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Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.
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Rapid Care Analysis - Oxfam's practical tool for local development programmes. Methodology and initial findings.

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Oxfam's work on care aims to find solutions to the challenge of providing effective care whilst also ensuring women's rights. …

Oxfam's work on care aims to find solutions to the challenge of providing effective care whilst also ensuring women's rights.

Oxfam has developed a Rapid Care Analysis (RCA) to assess context-specific patterns of unpaid household work and care of people. Designed to integrate into existing tools on livelihoods, food, security or vulnerability, it makes visible how care responsibility impacts women's time, health or mobility, and identifies practical interventions to help ensure that women can participate fully in and benefit equally from development programmes.

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  • 1. Rapid Care Analysis for development programs Initial Findings and Methodology Thalia Kidder October 2013
  • 2. WHY CARE?
  • 3. Investing in care… • Has a widespread, long-term, positive impact on wellbeing and development • Is critical to address inequality and vulnerability Page 3
  • 4. Our approach • • • • Recognise* care work Reduce difficult, inefficient tasks Redistribute responsibility for care more equitably - from women to men, and from families to the State/employers Representation of carers in decision-making … as a precondition for achieving women‟s political, social and economic empowerment, and addressing poverty and inequality * “Three Rs of Unpaid Work” Prof. Diane Elson 2008 Page 4
  • 5. Organisational challenges “I don’t know how to start” “I‟m funded to do something else” “It‟s hard to show positive impact” “Care is a culturally sensitive, private issue” “It‟s a long-term, complicated process” ? “My manager and the donor aren‟t convinced” “I want to do advocacy work but I have no evidence” “I have very little time or money…” “Focus on a women’s issue in a mixed group??” Page 5
  • 6. Principles and purpose Rapid Care Analysis (RCA) is a 1-2 day exercise with focus groups of 12-20 women and men, a first step to addressing care in development. RCA is designed to show that „care‟ is …. • • • • • • • • Significant: Collects evidence of the problems; quantitative data, stories and visual outputs Relevant: Improves impact of wider initiatives Feasible: Practical proposals for short term Appealing: Men involved; addressing care is a „societal issue‟ about well-being Compelling: Leads to transformational change Flexible: In a range of cultures/programmes Workable: Simple, user-friendly exercises Inspiring: RCA aims to „open the door‟ – get more people and projects interested in care RCA focus group in the Philippines Page 6
  • 7. RAPID CARE ANALYSIS – WHAT DOES IT LOOK LIKE?
  • 8. STEP 1: Exploring relationships of care • • • What do we mean by „care work‟? Whom do you care for? Who cares for you and others? Page 8
  • 9. STEP 2: Unpaid & paid work activities • • 34 Identify work activities of women and men Estimate average weekly hours spent on types of work Housework and care of family members: 31.3 h/wk Care in others‟ homes: 2.9 h/wk 6.5 6.5 h/wk Unpaid agricultural work for home Agricultural work for market Unpaid care work Colombia: Unpaid community work Women’s 79-hr average work week 21 h/wk Enterprise 9.5 Community activities (village meetings, volunteer health work): 4.6 h/wk Community service (maintaining roads, water ducts and collective crops): 4.8 h/wk 29 8.3 h/wk Page 9
  • 10. STEP 3: Gender roles, changes & problems of care Three focus groups – adapted to the context: • Gender and age analysis of care activities • Changes affecting care provision, e.g. migration, displacement, drought, flood, conflict or government policy changes • Identify most „problematic‟ care activities, especially for women Time burden Limits mobility Affects carer’s health Preparing meals lll ll lll Providing moral support l l l Cleaning House ll l l lll lll l Nursing ill people Page 10
  • 11. STEP 4: Options to reduce and redistribute Community map of infrastructure and services that support care Society provides care with „care diamond‟*: state, market, community, family Examples: • Water supply • Electricity, fuel • Washing facilities • Health services • Schools, childcare • Grain mills, oil presses • Shops • Services for elderly, disabled or HIV+ people • Relatives • Value of care in beliefs * Shara Razavi 2007 Page 11
  • 12. STEP 4: Options to reduce and redistribute care • Identify and prioritize options to address the problems of care provision • Funding or investment needed? • External support? • Social acceptance? • Impact – how much time saved for women? Health benefit? Mobility? Page 12
  • 13. FINDINGS FROM PROGRAMMES USING RAPID CARE ANALYSIS
  • 14. Where we’re doing Rapid Care Analysis Honduras Copan: OCDIH, Nuevo Amanecer, beans and cornflour marketing project Guatemala Rural Women's Alliance, food security campaign Colombia Patugó: Women‟s agricultural enterprise project UK Bristol: Single Parents Action Network, protecting the rights and life chances of single-parent families on job-seeking benefits Nicaragua Chinandega, Chontales, Leon: Rural Women's Coordination Tanzania Kishapu, Shinyanga: Sustainable livelihoods and sisal project OPT Gaza: Food processing and ICT enterprise development projects Azerbaijan Barda: „SMART‟ agricultural livelihoods project and ending violence against women initiative Bangladesh Gaibandha: Gazaria Union, sustainable livelihoods in chillies Philippines Lanao del Sur, Mindanao: Al Mujadilah Development Foundation (AMDF), integral development Sri Lanka Omanthai and Nedunkerney: Sustainable livelihoods in paddy and dairy Page 14
