Science, the Next NOAA and Sea Grant

1,519 views
1,450 views

Published on

Paul Sandifer, Senior Scientist, NOAA Centers for Coastal Ocean Science. Sea Grant Week 2010

Published in: Education, Technology
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,519
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
1,000
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide
  • Thank you for inviting me to participate today. What I’d like to do briefly this morning is to put before you some of the things you already know about but in the context of drivers that will likely shape the future of both NOAA and Sea Grant. Obviously, I cannot hit on all the big topics, but I would like to mention a few.
  • These are: climate change and NOAA’s ongoing commitment to develop a scientifically strong and service-oriented Climate Service; our efforts to strengthen science as the foundation for virtually all that NOAA does; our Next Generation Strategic Plan; the new National Ocean Policy enunciated by President Obama a few months ago; the ongoing and long-term response to the Deep Water Horizon disaster; and of course where Sea Grant fits into all this.
  • JOINT PRESS CONFERENCE WITH SEC LOCKE AND DR. LUBCHENCO ON FEB 8
    NOAA’s intent to establish a new office called the NOAA Climate Service. This would create a single office for climate science and service bringing together the climate assets and capabilities that are currently dispersed in multiple units across the agency.”
    “We are announcing the intent to reorganize existing assets to make NOAA’s Climate Services more responsive to the needs of those who use our services. While additional funds will be needed to increase NOAA’s core climate capabilities going forward to meet growing demands, the proposed reorganization is independent of new resources.”
    “The proposed reorganization would retain the Office of Oceanic and Atmospheric Research recognizing the unique importance of a dedicated science and research enterprise with in NOAA.”
    COASTS AND CLIMATE RESILIENCE: Characterize the physical processes that drive local sea-level rise and inundation; promote understanding of sea-level rise impacts on coastal communities
    CLIMATE IMPACTS ON WATER QUANTITY: Increase the Nation’s ability to anticipate, prepare for, and adapt to drought and flooding
    SUSTAINABILITY OF MARINE ECOSYSTEMS: Integrate climate information into management of fisheries and large marine ecosystems (e.g. California Current)
    EXTREMES IN A CHANGING CLIMATE – Provide regional information to anticipate, prepare for, and adapt to extremes in a changing climate
    INFORMING CLIMATE POLICY OPTIONS – Assess emissions of short and long-lived GHG species and effectiveness of GHG management strategies
    NOAA Climate Objectives in the Next Generation Strategic Plan
    Improved scientific understanding of the changing climate system and its impacts
    Integrated assessments of current and future states of the climate system that identify potential impacts and inform science, services, and decisions
    Mitigation and adaptation efforts supported by sustained, reliable, and timely climate services
    A climate-literate public that understands its vulnerabilities to a changing climate and makes informed decisions
  • These are the pieces that would move into the NCS, based on our February 8th proposal. Since then, we have been working to develop an organizational wiring diagram, and functional descriptions for the new line office.
    We will focus on assessments of climate change and its impacts, climate change research and modeling, and climate observations and monitoring and will provide information and decision support tools to other federal agencies, states, regions, academia, and the public.
  • NOAA has made significant progress towards the establishment of an NCS since the Feb. 8th roll-out including:
    Internal and external engagement on strengthening science within NOAA, including within the NCS, OAR and the agency as whole
    Interagency collaborations on climate issues
    Hiring of 6 Regional Climate Services Directors
    4) Completing and releasing the Congressional requested National Academy of Public Administration Study on the NCS
    NOAA worked closely with NAPA throughout the process and have had the benefit of the their input and discussion throughout the process.
    5) Develop a draft reprogramming package for the NCS (that also includes NESDIS and OAR)
