German Post-Expressionism I:

Dada and Die Neue Sachlichkeit
(The New Objectivity)
Janet Owen Driggs
Art 114C-Presentation...
World War One: 19141918
42 million soldiers, 52%
killed or wounded. 7
million civilians killed.
GERMANY IS DEFEATED
1918: Revolution

GERMANY IS DEFEATED

3 Million disabled veterans
return from war2010:
Reparations
1918: Revolution

GERMANY IS DEFEATED

1919-2010: Reparations

3 Million disabled veterans
return from war2010:
Reparation...
1918: Revolution

GERMANY IS DEFEATED

1919-2010: Reparations

3 Million disabled veterans
return from war2010:
Reparation...
1918: Revolution

GERMANY IS DEFEATED

1919-2010: Reparations

3 Million disabled veterans
return from war2010:
Reparation...
1918: Revolution

GERMANY IS DEFEATED

1919-2010: Reparations

3 Million disabled veterans
return from war2010:
Reparation...
1918: Revolution

GERMANY IS DEFEATED

1919-2010: Reparations

Economic collapse

3 Million disabled veterans
return from ...
1918: Revolution

GERMANY IS DEFEATED

1919-2010: Reparations

Economic collapse

3 Million disabled veterans
return from ...
George GROSZ (1893–1959)
The Hero, c. 1936
Lithograph

Rudolf SCHLICHTER (1890–1955)
Woman With Tie (1923)
Oil on canvas
German Post-Expressionism
• Grew out of WW1.
• Rejected the Expressionist’s (“helpless”)
focus on personal angst and colle...
Die Neue Sachlichkeit

Dada

• Artists worked in a realistic style in
contrast to the pre-war emphasis on
Expressionism an...
Die Neue Sachlichkeit
Artists rejected the self-involvement and
romantic idealism of the Expressionists.
Right: George GRO...
George Grosz: Pillars of Society detail (1926)
Otto Dix: Metropolis (1928)
The New Objectivity is characterized
by a naturalistic style combined with a
cynical and socially critical stance.

Otto D...
Otto DIX: Three Wenches, detail (1926)
George GROSZ: Daum Marries
her Pedantic Automaton
George, John Heartfield is Very
Glad of It
(1920) Watercolor, pencil, pe...
Otto DIX (1891–1969)
Café Couple (1921)
Watercolor and pencil on paper
20 x 16.2 in.
Otto DIX:
Skin Graft (1924)
Etching, aquatint, and drypoint.
7.8 x 5.7 in.
Otto DIX: Skat Players (1920)
Oil on canvas with photomontage
and collage. 43.3 x 34.2 in
Otto DIX : The Skat Players, detail (1920)
How are these works
OBJECTIVE?
They’re grotesque – aren’t
the artists exaggerating for
effect, just like the
Expressionist...
"The Neue Sachlichkeit is Americanism, the cult of the
objective, the hard fact, the predilection for functional
work, pro...
1.
2.
3.

1.

2.

3.

“The Tin Noses Shop,” est. 1916, London
Veterans march for pensions, Berlin, 1919
Man with no hands ...
August SANDER:
Secretary at West German Radio, Cologne
(1931)
“None of these men were satisfied with just an
ordinary woman…they all desired this ‘New Woman’
... But they more or less ...
NEXT WEEK: DADA

HOMEWORK:

1. Read Marinetti’s Futurist Manifesto for Oct 23
2. Ongoing Museum Paper. Due Nov 6
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Modern Art History-German Post Expressionism1-The New Objectivity

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Modern Art History for beginners. This presentation is part one of a pair that address German Post Expressionism. It considers The New Objectivity and focuses on the work of Dix and Grosz.

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Modern Art History-German Post Expressionism1-The New Objectivity

