights violations:
    Right to work
    Rights at work
    Right to education
    Right to health
    Right to social security – maternity leave
    Right to benefit from scientific progress – infrastructure
    Right to participation
    I would add right to rest and leisure.
    Many of these rights violations are brought about or aggravated by specific economic policies. Here we draw on the great contribution that feminist economists have made to this debate in highlighting how economic policies rely on women’s unpaid care work to cushion the blow of austerity measures under structural adjustment programmes in the 80s and 90s, and today in response to the financial crisis. Cuts in public services, de-regulation of labour policies, and the lack of regulation to protect the environment are all political and economic policies that either ignore unpaid care work or take advantage of primarily women’s and girls’ labour. In the context of austerity women’s unpaid care work is seen as an “unlimited and cost-free alternative to public services and…shock-absorber for the crisis.” Framing the discussion on the basis of women’s rights and inequality highlights that this is not a cost-free alternative at all and that women, of which the poorest and most marginalised, end up being trapped in poverty.
  • The report mentions the following rights violations:
    Right to work
    Rights at work
    Right to education
    Right to health
    Right to social security – maternity leave
    Right to benefit from scientific progress – infrastructure
    Right to participation
    I would add right to rest and leisure.
    Many of these rights violations are brought about or aggravated by specific economic policies. Here we draw on the great contribution that feminist economists have made to this debate in highlighting how economic policies rely on women’s unpaid care work to cushion the blow of austerity measures under structural adjustment programmes in the 80s and 90s, and today in response to the financial crisis. Cuts in public services, de-regulation of labour policies, and the lack of regulation to protect the environment are all political and economic policies that either ignore unpaid care work or take advantage of primarily women’s and girls’ labour. In the context of austerity women’s unpaid care work is seen as an “unlimited and cost-free alternative to public services and…shock-absorber for the crisis.” Framing the discussion on the basis of women’s rights and inequality highlights that this is not a cost-free alternative at all and that women, of which the poorest and most marginalised, end up being trapped in poverty.
  • So, care is invisible. It’s unequal. It has inadequate investment.
    Many people are convinced that ‘care provision is problematic’, but where do we start to make change?
    We know that the way societies organise care – the way that care is provided – is based on long-standing patterns and power relations. It’s based on beliefs, on rules and policies - in culture, in politics and in economics. It’s all very complex
    It’s important to be able to communicate in a simple way what are our strategies for change, the asks in policy advocacy -
    Diane Elson proposed a powerful framework of 3 Rs, and we’ve added a fourth R - Our strategies in communities and organisations are these 4 Rs, and they’re also the 4 ‘asks’ to policy makers.
    Recognise Care... Reduce... Redistribute... And increase Representation.
  • WHO are we asking to change?
    The Care Diamond shows how each society divides up responsibility for providing care -
    Men & women, girls and boys provide care in household through unpaid work
    The market provides care – through paid workers, cleaning businesses and employers paying for maternity leave or health care
    Care is provided by NGOs, community and religious groups
    And the state provides care – by paying subsidies, or employing care professionals and regulating business & employers.
    So our claims for Redistribution of care are from families at the top of the diamond down to states and employers
    And the claims for Reducing the drudgery of care, are that the state and businesses and NGOs provide infrastructure and services to support households.
  • Development actors – must include business/ employers
    In the thematic review -
  • Need evidence of the problem
    Rigorous Time use surveys are critical , but very expensive. National level surveys are
  • Installing water pumps – Azerbaijan, Philippines
    Installing electricity – Honduras, Philippines, Sri Lanka
    Providing childcare services – Azerbaijan, Colombia, Honduras, OPT, Philippines
    Improving healthcare and sanitation services – Azerbaijan, OPT, Philippines
    Providing public parks where children can spend time safely – OPT
    Building capacity to improve and enforce laws on labour and women’s rights – OPT
    Providing a bus service to take children to and from school – Sri Lanka
    Raising awareness on family planning – Bangladesh
  • http://www.youtube.com/v/VVW858gQHoE
  • Transcript

    • 1. Inspiring actions to recognize, reduce and redistribute rural women's unpaid care work Thematic Webinar Series on Women's Economic Empowerment 19 November 2013, 9-10 am EST
    • 2. Welcome & Ground rules • We would love to have your feedback and questions. Kindly send your comments and questions through the chat box. • If you would like to speak, please raise the hand sign. The Moderator will unmute your microphone once it is your turn to speak.
    • 3. Session Tips Ensure that your AUDIO is working. Kindly use your computer headset or phone connection. Should you have trouble hearing or being heard, close other applications on your computer (improves speed!). If you have any technical problems, please send an email to knowledge.gateway@unwomen.org
    • 4. Polling questions Which household task do you most LIKE to do? A: cooking (incl. getting water and fuel) B: washing or ironing clothes C: cleaning house D: food shopping or growing food E: care of children, elderly or sick
    • 5. Where are you in the world today?
