Ways and means 3 16-11 lw

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Governor Kitzhaber has proposed moving Oregon to an education system that cares more about outcomes that seat time and that abandons Oregon’s siloed approach to setting budgets for PreK, K-12, higher education and community colleges. It’s a major transformation, but it is necessary for the health of our communities and economy.

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  • BS: I think this should add: presentation by Educational Investment Team Budget Work Group or something like that
  • BS: This should be presented in the same way as slide 31. the100 is confusing versus 40-40-20
  • BS: Is it lack of structure or lack of vision and focus on outcomes?
  • 7.1.26 Underlay slides that expand these concepts
  • 7.1.26 Underlay slides that expand these concepts
  • 7.1.26 Underlay slides that expand these concepts
  • 7.1.26 Underlay slides that expand these concepts BS: I can ’t manipulate the slide but what I think goes here is “to get the outcomes Create more value for the dollars available (see format of previous slide)
  • 7.1.26 Underlay slides that expand these concepts BS: same as previous slide heading
  • Same format as slide 22
  • Tuition compared to oregon opportunity grant
  • 2.2.9
  • Ways and means 3 16-11 lw

    1. 1. Investing in Learning. Rethinking the Way We Budget for Education. Ways and Means Sub-Committee on Education Presentation by Education Investment Team Budget Work Group
    2. 2. Outline <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul><ul><li>Why Change? Why Now? </li></ul><ul><li>Proposed Approach </li></ul><ul><li>Roles and Responsibilities </li></ul><ul><li>Discussion of next steps </li></ul>
    3. 3. <ul><li>Introduction </li></ul>
    4. 4. <ul><li>Design a unified, performance based 0-20 budget model for consideration by the 2012 legislative session. </li></ul>Governor ’s Charge to Education Investment Team Transform Oregon's approach to education from silos into an integrated and meaningful pathway to success for Oregonians of all ages.
    5. 5. <ul><li>40/40/20 Vision </li></ul><ul><li>40 percent of Oregon adults should have a bachelor ’s degree or higher. </li></ul><ul><li>40 percent should have at least an associate’s degree or other technical credential. </li></ul><ul><li>20 percent should have a high school diploma that represents a high level of academic and work readiness skills . </li></ul>Governor ’s Charge to Education Investment Team
    6. 6. We seek your help <ul><li>We would like feedback. </li></ul><ul><li>In turn, we hope that we can provide information and insights that will help you make decisions this session. </li></ul>
    7. 7. <ul><ul><li>The case for the new budget framework </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Why change, why now? </li></ul></ul>
    8. 8. The Assignment <ul><li>How to best allocate resources to achieve outcomes for learners, communities and the general public? </li></ul>$7.4 billion General/Lottery Fund
    9. 9. Budgeting methods vary widely by area… Type of Budgeting PK-12 CCWD OUS OHSU OSAC TSPC State Agency Line Item Budget ODE CCWD Chancellor’s Office OHSU OSAC TSPC State Agency Line Item Budget Early Childhood, Special Ed Grants Universities SWPs State School Fund K-12 Schools & ESDs College Support Fund Community Colleges Grant in Aid OHSU Budget Request Approved by State Board of Ed State Board of Ed State Board of Higher Ed OHSU Board OSAC TSPC
    10. 10. <ul><li>In making a budget request, state rules allow some agencies to take enrollment into account. Others cannot. </li></ul><ul><li>Rules also differ with respect to how agencies factor in expected changes in staff compensation. </li></ul>… and rules direct agencies to build education budgets differently. Program Budget Development Considers Expected Enrollment Growth? Budget Development Incorporates Education-Sector Inflation Index? Oregon Pre-K No No ECSE/EI Yes No K-12 Yes Yes Community Colleges No No OUS No No OHSU No No
    11. 11. <ul><li>Incomplete accounting of revenues available to education institutions. </li></ul><ul><li>Level of program aggregation that obscures sizable programs with distinct goals. </li></ul><ul><li>Lack of human scale or reference to number of students served or staff employed. </li></ul><ul><li>Based on history and formulas, not on outcomes. </li></ul>The traditional way of presenting the budget omits important information and trends. Revenue Source 2009-11 LAB All Education General Fund $6,819,998,207 Lottery Funds $536,375,882 Other Funds $4,729,433,138 Federal Funds $1,755,698,966 Total $13,841,506,193