  1. 1. German Post-Expressionism I: Dada and Die Neue Sachlichkeit (The New Objectivity) Janet Owen Driggs Art 114C-Presentation 13
  2. 2. World War One: 19141918 42 million soldiers, 52% killed or wounded. 7 million civilians killed.
  3. 3. GERMANY IS DEFEATED
  4. 4. 1918: Revolution GERMANY IS DEFEATED 3 Million disabled veterans return from war2010: Reparations
  5. 5. 1918: Revolution GERMANY IS DEFEATED 1919-2010: Reparations 3 Million disabled veterans return from war2010: Reparations
  6. 6. 1918: Revolution GERMANY IS DEFEATED 1919-2010: Reparations 3 Million disabled veterans return from war2010: Reparations
  7. 7. 1918: Revolution GERMANY IS DEFEATED 1919-2010: Reparations 3 Million disabled veterans return from war2010: Reparations 1922-1923: Hyperinflation
  8. 8. 1918: Revolution GERMANY IS DEFEATED 1919-2010: Reparations 3 Million disabled veterans return from war2010: Reparations 1922-1923: Hyperinflation
  9. 9. 1918: Revolution GERMANY IS DEFEATED 1919-2010: Reparations Economic collapse 3 Million disabled veterans return from war2010: Reparations 1922-1923: Hyperinflation
  10. 10. 1918: Revolution GERMANY IS DEFEATED 1919-2010: Reparations Economic collapse 3 Million disabled veterans return from war2010: Reparations 1922-1923: Hyperinflation Social and political turmoil
  11. 11. George GROSZ (1893–1959) The Hero, c. 1936 Lithograph Rudolf SCHLICHTER (1890–1955) Woman With Tie (1923) Oil on canvas
  12. 12. German Post-Expressionism • Grew out of WW1. • Rejected the Expressionist’s (“helpless”) focus on personal angst and collective anxiety. • Artists wanted to express outrage and encourage political action. Above: John Heartfield Adolf The Superman: Swallows Gold and Spouts Junk (1932) Left: Otto Dix: Café Couple (1921). Watercolor & ink on paper.
  13. 13. Die Neue Sachlichkeit Dada • Artists worked in a realistic style in contrast to the pre-war emphasis on Expressionism and Abstraction. • Dada rejected reason and logic and embraced irrationality and nonsense. • Better translated as 'New Matter-offactness’ or 'New Resignation.’ “We have had enough of the intelligent movements…What we want now is spontaneity.” • Ended in 1933 with the rise of Adolf Hitler, who labeled it “degenerate.” Otto DIX: Portrait of the Journalist Sylvia von Harden (1926) Tristan Tzara, 1925 Hugo BALL’s sound poem Karawane, 1916
  14. 14. Die Neue Sachlichkeit Artists rejected the self-involvement and romantic idealism of the Expressionists. Right: George GROSZ: Pillars of Society (1926) "Come out of your rooms, even if you find it an effort, pull down your individual barriers, let yourselves be caught up by the ideas of working people and help them in the struggle against a corrupt society.” Georg Grosz, 1921 George GROSZ: Pillars of Society (1926) Oil on canvas, 42.5 x 78.7 in.
  15. 15. George Grosz: Pillars of Society detail (1926)
  16. 16. Otto Dix: Metropolis (1928)
  17. 17. The New Objectivity is characterized by a naturalistic style combined with a cynical and socially critical stance. Otto DIX: Three Wenches (1926)
  18. 18. Otto DIX: Three Wenches, detail (1926)
  19. 19. George GROSZ: Daum Marries her Pedantic Automaton George, John Heartfield is Very Glad of It (1920) Watercolor, pencil, pen and collage on cardboard
  20. 20. Otto DIX (1891–1969) Café Couple (1921) Watercolor and pencil on paper 20 x 16.2 in.
  21. 21. Otto DIX: Skin Graft (1924) Etching, aquatint, and drypoint. 7.8 x 5.7 in.
  22. 22. Otto DIX: Skat Players (1920) Oil on canvas with photomontage and collage. 43.3 x 34.2 in
  23. 23. Otto DIX : The Skat Players, detail (1920)
  24. 24. How are these works OBJECTIVE? They’re grotesque – aren’t the artists exaggerating for effect, just like the Expressionists?
  25. 25. "The Neue Sachlichkeit is Americanism, the cult of the objective, the hard fact, the predilection for functional work, professional conscientiousness, and usefulness.” Dennis Crockett German Post-expressionism: The Art of the Great Disorder, 1918-1924 (1999)
  26. 26. 1. 2. 3. 1. 2. 3. “The Tin Noses Shop,” est. 1916, London Veterans march for pensions, Berlin, 1919 Man with no hands or feet working a lathe, Germany 1915
  27. 27. August SANDER: Secretary at West German Radio, Cologne (1931)
  28. 28. “None of these men were satisfied with just an ordinary woman…they all desired this ‘New Woman’ ... But they more or less brutally rejected the notion that they too had to adopt new attitudes…This led to these truly Strinbergian dramas that typified the private lives of these men.” —from undated notes found among Hannah Höch’s possessions.
  29. 29. NEXT WEEK: DADA HOMEWORK: 1. Read Marinetti’s Futurist Manifesto for Oct 23 2. Ongoing Museum Paper. Due Nov 6

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