• Save

Loading…

Flash Player 9 (or above) is needed to view presentations.
We have detected that you do not have it on your computer. To install it, go here.

Like this presentation? Why not share!

Development of an Indonesian Sea Grant Partnership Program

on

  • 1,962 views

Sea Grant Week 2010 International Symposim

Sea Grant Week 2010 International Symposim

Statistics

Views

Total Views
1,962
Views on SlideShare
1,165
Embed Views
797

Actions

Likes
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0

2 Embeds 797

http://seagrantweek.wordpress.com 794
http://webcache.googleusercontent.com 3

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

CC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike LicenseCC Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike License

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Development of an Indonesian Sea Grant Partnership Program Development of an Indonesian Sea Grant Partnership Program Presentation Transcript

  • DEVELOPMENT OFINDONESIAN
    SEA PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM
    (SPP)
    &
    Example of SPP’s Challenges
    on the Existing National Program (e.g. COREMAP II)
    DIRECTORATE GENERAL OF MARINE, COASTSAND SMALL ISLANDS
    MINISTRY OF MARINE AFFAIRS AND FISHERIES
    2009
  • POTENSIALS
    Indonesia’s is the World’s largest archipelago
    95,150 km of coastline
    More than 17,480 islands
    Stretches over 3 equatorial time zones
    Marine waters cover 75% of the national area (~ 5.8 million km2), with third largest EEZ in the world (2.7 million km2 )
    Fourth largest population in the world (~230 million people)
    Coral Triangle Areas ~ Mega Marine Biodiversity
  • Basic Challenges:
    Large and rapid population growth
    Lack of knowledge for sustainable management of natural resources
    Lack of awareness on environmental (coastal) sustainability
    Poverty especially coastal community
  • NEW PARADIGM
    Decentralization
    Democratization; Participatory Approach
    Ecosystem Based Management?
    Sea Partnership (“MitraBahari“)
  • INTRODUCTIONTO “Sea Grant-Like”Indonesian Sea Partnership Program (SPP)
    SPP (“Mitra Bahari”) was adopted from Sea Grant Program Concepts and launched in Indonesia since October 2002
    SPP was developed in order to enhance marine, coastal and small islands resources for sustainable development
    by 2010 SPP has been grown and established in 33 provinces (participation of 86 Universities, 39 private institutions, 77 NGO’s)
  • Rules and Regulation Related on SPP
    Legally, SPP is declared in Law No. 27/2007 concerning on coastal zone and small islands management Article 41:
    “In an effort to increase the capacity of the stakeholders in management of coastal zone and small islands, a Sea Partnership shall be established as a forum for cooperation between the local government, universities, non-governmental organization, professional organizations, prominent figure of the community, and/or the industry”
    Ministerial Decree no 14/Men/2009 concerning on Sea Partnership
  • RATIONALE SEA PARTNERSHIP
    • SPP provides a mechanism for addressing implementation gaps at central and regional levels
    • SPP has accesses capacity between regional universities with local development needed
    • SPP matches national strategic priorities with regional and regional development issues
    • SPP is appropriate within the framework of democratic decentralization
  • VISION
    Partnership is vehicle to accelerate marine and fisheries development
    MISSION
    • To develop partnership among stakeholders for developing marine and fisheries sector
    • To strengthen sea partnership institution;
    • To support increasing capacity resources management incoastal and small islands areas based on science and technology;
    • To push acceleration of marine and fisheries development in coastal and small islands through outreach and/or extension activity, education and training, applied research, andpolicy recommendation.
  • OUTREACH
    National Strategic Priorities
    LOCAL GOV.
    DG-
    CSI
    EXTENTION
    Local Government Priorities
    CONSORTIUM REGIONAL
    Coastal Community Development
    UNIV.
    POLICY
    PRIVATE SECTOR
    Private Sector
    Development
    NGO’s
    APPLIED RESEARCH
    UNIVERSITY BASED REGIONAL IMPLEMENTATION STRUCTURE
  • Location of Sea Partnership Provinces (2003-2010)
  • Several Activities has been Achieved within Sea Partnership Consortia in 2009
  • CORAL REEF TRANSPLANTATION TRAINING IN GOSONG SENGGORO
    • When : June 2009
    • Where : GosongSenggoro, Kotawaringin Barat , Central Kalimantan
    • Who : Coastal Communities in GosongSenggoro
  • Entrepreneurship Training for Fisherman Women’s Group in Pasia Nan Tigo Padang
    Sea Partnership Consortia West Sumatera, 2009
  • Training Application of GPS and Fish finder for fisherman in Sea Partnership Consortia South Kalimantan