    6) Develop and release a draft NCS Vision and Strategic Framework Document for public comment (through Oct. 18)
  • Science underpins all that NOAA does. Building and maintaining strong NOAA science capacities, both internally and with external partners, is crucial for the success of the agency and its ability to carry out its mission on behalf of the Nation.
    Goal is to ensure that NOAA has a world-class internal scientific workforce (with supporting infrastructure) that is recognized widely for intellectual capacity, creativity, and innovation and that partners seamlessly and routinely with the external scientific community to support NOAA’s science, service, and stewardship mission.
  • This version (5.0) of NOAA’s Next Generation Strategic Plan uses the term “partners” 54 times, “partnerships” 36 times and refers specifically to Sea Grant 4 times.
    It includes major input from our external partners and constituents and from internal activities like our recent Strengthening Science Workshop that helped identify major research foci for the next 5-20 years. I’m not going to go into these now, since Craig McLean will be identifying them in his remarks, but do want to make the point that these overarching research goals came as much from the bottom up as from the top down.
    The NGSP focuses on NOAA’s inter-related missions of science, service and stewardship and is to understand and predict changes in climate, weather, oceans and coasts; share that knowledge and information with ohters; and conserve and manage marine resources. It is organized around four major areas: climate adaptation and mitigation; weather ready nation; healthy oceans; and resilient coastal communities. Note at the center is NOAA’s vision of the future: Healthy ecosystems, communities, and economies that are resilient in the face of change.
    I’m not going to say more about the NGSP today, as I believe Dr. Robinson will address it in some detail when he speaks to this group on Wednesday,
  • 1) Adopt ecosystem-based management as foundational principle
    2) Implement coastal and marine spatial planning
    3) Increase knowledge to inform decisions and improve understanding
    4) Coordinate and support governmental actions at all levels from local and tribal, to federal and international
    5) Strengthen resiliency and adaptation to climate change and ocean acidification
  • 6) Implement science-based regional ecosystem protection and restoration strategy
    7) Promote sustainable water quality and land use practices
    8) Address changing conditions in the Arctic
    9) Strengthen and integrate ocean, coastal and Great Lakes observations, mapping, and infrastructure
  • So, instead of thinking of Sea Grant in the context of having once been firmly attached to the shore, but now washed out to sea by the shifting sands of time, like the Morris Island Lighthouse near my home in Charleston;
  • Or as the house built upon the sands that washes away in a storm in the biblical story –
    I see Sea Grant more as a house built on a strong foundation
  • And along with NOAA as home agency,
  • A central and essential component and partner in many, many things we are doing. Now we have the Climate Service, our internal strengthening science effort, the clear directions in our new Next Generation Strategic Plan, the National Ocean Policy and all the follow-up efforts needed to deal with the ongoing effects of the BP-DWH Oil spill as providing very solid context for a continued and robust partnership between NOAA and Sea Grant for the next decade or more.
    But for Sea Grant to be a core element of NOAA’s response efforts to build the pre-eminent Climate Service that provides top-flight science and products to help American communities adapt to changing conditions; to strengthen our overall scientific capabilities, both internal and with partners; to implement our Next Generation Strategic Plan and its subordinate 5- and 20- year research plans; to carry out the directions of our first-ever National Ocean Policy, including ecosystem-based management and coastal and marine spatial planning; and for the long-term, multi-disciplinary efforts to recover and restore the Gulf of Mexico, then the national network of Sea Grant programs must become more of a regional and national player, focusing on activities that move the national ocean agenda forward.
  • Science, the Next NOAA and Sea Grant