    • 6. Who is who in today’s webinar? Speakers Thalia Kidder Moderator Rachel Moussié Anna Falth Deepta Chopra
    • 7. Agenda for today’s webinar 1. Background and ‘common ground’ What is Care? What is the problem? - Deepta Chopra Linking care to human rights & women’s rights – Rachel Moussie Policy asks and strategies for change: the ‘4 Rs’ – Thalia Kidder POLL 2. Working with communities, communications & advocacy  Oxfam’s Rapid Care Analysis, local influencing, viral emails – Thalia  Getting Care on the Agenda, Action Aid experience – Rachel  Institute of Development Studies Animation - Deepta Discussion, QUESTIONS and ANSWERS
    • 8. What is care? Definition: ‘Care’ includes direct care of people, housework that facilitates caring for people (indirect care) and volunteer community care of people, and paid carers, cleaners, health and education workers Care is a social good, underpins all development progress Sustains and reproduces society Markets depend on care for their functioning Unpaid care work
    • 9. Why is Unpaid Care Work important? 1. Care has a widespread, long-term, positive impact on wellbeing and development, & is critical to address inequality and vulnerability. 2. Care is important in understanding women’s lives: Occupies large amounts of women’s and girls’ time -- restricting participation in civil, economic and social spheres Lack of leisure time -- reduction in women and girl’s well being  Drudgery ....adverse health outcomes Income from paid work....eroded with costs of care substitution Economic empowerment through paid work...individualised, limited and unsustainable  Who cares when women work in paid jobs ....reduction of care, adverse outcomes for care recipients
    • 10. What’s the problem? It is UNEQUAL Unequal distribution of care undermines women’s and girls’ rights, limit their opportunities, capabilities and choices and impedes their empowerment. It is INVISIBLE In Policy – Intent and implementation In Research – Political economy analysis of processes; M&E, impact evaluations In Programming – entry points, integration/ mainstreaming (women-related and general programmes) Amongst donors, government officials, researchers In budgeting - It has INADEQUATE INVESTMENT.
    • 11. Research on SP and ECD policy No of policies reviewed No. of policies which have a care intent No. of countries that these policies were from Social Protection 107 23 (21%) 16 (out of 53) – SSA and LA Early childhood development 270 41 (15%) 33 (out of 142) – LA and SSA SP: Main focus on redistribution of care responsibilities from the family to the state. Nothing about redistribution within the family; only 2 about reduction of drudgery ECD: Focus is on support for carers in terms of better parenting, including the inclusion of men as fathers. Redistribution to state mainly based on recognition of women working outside the home in paid jobs; No policy for reduction of drudgery http://opendocs.ids.ac.uk/opendocs/bitstream/handle/123456789/2795/bitstre am;jsessionid=26091DD43F6653874EFB06A98CA57843?sequence=1
    • 12. Linking care to HR and WR “Across the world, millions of women still find that poverty is their reward for a lifetime spent caring, and unpaid care provision by women and girls is still treated as an infinite, cost-free resource that fills the gaps when public services are not available or accessible. This report calls for a fundamental shift in this status quo, as part of States’ fundamental human rights obligations.” UN Special Rapporteur on Extreme Poverty and Human Rights – Report on unpaid care work , September 2013
    • 13. Linking care to HR and WR Q: What are the human rights violations that we see due to women’s and girls’ unequal responsibility for unpaid care work The report mentions the following rights violations: •Right to work •Rights at work •Right to education •Right to health •Right to social security – maternity leave •Right to benefit from scientific progress – infrastructure •Right to participation
    • 14. Linking care to HR and WR Q: What are the human rights violations that we see due to women’s and girls’ unequal responsibility for unpaid care work? A Careless Budget
    • 15. Approach – policy asks & strategies for change • • • • Recognise* care and care work Reduce difficult, inefficient tasks Redistribute responsibility for care more equitably - from women to men, and from families to the State/employers Representation of carers in decisionmaking … as a precondition for achieving women’s political, social and economic empowerment, and for addressing poverty and inequality * “Three Rs of Unpaid Work” Prof. Diane Elson 2008
    • 16. Societies provide care through ‘care diamond’* Household …. Market employers State: pays, provides, regulates care NGOs, community & religious groups * S. Razavi 2007
    • 17. Examples of policy asks, interventions 1. Recognize Government census includes care work, unpaid work, time-use surveys Education - appreciation of carers, school curriculum Development actors - (Unpaid) care documented with time use diaries, stories Media– radio spots, TV, posters, street theatre, viral emails 2. Reduce Available, accessible time & labour-saving devices; infrastructure development 3. Redistribute Women to men: men learn cooking, do cleaning, child care, elder care Families to the state/employers: Increased care budgets; employers -childcare, health, maternity, pensions Away from poor women & families: Infrastructure & services in poor communities; domestic workers’ rights 4. Represent Women unpaid carers represent themselves in municipal planning. domestic workers involved in labor rights, or economic planning
    • 18. Any Questions or Comments? REMINDER!! Please type them in and we’ll answer them after the presentations…
    • 19. POLL: Why is care invisible in your context? A: “Care isn’t considered work” ? B: “Care is something women do, it’s ‘natural’ and normal” C: “it happens in the private sphere” D: “too hard to change and/or not easy to measure” E: “it’s not clear what the alternatives are, what can we do?” Write in other reasons!