    • When : April 2010
    • Where : Fishing Port MuaraKintap South Kalimantan
    • Who : 3 groups fisherman from Muarakintap and
    Aluh –Aluh
    • What : Application of GPS and Fish finder
  • National Secretariat Achievement in 2009
  • HONAM SEA GRANT VISIT, 2009
  • ACTION PLANS FOR YEAR 2010 IN NATIONAL SECRETARIAT OF SPP
    Strengthening national Secretariat
    Produce SPP journals, Booklet, film, success story of RC-SPP
    Training of Trainer/In House Training
    Coordination Meeting
    National Workshop on Sea Partnership Program
    Participation on SPP Week in USA
  • Sea Partnership Coordination Meeting September, 2010
  • Increasing quality and active participation of coastal community
    Strengthening institution, networking, and personnel of SPP
    Synchronizing program & development of partnership scope of SPP
    Increasing support facility, monitoring and evaluation system for strategic planning of SPP
    ncreasing program & improvement of budgeting system of SPP.
    Strategies for Development of SPP
  • POTENTIAL INTERNATIONAL COLLABORATIVE ACTIVITIES AND OPPORTUNITY FOR DEVELOPING SEA PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM
    PARTICIPATE IN US SEA GRANT WEEK AND KOREAN SEA GRANT WEEK
    TRAINING of TRAINERS/IN HOUSE TRAINING
    PROPOSED INTERNATIONAL ADVISER (INSTITUTIONAL DEVELOPMENT SPECIALIST ) FOR REVITALIZATION OF SPP INSTITUSIONAL
    STRENGTHENING HUMAN RESOURCE CAPACITY TROUGH EDUCATION ( INTERNSHIP, SISTER UNIVERSITY , SCIENTIST EXCHANGE PROGRAMS, ETC)
    CONTINUING EXTENSION AND COMMUNICATION PROGRAM THROUGH WORSKHOP AND TRAINING
  • SPP PUBLICATIONS
  • Cross Visit
    Indonesian SPP – KOREA SEA GRANT
    • Korea Sea Grant (Honam Sea Grant) delegates visited SPP in 10-13 August 2009 : Taekkun Nam (Director of Honam Sea Grant Program), Daegwun Yoon (Mokpo University), Denny Kim (Chief of Honam Sea Grant Program), Sophie Kim (Researcher of Honam Sea Grant Program).
    • November 2009, SPP participated in Korea Sea Grant Week
    • The Expo 2012 Yeosu Korea Organizing Committee visited MMAF. Director Marine Policy Division, Ministry of Land, Transport and Maritime Affairs invite SPP to participate in Korea Sea Grant meeting that will be conduct at the expo.
  • CHALLENGES AND OPPORTUNITIES
    • Indonesian Sea Partnership is rapidly growing and required stronger cooperation and better strategies
    • More active participation of Universities
    • Stakeholders contribution (budget and activities) is needed
    • Expand networking at the national, regional and international levels
    • Increasing human resource capacity in each regional center
    • Development of activity implementation through collaboration of cross consortia
    • Increasing contribution of SPP to accelerate marine and fisheries development
    • Opportunity given by Law No. 27/2007 such as Ministry Decree on SPP, strategic planning, and evaluation and monitoring
    • Opportunity to participate in global cooperation/commitment for managing some international issues (i.e. CTI, etc)
  • Example of SPP’s Challenges
    on the Existing National Program
    Coral Reef Rehabilitation and Management Program in Indonesia (COREMAP II)
  • Threats to Indonesian reefs
    >23,000 km2 of original mangrove lost by 1980.
    Percentage of degraded reefs increased from 10 % to 50 % over last 50 years.
    Western Indonesia: < 30 % of reefs have a coral cover > 50 %
    Eastern Indonesia better but still < 45 %
    Only 15 % of reefs are not threatened
    50 % of reefs are highly threatened.
    Remote reefs are not safe from exploitation and damage.
    Threats stem from both natural phenomena and anthropogenic impacts.
    The degree of threat varies with region, only through active collaborative research
    we will determine the type and degree of threat (s) impacting the Indonesian reefs
    ( source Reefs at Risk)
  • Anthropogenic factors decreasing diversity: DESTRUCTIVE TECHNIQUES
    Modified from Smith 2003
    Effects of distance on coral recovery following a blast event
    30000
    25000
    Bleached
    Overgrown
    2
    20000
    Bleaching area
    recovered
    Surface area (mm)
    15000
    10000
    5000
    0
    time 0
    1 year later
    time 0
    1 year later
    Porites 1 (6m away)
    Porites 2 (3 m away)
    BLAST FISHING: can destroy nearby corals and severely impact distant corals.
    CYANIDE FISHING:physical damage.
    Both extremely costly (Hopley and Suharsono 2000)
    Between 2000 – 2020 these practises will cost Indonesia:
    BLAST: U$ 570 million
    CYANIDE: U$ 46 million
    CORAL MINING: is completely unsustainable
    Blast and cyanide fishing still a huge
    problem – need to enforce policy AND
    examine mid to long term impacts.
    ALTERNATIVE INCOME STREAMS?
  • Coral Bleaching
    Natural or Anthropogenic induced?
    “Bleaching” is a very
    generic non-specific
    term.
    Many factors induce
    bleaching / coral mortality.