    1. 1. Sea Grant Week, 2010, New Orleans, LA Paul A. Sandifer, Ph.D. Senior Science Advisor to the NOAA Administrator National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration | NOAA October 18, 2010
    2. 2. NOAA Science: Discover, Share and Use Knowledge 1. Climate Service 2. Strengthening Science 3. Next Gen Strategic Plan 4. National Ocean Policy 5. Deep Water Horizon 2Sea Grant Week 2010
    3. 3. 3 NOAA has core capabilities in: Integrated observations, data stewardship and climate monitoring Understanding and modeling Integrated service development and decision support NOAA will use these core assets to: 1. Provide foundational services that others can use to develop a variety of societal, economic, and environmental benefits 2. Focus NOAA’s own service development and delivery in 5 key areas: Sustainability of Marine Ecosystems Coasts and Climate Resilience Climate Impacts on Water Resources Changes in the Extremes of Weather and ClimateSea Grant Week 2010
    4. 4. 4 Sea Grant Week 2010
    5. 5. Congressionally requested National Academy of Public Administration Study complete and highly supportive Development of draft reprogramming package Development of draft Vision and Strategic Framework document Engagement on strengthening science Interagency collaborations: Ongoing participation as Co-Chair of interagency Climate Change Adaptation Task Force Signed MOU with DOC & DOI on regional climate collaboration CDC and NOAA held workshop on climate change and public health Currently exploring opportunities with Departments of Agric. and Trans., and NASA 5Sea Grant Week 2010
    6. 6. • www.noaa.gov/climate NAPA report, Vision and Strategic Framework, Document, Q&As, proposed reorganization chart, climate handouts, links to background resources • www.climate.gov NOAA’s Climate Portal • http://www.ppi.noaa.gov/ngsp.html NOAA’s Next Generation Strategic Plan 6Sea Grant Week 2010
    7. 7. Strengthening NOAA science is a continuous process that involves engaging NOAA’s scientists and science managers across all of NOAA and our external partners in answering four key questions: What are the grand challenges for NOAA science? What are the best practices for encouraging, promoting, and protecting healthy science at NOAA? What is the optimal organizational alignment of science elements in NOAA? How can NOAA implement a process for continual evaluation, enhancement, andSea Grant Week 2010 7
    8. 8. Determining R&D Priorities Identifying & Incorporating Operational Best Practices Establishing Organizational Principles & Practices Engaging & Involving the External Community Developing/& Implementing Mechanisms for Continuing Enhancement & Celebration Sea Grant Week 2010 8
    9. 9. Sea Grant Week 2010 9
    10. 10. 10Sea Grant Week 2010
    11. 11. DEEPWATER HORIZON: SCIENCE IN ACTION 11 SCIENCE COMMERCIAL FISHING RECREATION ENERGY & INDUSTRYNAVIGATION AQUACULTURE CONSERVATION
    12. 12. 1) Adopt ecosystem-based management as foundational principle 2) Implement coastal and marine spatial planning 3) Increase knowledge to informdecisions and improve understanding 4) Coordinate and support governmental actions at all levels fromlocal and tribal, to federal and international 5) Strengthen resiliency and adaptation to climate change and ocean acidification Sea Grant Week 2010 12
    13. 13. 6) Implement science-based regional ecosystem protection and restoration strategy 7) Promote sustainable waterquality and land use practices 8) Address changing conditions in the Arctic 9) Strengthen and integrate ocean, coastal and Great Lakes observations, mapping, and infrastructure Sea Grant Week 2010 13
    14. 14. DEEPWATER HORIZON: SCIENCE IN ACTION 14
    15. 15. 15Sea Grant Week 2010
    16. 16. 16Sea Grant Week 2010
    17. 17. Scientific needs to assess the full impacts of DWH on Gulf of Mexico ecosystems: Plankton assessments Microbial-driven oil biodegradation rates Lab exposure studies of oil and dispersants Protected species (turtles, birds, & mammals) Fisheries abundance and distribution Wetlands impacts & nursery areas Hypoxia & carbon loading Socio-economic impacts 18Sea Grant Week 2010
    18. 18. Sea Grant Week 2010 19
    19. 19. Sea Grant Week 2010 20
    20. 20. Sea Grant Week 2010 21
    21. 21. Sea Grant Week 2010 22 SCIENCE COMMERCIAL FISHING RECREATION ENERGY & INDUSTRYNAVIGATION AQUACULTURE CONSERVATION 1. Climate Service 2. Strengthening Science 3. Next Gen Strategic Plan 4. National Ocean Policy 5. Deep Water Horizon
    22. 22. Sea Grant Week 2010 23 SCIENCE COMMERCIAL FISHING RECREATION ENERGY & INDUSTRYNAVIGATION AQUACULTURE CONSERVATION 1. Climate Service 2. Strengthening Science 3. Next Gen Strategic Plan 4. National Ocean Policy 5. Deep Water Horizon
    23. 23. NOAA Science: Discover, Share and Use Knowledge

    ×