Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
  • Like
Predicting habitat quality...
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×

Now you can save presentations on your phone or tablet

Available for both IPhone and Android

Text the download link to your phone

Standard text messaging rates apply

Predicting habitat quality...

  • 377 views
Published

Dr. Lorenzo Ciannelli's 2012-2014 Oregon Sea Grant-supported research project, "Predicting Habitat Quality of Juvenile English Sole and Dungeness Crab in Coastal and Estuarine Nursery Grounds"

Dr. Lorenzo Ciannelli's 2012-2014 Oregon Sea Grant-supported research project, "Predicting Habitat Quality of Juvenile English Sole and Dungeness Crab in Coastal and Estuarine Nursery Grounds"

Published in Technology
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Be the first to comment
    Be the first to like this
No Downloads

Views

Total Views
377
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
0

Actions

Shares
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0

Embeds 0

No embeds

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
    No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. PREDICTING HABITAT QUALITY OF JUVENILE ENGLISH SOLE AND DUNGENESS CRAB IN COASTAL AND ESTUARINE NURSERY GROUNDS Lorenzo Ciannelli (OSU CEOAS), Cliff Ryer (NOAA, HMSC) Morgan Bancroft (OSU CEOAS)• Experimentally determine effect of water temperature and dissolved oxygen on English sole and Dungeness crab body growth• Based on experimental rates, predict the potential for growth in coastal and estuarine habitat types, from field measurements and model predictions of water temperature and dissolved oxygen
  • 2. Soft sediment habitats are highly dynamic, biologically diverse, subject to multiple uses and poorly known Highly dynamic Biologically rich Multiple usesCourtesy of Jack Barth
  • 3. Nearshore and estuarine habitats are intertwinedEstuarine AND coastal nursery areas
  • 4. Objectives and approaches• Experimentally determine effect of water temperature and dissolved oxygen on English sole and Dungeness crab body growth• Based on experimental rates, predict the potential for growth in coastal and estuarine habitat types, from field measurements and model predictions of water temperature and dissolved oxygen 20-40 mm Experimental design - 4 temperature 5-12oC - 3 DO (0.5-6.0 mll-1) - 2 replicates - 30 days trial Diagram: courtesy of Morgan Bancroft 30-55 mm -Two-year study
  • 5. Why an experimental approach?1. DO and temperature are often correlated: hard to disentangle2. Need to define rates in order to make predictions Estuary and coast DO vs Temp
  • 6. Why are we excited about this and why it matters?1. Quantify the additive and interactive effects of water temperature and dissolved oxygen on English sole and Dungeness crab body growth - Disentangle confounding effects of water temperature and DO2. Predictions of ‘habitat quality’ over contrasting years - Disentangle role of estuarine vs coastal nurseries3. Study aligns with ongoing efforts for Coastal Marine Spatial Planning by providing information on habitat characteristics and impact of environmental stressors - MPAs, Wave energy development, disposal sites of dredge sediment4. Study focuses on commercially important species for OR coastal fisheries - Oregon Dungeness crab commission: ‘Projects that may provide a better understanding of the impacts linked to the recurring hypoxic events along the coast would be valuable to the crab industry’ ‘work related to ‘habitat quality’ is very timely in the face of proposed wave energy development in areas considered to be some of the most productive for Dungeness crab’
  • 7. Opportunity for coordination, outreach, and stakeholders involvement1. Integrate results from Dr. Lerczak model to generate scenarios of habitat characteristics2. Plan research activities and share results with Oregon Dungeness crab commission (Nick Furman)3. Develop visual and text displays at the visitor center of the HMSC on the relevance of estuarine and coastal nursery areas (Bill Hanshumaker)