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Running Dry: Smart Water and Leak Detection
 

Running Dry: Smart Water and Leak Detection

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presented by Steven Windsor in Asia Water Week 2013, Manila 11-15 March 2013

presented by Steven Windsor in Asia Water Week 2013, Manila 11-15 March 2013

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    Running Dry: Smart Water and Leak Detection Running Dry: Smart Water and Leak Detection Presentation Transcript

    • Running Dry: Smart Waterand Leak DetectionSteven WindsorMarch 2013March 20131 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • Agenda Global Survey: Water stress barriers & answersGlobal Survey: Water stress, barriers & answers Defining “smart water” The analytical foundationy Detecting leaks – reducing losses The business case2 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • Survey DetailsThe Economist Intelligence Unit conducted a survey of 244 seniorwater utility executives across the ten countries under review.All respondents hailed from the management function of theirbusinesses, with close to one-half (45%) consisting of C-suitetiexecutives.Organizations of all sizes were polled: 13% have annual revenue inexcess of US$1bn, while 40% are firms with under US$250m inrevenuerevenue.Nearly one-half (48%) are owned by either the state or a localmunicipality; the balance are privately owned, barring 6% whichoperate as public private partnershipsoperate as public-private partnerships.3 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • Increased water stress is a foregone conclusionFor most water utilities, increased water stress by 2030 isa foregone conclusion.About four in ten executives (39%) polled for this reportthink that, given current trends, national water demandgin their countries will outstrip supply by 2030.A further 54% think such a risk is moderately likely ButA further 54% think such a risk is moderately likely. Butthe nature of such stress varies hugely, depending onlocal circumstances.•4 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • Increased water productivity is the coreTo ensure sufficient supplies, utilities are making wide-ranging productivity improvements—everything fromplugging leaks to recycling more waterplugging leaks to recycling more water.Investments are rising as well.gAcross the ten countries polled, 93% of respondents saythey are increasing their investment in water productionfacilities.facilities.More than one in five (22%) utilities surveyed will increasei t t b 15% i th t thinvestment by 15% or more in the next three years.5 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • Wasteful consumer behavior is largest barrierAcross much of the world, water flows out of taps at almost no cost tothe user.Nearly half (45%) of utilities—especially in developed markets—seethis as their biggest barrier to progress, while a further 33% believethat tariffs are too low to stimulate greater investment..gIn developing countries, a lack of capital for investment tops the list ofconcerns (selected by 41%), while worries over climate change areconcerns (selected by 41%), while worries over climate change areclose behind (38%).Regulatory difficulties along with persistent difficulties in attracting theRegulatory difficulties, along with persistent difficulties in attracting theright skills, further deepen the challenge.6 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • A far greater focus on demand management isexpectedexpectedThe historical response to rising water demand has beenThe historical response to rising water demand has beento build up supply and distribution networks, but muchmore emphasis is now being put on cutting water use.From both a strategic and technological perspective, newmetering and usage awareness programmes top themetering and usage awareness programmes top themeasures utilities believe will help reduce use.Such measures are effective: research suggests a 10-15% average drop in usage once a meter is installed.7 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • The water industry is experiencing a quietboom in innovationboom in innovationWorldwide, utilities are experimenting with newtechniques such as improved desalination and aquifertechniques, such as improved desalination and aquiferrecharging methods.Desalination innovations are appearing in far-flunglocations, from California to Queensland.Network sensors and smart meters, which often link backto consumers’ smart phones are helping utilities both toto consumers smart phones, are helping utilities both tomoderate demand and to find costly leaks moreaccurately.Nonetheless, more than one in three (36%) utilitiessurveyed say they are generally unaware of theinnovation options available to them.8 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.o at o opt o s a a ab e to t e