  • 15. Azerbaijan Bangladesh Colombia Honduras Page 15 Women's care work Women's work Men's care work Women's care work Men's work Women's work Men's care work Women's care work Women's work Men's care work Women's care work Men's work Women's work Men's care work Women's care work Men's work Women's work Hours of (care) work per week – women and men 160 140 120 100 80 60 40 20 0 Tanzania
  • 16. Tasks most impacting carers’ mobility, time, health Childcare Collecting Taking care Taking care Collecting fuel and of the of husband water; preparing elderly / extended washing meals family clothes Cleaning Protecting the house (staying at home) Azerbaijan Bangladesh Honduras Nicaragua OPT Philippines Sri Lanka Tanzania Page 16 Moving during flooding
  • 17. Gaps identified in infrastructure and services Water systems Electricity Childcare and Health and Transportation play facilities social services and school bus Azerbaijan Bangladesh Colombia Honduras Nicaragua OPT Philippines Sri Lanka Tanzania Page 17 Technology to improve cleaning and cooking
  • 18. How does care work affect programmes? “Women have 8.5 hrs of care work a day; men do only 1 hr. In the chilli harvest, women work 2-3 hrs more, reducing time for personal care and sleep – usually only 6.5 hrs. If we don‟t reduce or share care tasks, the project cuts into the limited sleep and personal time of the women we are trying to empower."Oxfam staff, Bangladesh “Having less care work for women would definitely increase the productivity of enterprises. Women would be able to earn more money and join activities outside the house if there were childcare available.” RCA participants, OPT Page 18
  • 19. How does care work affect programmes? “Most programmes lose women’s participation because of conflict with care activities. We need to get more support from the community and better infrastructure from authorities.” Oxfam staff, Sri Lanka “Women have to collect water three times a day walking 4km each way, so while men can take sisal harvest to the processing plant twice a day, women can only go once! We won't reach our desired goals on economic and gender justice if we ignore unequal care work.” Oxfam staff, Tanzania Page 19
  • 20. Proposals and next steps – practical / quick • Technology to decrease fuel and time needed for meal preparation and cooking (corn mill, dough machine, improved/gas stoves, refrigerators, pressure cooker ) – Bangladesh, Colombia, Honduras, OPT • Household water systems – Bangladesh, Philippines, Tanzania • Technology to decrease time cleaning and washing clothes (drainage, washing machines, dryers, vacuums) – Azerbaijan, Bangladesh, Colombia, OPT, Sri Lanka • Car to decrease time taken to buy food shopping – OPT • Recreational activities and psychosocial support from friends and family to lower stress levels – Colombia RCA focus group in Azerbaijan Page 20
  • 21. Proposals and next steps – gender relations RCA focus group in Tanzania • Sharing care work with partners – Bangladesh, OPT, Philippines, Sri Lanka • Sharing care work with other family members – Colombia, Honduras, OPT • Cooking lessons for men – Philippines • Household discussions on sharing care work – Colombia, Honduras, Philippines, Sri Lanka • Community discussions, workshops and campaigns on sharing care work – Honduras, Philippines, Sri Lanka Page 21
  • 22. Proposals and next steps – advocacy • Installing water pumps – Azerbaijan, Philippines • Installing electricity – Honduras, Philippines, Sri Lanka • Providing childcare services – Azerbaijan, Colombia, Honduras, OPT, Philippines • Improving healthcare and sanitation services – OPT, Philippines • Providing public parks where children can spend time safely – OPT • Building capacity to improve and enforce laws on labour and women’s rights – OPT • Providing a bus service to take children to and from school – Sri Lanka • Raising awareness on family planning – Bangladesh RCA focus group in Colombia Page 22
  • 23. Participants’ comments on Rapid Care Analysis “Women are really overburdened; something has to be done about this” – Imam, Mindanao, Philippines “We are thankful to have seen and understood the unequal contribution of men and women at household level.” Men‟s group, Philippines “We need to include young people, boys and girls, in the exercises.” Bangladesh, Azerbaijan “In the community map we need to capture danger – mobility is restricted due to land mines, and from staying in the house to avoid theft.” Sri Lanka, Honduras “Some participants have managed to renegotiate care activities with their husbands and family members.” Colombia Page 23
  • 24. Find out more… www.oxfam.org.uk/care Co-authors RCA Methodology & Guidance: Thalia Kidder and Carine Pionetti. Communications: Imogen Davies Contributors: Valeria Esquivel, Rosa Garwood, Nupur Kukrety, Roxanne Murrell, Hector Ortega, Catrina Pickering, Rosa Pasquier Urbina, Laura Phelps, Felipe Ramiro, Lauren Ravon, Kate Raworth, Adriana Rodriguez, Jo Rowlands, Hugo Sintes, Ines Smyth, Caroline Sweetman, Jo Villanueva, Martin Walsh, and Phillipa Young. For reports also thanks to: Norul Amin, Ala„a Eid, Sonali Gunasekera, Maite Matheu, Gunel Mehdiyeva, Celeste Molina, Zahria Mapandi, Shija Msikula, Jing Pura and Shanmugaratnam Senthuran. Page 24 Photo credits: Oxfam.
  • 25. FOR A POWERPOINT VERSION OF THIS PRESENTATION PLEASE EMAIL THALIA KIDDER: TKIDDER@OXFAM.ORG.UK

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