    One of the biggest cause of concern is thermal induced bleaching.
    From Smith et al 2005 Global Change Biology
  • COREMAP PHASES
    • Phase 1: Initiation (1998-2003)
    • Viable framework for a national coral reef system in Indonesia established
    • Assistance from: GOI, ADB, WB/GEF, AusAID
    • Phase 2: Acceleration (2004 - 2012)
    • Viable reef management systems established in 15 districts
    • Assistance from: GOI, ADB, WB/GEF
    • Phase3???: Institutionalization (2012–2017)
    • Viable reef management systems established in priority districts operational, fully decentralized to regional governments and institutionalized
  • Unique Design Features
    Decentralized Management
    Multi Stakeholder Inclusion
    Quantifiable Fisheries Benefits
    Wide Geographic Coverage
    Sound Financial Management
    Awareness for Behavior Change
    Project Support Communications
  • COREMAP II Goals:
    • Insure biodiversity conservation and sustainable management of coral reefs and related ecosystems;
    • Strengthen the capacity of communities and local institutions to manage coral reefs and related ecosystems; and
    • Lower the incidence of poverty in the Program’s coastal communities
  • The COREMAP (Phase 2) implemented through 3 components:
    (A) Institutional Strengthening - to enhance government institutional responsiveness to meet the needs of coastal communities, in support of collaborative management o f marine reserves and other marine protected Areas
    (B) Community Based & Collaborative Management - to empower all coastal communities and institutions throughout program districts to sustainably co-manage coral reefs and associated ecosystems to increase incomes which will in turn enhance community welfare
    (C) Public Awareness, Education and SPP to promote societal awareness o f the benefits of coral reef ecosystem conservation and sustainable use that leads to behavioral change.
  • COREMAP II
    ADB
    COREMAP II: LOCATIONS
    COREMAP II
    WB
  • CORE of COREMAP
    Simple principles
  • We are too small……..!!!
  • Sustainable Reef Fisheries:Challenging for COREMAP Program!
    Total Allowable Catch?
    Environmentally Friendly Fishing Gears?
    Size Limitation/ Regulation?
    Enforcement
    Empowerment
    Ecosystem Based Management
  • Small ScaleLocally ManagedMarine Protected Area (DPL)
  • Spill-Over: Penangkapan di Luar DPL
  • ANNEX A. MCS SYSTEM WORKING MECHANISM
    DISTRICT ZONE
    (4 NM)
    PROVINCIAL ZONE
    (12 NM )
    OTHER FISHERMAN
    REEFWATCHER
    REPEATER ANTENA
    COMMUNICATION PATHWAY
    HIGHEST
    TOPOGRAPHY
    ISLAND
    REEF WATCHER
    VIOLATOR
    MCS BOAT
    ISLAND
    REEF WATCHER
    HOLDING CAGE
    POLICE OFFICE
    FISH DISEMBARCATION STATION
    COREMAP
    STATION
    SUBDISTRICT
    OFFICE
    KSDA OFFICE
  • 1. Institutional Accomplishments
    • Operate in 16 Districts with Reef Area (3,300 sq km)
    • Reach 407 Villages
    • Baselines (Ecological; Social) Established
    • Training Programs Conducted at all Levels
    • 8 Provincial & District Legislation
    • 15 District Coral Reef Strategies
    • 14 District Marine Protected Areas (KKLDs)
  • 2. Community Based Accomplishments
    • 700 Field Extension Workers
    • 407 LPSTK and Village Information Centers
    • More than 20.000 members of Pokmas
    • 400 Village Coral Reef Mgmt Plans (RPTKs)
    • 400 Village Protected Areas (DPLs)
    • Community Monitoring, Control, Surveillance
    • 390 Micro Credit Operations
  • 3. Public Awareness/Education/Sea Partnership Accomplishments
    • Public Awareness Campaigns – All Media
    • Competitions & Contests at all levels
    • Teacher Training
    • Elementary School Books and Program
    • Junior and Senior High School Books
    • Seconded Staff Placements
    • University Scholarships
    • University Field Internships
    • High School Scholarships
    • University Research Projects
  • SEA PARTNERSHIP PROGRAM-COREMAP II
    COREMAP-II
    • Institutional Strengthening): Program Coordination M & E and Training
    • Community Based and Collaborative Management : COMUNNITY EMPOWERMENT, COMUNNITY DEVELOPMENT, COMUNNITY BASE RESOURCE MANAGEMENT, MARINE CONSERVATION AREA MANAGEMENT
    • PUBLIC AWARNESS,
    EDUCATION AND SEA PARTNERSHIP
    PROGRAM
    SPP-COREMAP
    NATIONAL SPP
    • OUTREACH
    • EXTENSION AND EDUCATION
    • APPLIED RESEARCH
    • POLICY RECOMMENDATION
    Advisory Services
    Responsive Research
    Scholarship
    Seconded Staff
    Field Work Training or
    Internship
    6. Establish National Sea Partnership Office
  • COREMAP-SPP and
    US Sea Grant (2009)
    1
    2
    3
  • CORAL TRIANGLE INITIATIVE ( CTI )ON CORAL REEFS,FISHERIES AND FOOD SECURITIES
    Next Challenges
    ~ SPP Development
    ~ COERMAP III ?
    ~ CTI
    Challenge and Opportunity of Science and Management
    in Improving People’s Prosperity
  • TERIMA KASIH
    THANK YOU
    GAMSAHABNIDA