    • Water InterdependenciesSustainability & Climate• Water & Waste CycleGrowingPopulation densityGrowingEnergy needsGrowingPersonal Mobility• Water & Waste Cycle• Energy conservation• EmissionsmanagementGrowingUrbanizationUncertainFuel SupplyGrowingAging SocietyUrbanization & Mobility• Smart Homes• Smart TransportAl t dUrbanizationFuel Supply Aging Society• Always connectedEnergy & ResourcesGrowingCommodity PricesGrowingResource needsGrowingGlobal Warming• Smart Grid & Meters• Renewable energy• Demand management9 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • The history of smart waterFor the past 20 years, water monitoring has included real-time control and supervision, and advanced hydrologicalmodellingmodelling.But technology and needs have grown We now have:But technology, and needs, have grown. We now have:• Ubiquitous availability of IT and Communication resources• Continous deployment of advanced sensing and actuators• More data enabling new services and actionable insights• Constantly increasing demand and expansion of distribution• Regulatory compliance of water quality and sustainability and CO2emissions,• Need CAPEX/OPEX balancing and long-term investment & maintenanceplanning10 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • Defining Smart Water: A System of SystemsNetwork: Sensors, Meters and actuators deployed throughout the gridCommunication: Low latency, Multi-Modal, real-time communication linksData Acquisition: Validation, supervision and complex event processingInformation: Dashboards of Key Performance Indicators, TrackersAsset & Service: Maintenance strategies, field service and schedule optimizationSimulation: What-If scenario analysis weather network planningSimulation: What If scenario analysis, weather, network planningSense Data Inform Act11 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • Setting The Analytical FoundationIntegratedAnalyticApplicationsIntegratedAnalyticApplicationsAny Data,Any SourceAny Data,Any SourceFull Range ofAnalyticsFull Range ofAnalyticsOn TabletOn MobileOn DeviceOn TabletOn MobileOn Device12 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • Defining The Analytical ObjectivesBusiness PerformanceCustomerBusiness and Revenue ManagementOperational PerformanceCustomer SatisfactionReduced CostStructuresSustainableAssetsOperationPerformanceInfrastructureReliability Compliance & GrowthEmployeeEngagementSustainableBusinessDefining the dashboard for the different lines of business:• Customer: Interactions, satisfaction, revenue, days sales outstandingS i N b f l i t i l ti l tiNetwork Performance• Service: Number of complaints, issue resolution, escalations• Finance: Cost recovery, plan/actual deviation, project performance• Operation: Response time, schedule adherence, service complaints• Maintenance: Availability, pipe breaks, Unaccounted for Water, order completion13 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • Defining The Reference ModelWhat?  Activity Reference Model(Simplified example)Leveraging thefull Range ofWater UtilityLeveraging thefull Range ofWater UtilityActivitiesUnreportedTimely Interval Reads?typeWhat % normal reads?How much?  Avg completion time? (Simplified example)Data SourcesData SourcesPerformancePlaned / actualDevicesMeasurementsUnreported usage?Installation What % without measurements?Most frequent exceptions?Event type distribution?Events &ExceptionsNetworkModelstatus? SCADAReal‐TimeTechnologiesRelational Multi-Dimensional UnstructuredTechnologies14 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • Moving from Insights to ActionContentLeveraging thefull Range ofWater UtilityLeveraging thefull Range ofWater UtilityData SourcesData SourcesToolsToolsUnstructuredAnalyticsReporting &AnalysisModeling &PlanningPredictiveAnalytics15 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • Understanding the Water BalanceBilled AuthorizedBilled Metered Consumption RevenueW tAuthorizedConsumptionConsumption WaterBilled Unmetered ConsumptionUnbilled AuthorizedConsumptionUnbilled Metered