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Health Inequalities in Scotland: looking beyond the blame game - Gerry McCartney and Chik Collins
 

Health Inequalities in Scotland: looking beyond the blame game - Gerry McCartney and Chik Collins

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Dr Gerry McCartney, head of the Public Health Observatory Division at NHS Health Scotland, and Dr Chik Collins, senior lecturer in the School of Social Sciences at the University of the West of ...

Dr Gerry McCartney, head of the Public Health Observatory Division at NHS Health Scotland, and Dr Chik Collins, senior lecturer in the School of Social Sciences at the University of the West of Scotland, talk about health inequalities.

Stephen Boyd, Assistant Secretary of the Scottish Trade Unions Congress, talks about how the Scottish economy works.

The Whose Economy? seminars, organised by Oxfam Scotland and the University of the West of Scotland, brought together experts to look at recent changes in the Scottish economy and their impact on Scotland's most vulnerable communities.

Held over winter and spring 2010-11 in Edinburgh, Inverness, Glasgow and Stirling, the series posed the question of what economy is being created in Scotland and, specifically, for whom?

To find out more and view other Whose Economy? papers, presentations and videos visit:
http://www.oxfamblogs.org/ukpovertypost/whose-economy-seminar-series-winter-2010-spring-2011/

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    Health Inequalities in Scotland: looking beyond the blame game - Gerry McCartney and Chik Collins Health Inequalities in Scotland: looking beyond the blame game - Gerry McCartney and Chik Collins Presentation Transcript

    • Health inequalities in Scotland: looking beyond the blame game March 2011 Gerry McCartney Chik Collins
    • Health: the blame game
    • The Black report
      • Artefact
      • Health selection
      • Behavioural or cultural
      • Structural
    • Historical international trends in life expectancy Data extracted from the Human Mortality Database for all available nations: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Belarus, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Czech Republic, Denmark, East Germany, England & Wales, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Iceland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Scotland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, West Germany, Ukraine & USA.
    • Historical international trends in life expectancy Data extracted from the Human Mortality Database for all available nations: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Belarus, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Czech Republic, Denmark, East Germany, England & Wales, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Iceland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Scotland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, West Germany, Ukraine & USA.
    • Higher overall mortality than comparable nations Data extracted from the Human Mortality Database for: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Chile, Denmark, England & Wales, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Iceland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Netherlands, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Norway, Portugal, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan & West Germany.
    • Higher overall mortality than comparable nations Scotland Data extracted from the Human Mortality Database for: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Chile, Denmark, England & Wales, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Iceland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Netherlands, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Norway, Portugal, Scotland, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan & West Germany.
    • Higher overall mortality than comparable nations Data extracted from the Human Mortality Database for: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Canada, Chile, Denmark, England & Wales, Finland, France, Germany, Ireland, Iceland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Luxembourg, Netherlands, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Norway, Portugal, Scotland, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, West Germany & USA. USA Scotland
    • Higher overall mortality than comparable nations USA Slovenia Scotland Czech R. Poland Slovakia Hungary Estonia Bulgaria Lithuania Latvia Belarus Ukraine Russia Data extracted from the Human Mortality Database for: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Belarus, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Czech Republic, Denmark, East Germany, England & Wales, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Iceland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Scotland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, West Germany, Ukraine & USA.
    • Higher overall mortality than comparable nations Portugal N. Ireland Scotland Data extracted from the Human Mortality Database for: Australia, Austria, Belgium, Belarus, Bulgaria, Canada, Chile, Czech Republic, Denmark, East Germany, England & Wales, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Hungary, Ireland, Iceland, Israel, Italy, Japan, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Netherlands, New Zealand, Northern Ireland, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Russia, Scotland, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, Taiwan, West Germany, Ukraine & USA.
    • Source: Alastair H Leyland, Ruth Dundas,Philip McLoone & F Andrew Boddy. Inequalities in mortality in Scotland 1981-2001. Glasgow, MRC SPHSU, 2007. Glasgow City Inverclyde West Dunbartonshire Dundee City Renfrewshire Eilean Siar North Ayrshire North Lanarkshire All cause death rates, men 0-64y, 2001
    • Each stop on the Argyll line travelling East represents a drop of 1.7 years in male life expectancy Jordanhill Charing Cross Hyndland Partick Anderston Exhibition Centre CENTRAL Argyll St. Bridgeton QUEEN STREET Govan Hillhead St George’s Cross Buchanan Street Life expectancy data refers to 2001-5 and was extracted from the GCPH community health and well-being profiles. Adapted from the SPT travel map by Gerry McCartney. Males - 75.8y Females - 83.1y St Enoch Males - 61.9y Females - 74.6y Ibrox Cessnock
    • Toxic policies and toxic politics
      • The UK was exposed to an intensity of neoliberalism not seen elsewhere in Europe
      • Deindustrialisation was managed and mitigated in other countries
      • Parallels with transitions in Eastern Europe and USA
      • Accommodation in Scotland not seen in England
      • Linked to alienation, disempowerment and democratic deficit
      Sources: Collins C, McCartney G. Is a ‘political attack’ an explanation for the ‘Scottish Effect’ in health outcomes? . International Journal of Health Services (in press). Stuckler D, King L, McKee M. Mass privatisation and the post-communist mortality crisis: a cross-national analysis. Lancet 2009;373:399-407. Boyle M, McWilliams C, Rice G. The spatialities of actually existing neoliberalism in Glasgow, 1977 to present. Geografiska Annaler; series B, Human Geography 2008;90:313-25. Phillips J. The industrial politics of devolution: Scotland in the 1960s and 1970s. Manchester: Manchester University Press; 2008.
    • Health inequalities are not inevitable… Ratio of standardised mortality ratios (0-64years), UK local authorities, 1921-2007 (Thomas, Dorling and Smith, 2010)
    • Why we do care and why we should care
      • Human loss
      • Injustice
      • In everyone’s interests
    • Conclusion
      • Our health is determined by the type of society we live in
      • Toxic policies and toxic politics are endemic in Scotland leading to entrenched income, wealth and power inequalities
      • Equalizing institutions are constantly under attack
      • Health and inequalities have changed in other times and other countries when the politics and policies have
      • We should care about inequalities because of our humanity, the injustice and in self-interest
      • It is time to create a change
    • To view all the papers in the Whose Economy series click here To view all the videos and presentations from the seminars click here