Gender mainstreaming and gender analysis in work addressing risk reduction: Capability and Vulnerability Analysis (CVA)

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Understanding how gender relations shape women’s and men’s lives is critical to disaster risk reduction (DRR). This is because women’s and men’s different roles, responsibilities, and access to …

Understanding how gender relations shape women’s and men’s lives is critical to disaster risk reduction (DRR). This is because women’s and men’s different roles, responsibilities, and access to resources influence how each will be affected by different hazards, and how they will cope with and recover from disaster. This presentation contains a tool to examine capacities and vulnerabilities in or after a particular crisis or disaster, or in the context of long-term climate change. This presentation is part of Oxfam GB's Gender and Disaster Risk Reduction training pack available at www.oxfam.org.uk/genderdrrpack.

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  • 1. Gender and disaster risk reduction Gender mainstreaming and gender analysis in work addressing risk reduction Capacity and Vulnerability Analysis (CVA) PowerPoint 2.1 Gender and Disaster Risk Reduction : A training pack
  • 2. CVA: background
    • A tool to examine capacities and vulnerabilities in or after a particular crisis or disaster, or in the context of long-term climate change.
    • CVA helps to:
    • identify vulnerable groups
    • identify the factors that make them vulnerable and show how they are affected
    • assess their needs and capacities
    • empower and mobilize vulnerable communities/groups
    • ensure that projects, programmes, and policies address their needs through targeted interventions or prevention and mitigation of potentially adverse impacts
  • 3. CVA: uses
    • In different contexts : poverty reduction, sectoral development, disaster management, climate change adaptation
    • At different levels : national or programme to community and household
    • with different functions: scoping or screening, programme or project design, research, baseline studies, monitoring and evaluation
  • 4. CVA: limitations
    • The CVA tool is less useful in analysing changes over time:
    • the gradual, insidious impacts of climate change
    • how climate change is altering hazard profiles (i.e. the intensity, frequency, seasonality, extent of forewarning, etc. of climate-related events)
  • 5. The CVA matrix see handout 2.2 Vulnerabilities Capacities Physical / material e.g. environmental degradation, unsafe infrastructure e.g productive resources and skills Social / organisational e.g. low level of education, vulnerable occupations e.g. strengths of social organisation under threat Motivational / attitudinal community’s views of its ability to create change – hindrances community’s views of its ability to create change – strengths Political / institutional structures, decision-making processes and power relations which inhibit response structures, decision-making processes and power relations which aid response
  • 6.
    • Case study questions
    • Are there any links between the examples for capacity and vulnerability? How do they interact?
    • Are there any links between the categories (physical, social, attitudinal, and political)? How do they interact?
    • What did you find easy or difficult in the task?
    • Where are the gaps in your CVA profile?
    • How and where could you get additional information?
    see handout 1.1
  • 7. Developing CVA further
    • To make the analysis more useful, it is possible to incorporate:
    • disaggregation by gender
    • disaggregation by other social differences
    • interaction between categories
    • different scales or levels of application
    • The CVA matrix can be repeated (e.g. before and after a project) to look at social change and to evaluate impact
  • 8. This presentation is part of Gender and disaster risk reduction: A training pack available in full from www.oxfam.org.uk/genderdrrpack Oxfam GB, July 2011