ConsumptionUnbilled Unmetered ConsumptionSystemInputVolume Non‐RevenueWaterW LCommercial / ApparentLossesUnauthorized ConsumptionCustomer Meter Inaccuracies,Data, Billing and Accounting ErrorsWater LossesPhysical / RealLossesLeakage on Transmission and Distribution MainsLeakage and Overflows at ReservoirsLeakage on service connections up to meteringNon‐Revenue Water = System Input Volume – Billed Authorized Consumption16 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • Reasons for Apparent LossesCurrent Annual Apparent LossesEconomical Level• Customer meter inaccuracies• Unauthorized consumption and  Economical LevelUnavoidable pillegal connections, theft and fraud• Data analysis errors between hi t i l t l d billi d t Apparent Losseshistorical, actual and billing data• Data collection and transfer errors between meter and billing systemAnalytical Insight Transforming Data into Reduction of Apparent Losses17 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • Managing Real LossesPotentially Recoverable Real LossesEconomical Level of• Active leakage  management• Improving speed and quality of ALR Economical Level of Real LossesUnavoidable Improving  speed and quality of ALRAwareness, Location, Repair• Optimization of the pressure t i th t Real Lossesmanagement in the system• Increased asset reliability and economical maintenance strategygyAnalytical Insight Transforming Data into Reduction of Real Losses18 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • Strategies for Reducing LossesRationalizing the criteria and priorities toward a NRW reduction strategy:• Economics: Determining the cost of NRW versus the cost of waterP A t d l i f b i d b t ti• Process: Assessment and analysis of business processes and best practices• Integration: Integration of business, engineering and operational areas• Data Analytics: Transforming data silos into actionable business insightsCumulative water lost over timeNRW – Cost Assessment ALR – Process AssessmentEconomicLevel of NRWTotal Cost = Cost of Water lost +Cost of NRW ManagementC t f t l tCumulative water lost over timeofWaterLostCost of water lostCost of NRWManagementNRWCostsAwareness Location RepairVolumeoTime19 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • DMA – District Metering AreaImproving the Network TopologyFROM: Open Water Network SystemWater is fed from different water treatment plants into an interconnectedWater is fed from different water treatment plants into an interconnectedpipe network. NRW can only be approximated for the entire system.TO: Zoned Water Network Systems (DMA)The pipe network is divided into smaller and hydraulically isolated zones whichallow a more accurate and manageable NRW calculation.DMA d i id tiDMA design consideration• Size of the DMA (number of connections, pipe length, etc.)• Network configuration (number of flow meters, number of valves)• Topographic features (urban, rural, ground level variations, etc.)• Data Loggers (flows, pressure, legitimate night flows, sonar, etc.)• Establishing and calibrating a hydrological flow model20 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • NRW: Active ManagementSCADA / GISSCADA / GIS NETWORKNETWORK ERP / EAM/ CISERP / EAM/ CISSCADA / GISSCADA / GISTelemetry FeedsDispatch TrackingStorm and WeatherHydrologic / Pressure DataNETWORKNETWORKWork & Service PerformanceGrid Model / Geo-CodingHydrological/Pressure ModelDistrict Metering AreaERP / EAM/ CISERP / EAM/ CISCustomer Billing RecordsMeter Data and LocationLink Consumption & AddressFinancial & Tariff InformationWater Cycle and Water Balance InsightHydrologic / Pressure DataSanitation levelsValve/Pump/Reservoir FeedsDistrict Metering AreaLoggers & Asset conditionsMeter testing & CertificationFinancial & Tariff InformationAsset History & PerformanceWater Cycle and Water Balance InsightG SG S SCADA / W thSCADA / W thModelUpdatesReal-TimeGISCADPlanning SystemManual / One-LinesGISCADPlanning SystemManual / One-LinesSCADA / WeatherField Operations & MobileEnterprise Asset PerformanceGrid Sensors / Valve ControlsSCADA / WeatherField Operations & MobileEnterprise Asset PerformanceGrid Sensors / Valve Controls21 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.Customer Information SystemCustomer Information System
