Arm resilient agr arm

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Arm resilient agr arm

  1. 1. RESILIENCE BUILDING MECIS ECONOMIC JUSTICE COMMUNITY 0F PRACTICE LEARNING WORKSHOP ARMENIA TEAM MARCH 17-20, 2014
  2. 2. Page 2 FACILITATING PRODUCTIVE AND RESILIENCE SMALLHOLDER AGRICULTURE DEVELOPMENT IN ARMENIA NUMBER OF BENEFICIARIES: 6000 (3600 women and 2500 men) LOCATION – Vayots Dzor and Tavush regions of Armenia STAFF AND PARTNER NAMES: OXFAM Economic Justice team (5 persons) BSC – Business Support Centre SCVIC – Scientific Centre for Vegetable and Industrial Crop PROJECT DURATION; 2010-2017
  3. 3. Page 3 SECTION I: CONTEXT ANALYSIS Armenia Population: 3.1 million GDP per capita $5,279 Gender inequality ranking (out of 146): 60 Rural Poverty rate: 37% Number of farmers: 340,000 Country challenges: • Big number of small-holder farmers, • Unfavourable weather conditions • Weak involvement of private sector, • Lack of sufficient natural resources, • Lack of market access • Lack of access to agricultural services, • Lack of access to extension services, • Lack of access to financial resources (credits, micro-credits)
  4. 4. Page 4 SECTION II: MAIN INTERVENTIONS • Strengthening Resilience of Smallholder Agriculture in Tavush and Vayots Dzor regions • Creation of adaptive rural agricultural model (greenhouses with drip irrigation), • Successfully piloted the Pre-Vulnerability Assessment in Tavush and Vayots Dzor regions • Establishment of community based business and social enterprises, • Establishment of Regional Farm School (Tavush region), • Coops/smallholder farmers’ access to Micro-credit/zero interest loans (500-600 GBP;/ farmers (100 GBP), (64% of loan takers are women), • Women Economic Empowerment and Leadership • Establishment of women cooperatives in Vayots Dzor and Tavush regions, • Establishment of business and social enterprises • Food Female Hero/GROW Campaigns • Enterprise Development Project • Construction of Food and Berries Processing Plants in Ayrum community, • Increasing the role of women farmers in food value chain through sourcing berries and fruits from poor women collectors, • Creating employment opportunities for about 60 people, particularly women, • Sourcing products from neighboring 10 communities (with about 1800 collectors 70% of which are women) • Advocacy through multi-stakeholder alliances/platforms • Intensive work with Agricultural Alliance and DRR National Platform
  5. 5. Page 5 SECTION III: STAKEHOLDER ANALYSIS • Engaging multi-stakeholder alliances/platforms (AA, DRR National Platform, CSPN) • Influencing national policies on Agricultural development/Food Security and Agricultural Risk reduction, • Generating recommendations for policy change, • Public campaigns and events, • Creating linkages between private sector and smallholder farmers • Mapping private sector companies in Armenia, • Promoting marketing capacities of cooperatives (forwarding contracts, promo materials, booklets, website), • Sensitization of private sector (national processors, big traders) to source farmer coops’ produce
  6. 6. Page 6 SECTION IV: ACHIEVEMENTS • 30% increase of income of smallholder farmers, particularly women (60%) through involvement in coops’ enterprises • Increased yield of smallholder farmers (cooperatives) • 18 agri-coops established in 18 rural communities inTav.& VD) • Access to high-value adaptive and resilient crops (tomato, cucumber, bean, pepper, broccoli, cherry tomato etc), • Access to innovative seeds breeding, cultivation and reproduction technologies, • Available capacity for production of high value vegetable crops and seeds/seedlings breeding(reproduction) • Improved access to knowledge/education and new agricultural practices on soil husbandry in resource scarce communities through farm school • Available pre-vulnerability assessment data for target communities • Joint advocacy through Agricultural Alliance/ DRR Platform (e.g. Agricultural Insurance) • Establishment of (attractive) replicable rural business model (EDP)
  7. 7. Page 7 SECTION V: SUCCESS AND CHALLENGES SUCCESS  Creation of a Social Investment Fund for allocations for community social projects  Availability of seeds reproduction  Established relations with SCVIC and extension services/RASC (Regional Agricultural Support Centre)  Successful advocacy for development of Agricultural Risk Reduction Project  Established paid employment mechanism for cooperative members (5-6 persons per cultivation season),  Attracting new funding opportunities for EDP/Leveraging (CARE, Orange) CHALLENGES  Cooperative management – Need for improving the system of internal structured management and more delegation of tasks among all members,  Marketing knowledge – Need for developing capacities of the cooperatives in marketing of their produce and proper business planning (agricultural sale)  Need for additional funding resources for EDP,
  8. 8. Page 8 SECTION VI: LEARNING AND RECOMMENDATIONS • More intensive work with agricultural cooperatives to promote group work and social corporative thinking, • Build capacities of cooperatives in financial management (allocation of income/profit etc), • Present the efficiency and affordability of piloted models to make it more attractive for stakeholders, • Advocacy for replication of rural community based adaptive and business models at national, provincial and local levels, • Work on government’s existing policies and commitments (both national and international),

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