    • 20. In your context, What might be the first step, or the most effective strategy or policy ask? RECOGNIZE CARE through documenting, publicizing & appreciating REDUCE time, difficulty, labour intensity of CARE tasks REDISTRIBUTE responsibility for CARE from women to men REDISTRIBUTE responsibility & costs from (poor) families to the state / employers Increase REPRESENTATION of CARERS in decision-making & policy A B C D E
    • 21. Communities, Communications & Advocacy What makes a ‘4 Rs’ initiative effective?  Care is a significant issue here – context-specific evidence It’s relevant , appealing & compelling – we should do something. It’s feasible, workable - we can do something. It’s inspiring!
    • 22. Rapid Care Analysis in development programs Oxfam’s Rapid Care Analysis (RCA) is a 1-2 day exercise with focus groups of 12-20 women and men, a first step to addressing care in development. FOUR STEPS  Exploring relationships of care – whom do you care for and who cares for you?  Unpaid and paid work activities of women & men – estimate average weekly hours on care  Context-specific problem statement: - Gender and age analysis of care work; changes in policy, migration, environment; identify ‘most problematic activities’ for women.  Options to reduce and redistribute care: - Community map of infrastructure & services: identify and prioritise options and actions RCA focus group in the Philippines
    • 23. Women’s vs. Men’s work Example from Bangladesh… hours per week 71 hrs 106 hrs Hours per week
    • 24. Advocacy for infrastructure and services Water systems Azerbaijan Bangladesh Colombia Honduras Nicaragua OPT Philippines Sri Lanka Tanzania Electricity Childcare and play facilities Health and social services Technology to Transportation improve and school cleaning and bus cooking
    • 25. Popular communications: AFM network & Oxfam Viral emails: migrant domestic workers’ rights Recognize economic contribution of care work International ‘care chains’ http://www.mujeresdelsur-afm.org.uy/
    • 26. Popular communications Viral emails about migrant domestic workers
    • 27. Getting Care on the Agenda Naming, Framing, Claiming and Programming Naming: Make care visible in policy discussions - Care is important to sustaining any society, yet unequal and concentrated care provision by a few is a problem. So why is it not visible? Framing: Promote care as integral to human wellbeing - Women’s rights, well-being, inequality and poverty, national development, burden? Claiming: Demand government action – Changing policies to recognise, reduce and redistribute unpaid care work through public service delivery, improved regulations on labour conditions etc. Programming: Support more equitable distribution of care responsibilities – Designing programmes that address unpaid care work Eyben, Rosalind. 2013. Getting unpaid care onto the development agendas. IDS In Focus Policy Briefing, Issue 31, January 2013
    • 28. Getting Care on the Agenda: Action Aid example Advocacy happens in many different ways, but here are some of the steps we’ve taken at ActionAid to make care visible: 1.Participatory research and awareness raising amongst women 2.Building the capacity of women and their groups or organisations to value unpaid care work 3.Comparative participatory research with men 4.Women’s groups identify and prioritise their demands for change 5.Presentation of participatory research during community meetings 6.Using research, case studies and women’s testimonies to make care visible to national policy makers 7.Identifying allies, building national coalitions and working with the media ActionAid. 2013. Making Care Visible: Women’s Unpaid Work in Nepal, Nigeria, Uganda and Kenya.
    • 29. IDS Animation: ’WHO CARES’ Unique approach to presenting research on unpaid care work linking women and girl's economic empowerment and their human rights. Unpaid care work underpins the well-being of all societies, rich and poor, but is unrecognised and undervalued by policymakers and legislators. Need for policy change that recognises the role of women and girls in the provision of unpaid care; reduces the drudgery of unpaid care; and redistributes unpaid care work (from women to men, and from the family to communities and the state), thus laying the basis for true gender equality. What does care-sensitive public policy look like? http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VVW858gQHoE
    • 30. Video on unpaid care – advocacy tool
    • 31. Questions, Comments and Answers Questions and answers session

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