    • ALR: Awareness – Location – RepairResource Planning and Scheduling Common Dispatching Functionality Mobile Communication Platform• Real‐time scheduling for optimal assignments and routingT k i t t l• Web browser based Dispatcher interfaceC t t d i KPI’ d l t t• Best practice workflows for field resources using a wide variety of mobile devices• Takes into account complex factors and rules such as skills, timing, location, cost goals, etc• Scheduling without boundaries• Context driven KPI’s and alerts to allow for exception based Dispatching• Map Viewer to show crews, their activities, their routes• Secure asynchronous communication• Store and forward for disconnected completions when 22 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.necessary
    • District Metering Area: Analytical ApproachActionable insight:R d i NRWgBilling• Reducing NRWLevels• From leak detectionto pipe rehabilitationMetering• Prioritization ofbudgets andinvestments• Improved asset lifeNetwork• Improved asset lifevia pressuremanagement• SafeguardingNData Inform Actcontinuous supplyand water quality23 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • Suggestions on Where to StartFirst Step: Implementation CostsFirst Step:• Establishing high levelcost / benefit matrix• Technical assessment of currentsituation and performanceImplementation CostsHigh Medium LowImpactHigh•Leakage on mains•Leakage on service connections•Unauthorizedconsumption•Unbilled metered consumption• Organized processes forcollecting, normalizing, geo-taggingand associating dataSecond Step:NRW Volume IMedium•Customer meter replacement•Customer metering inaccuracies and data handling errors•Pressure ManagementLow•Reservoir leakage•Unbilled unmetered consumption•Reservoir overflowsSecond Step:• Validating /adjusting data withreal measurements• Calibrating network model• Reviewing analytical approach and integrity of NRW-calculationsI i ALR d billip• Improving ALR and billing processesThird Step: Monitoring and institutionalizing continuous improvement process24 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • Key figures for business justificationWater – Loss Reduction• Reduced costs from water loss and increase revenues• Reducing energy and chemical consumptionReducing energy and chemical consumption• Increase billing accuracyIncreased Asset PerformanceI t l it d l t fNRWdecreasesInvestmentsare made inRevenueincrease and• Increase asset longevity and lower cost ofmaintenance• Improved Infrastructure leakage Index (ILI)• Reduced pipe breaks / faster ALR turnaround timeare made infurther NRWreductionprogramsExpenditureis increasedto includeoperationalincrease andoperationalCostdecreaseeduced p pe b ea s / aste tu a ou d t eBetter Service• Guaranteeing continuous quality water supplyReduction of waterborne diseases (biological mineral chemicalpimprovement• Reduction of waterborne diseases (biological, mineral, chemicalcontamination)• Improved water service quality (pressure, coloration, odor, salination, etc.)25 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • Moving from Reactive to Proactive• Quality Incidents• LeakageP ti• Preventive Asset planning• Asset IntegrityObjectivesPrevention• Reducing ALR-Time• DMA Monitoring• Network & PressureModeling• Optimizing DMA setupsAsset Integrity• Grid Performance• Financial ResultsAnalysis &D i iHistoricalReactiveDecisionProactiveDecisionPredictiveDecisions AssessmentDecisionMakingDecisionMakingAssessmentt = 0 Future TimePast TimeTimeframe CurrentConditions26 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.t 0 Future TimePast Time
    • Moving beyond 2013• Smart Water Networks exist, but still need to become standard and widely adopted• AquaEconomics – investments into intelligence are understood & largely ROI positive• Communication and communication links are becoming part of Smart City platforms• Data acquisition is benefitting from IoT electricity and ICT innovations• Data acquisition is benefitting from IoT, electricity and ICT innovations• Analytics has evolved from a passive data holder into a new business resourceBUTA Solid ICT Platform and high fidelity Data Analytics are needed to achieve sustainedA Solid ICT Platform and high fidelity Data Analytics are needed to achieve sustainedNRW reductions, active leakage prevention and real-time Water Balance insight.Sense Data Inform Act27 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • QuestionsWhen the wellis dry, we knowthe worth ofthe worth ofwater.Benjamin Franklin(1706 90)(1706-90)28 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.
    • 29 Copyright © 2012, Oracle and/or its affiliates. All rightsreserved. Oracle Proprietary and Confidential.