    12. 12. Average Annual Growth in General Fund, 2000-11 Absent structure or fiscal goals, education funding eroded in the last decade
    13. 13. Perverse incentives pervade existing funding formula
    14. 14. <ul><li>Accelerated learning = </li></ul><ul><li>early graduation = </li></ul><ul><li>less money </li></ul>
    15. 15. <ul><li>Shorter school year = </li></ul><ul><li>less student contact = </li></ul><ul><li>no change in money </li></ul>
    16. 16. <ul><li>More students identified with special needs </li></ul><ul><li>= </li></ul><ul><li>more money </li></ul>
    17. 17. <ul><li>Longer participation in ESL </li></ul><ul><li>= </li></ul><ul><li>more money </li></ul>
    18. 18. <ul><li>More efficient transportation operations = </li></ul><ul><li>less money </li></ul>
    19. 19. <ul><li>Chronic absenteeism = </li></ul><ul><li>smaller class sizes = </li></ul><ul><li>no change in money </li></ul>
    20. 20. “ If there is one lesson of the past decades of reform efforts, it is that funds sent to districts without regard to performance do not have, on average, a powerful impact on student learning.” - Eric Hanushek (2007)
    21. 21. <ul><li>Agree on the outcomes. </li></ul><ul><li>Understand who the learners are and where the money is going, and what are we getting for it. </li></ul><ul><li>Determine what evidence says would improve outcomes with the money we have. </li></ul>Proposed Approach - So what is a better framework?
    22. 22. <ul><li>Agree on the outcomes </li></ul>
    23. 23. <ul><li>Current Reform Strategies to Advance Student Success Along the Continuum: </li></ul><ul><li>Rigorous Curriculum </li></ul><ul><li>Data System providing regular and timely feedback </li></ul><ul><li>Unified Budget allocated to achieve outcomes </li></ul>40% post-secondary 40% college graduates Economic Vitality Per Capita Income Growth Active Civic Life 20% at least high school diploma Goals % children ready-to-learn % meeting 3 rd grade benchmarks % meeting 5 th grade benchmarks % meeting 8 th grade benchmarks % 18 year-olds college & work ready % adults with Associates % adults with completed Bachelor ’s % adults with advanced degree Outcomes Children have access to quality Pre-K experience Students engage in a rigorous curriculum Every student “on track” to graduation Students complete secondary with meaningful skills Oregonians Pursue Ongoing Post-Secondary Education Output OR per capita income % voter turnout % who volunteer Benchmarks
    24. 24. To get to the outcomes: Build A Continuum Framework <ul><li>Create a unified education delivery system with curriculum alignment so that exit standards from one sector equal entrance standards to the next. </li></ul><ul><li>Implement a unified data system so that student and institutional data track across the continuum. </li></ul><ul><li>Produce a unified, transparent budget for the continuum. </li></ul>
    25. 25. <ul><li>In a unified education system: </li></ul><ul><li>Rigorous, relevant curriculum links to standards across the PreK-20 continuum. </li></ul><ul><li>Students ’ assessment scores will inform their instructional plans. </li></ul><ul><li>Students will be able to move at a pace dictated by their rate of achievement. </li></ul><ul><li>Multiple delivery mechanisms and choices available to students, who may be enrolled in more than one institution at a time depending on their needs. </li></ul>
    26. 26. <ul><li>Goal for unified education system: </li></ul><ul><li>Cut at least one year on average for time to degree. </li></ul><ul><li>Increase substantially the minimum standards in reading, writing, mathematics for H.S., AA and BA degrees. </li></ul><ul><li>Increase numbers attaining degrees to meet 40-40-20. </li></ul>To get to the outcomes: Transform the Delivery System
    27. 27. <ul><ul><li>Accelerating learning. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Reducing remediation. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Applying new learning tools such as online learning. </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Other efficiencies. </li></ul></ul>To get to the outcomes: Create more value for the dollars available
    28. 28. <ul><li>In a unified education data system: </li></ul><ul><li>Student transcripts, scores and plans will track across the continuum. </li></ul><ul><li>Assessment tools will measure students ’ proficiencies at every stage. </li></ul><ul><li>Credits and advancement depend on successful achievement to standards. </li></ul><ul><li>Institutional financial and performance data will be available to system managers and the public. </li></ul>To get to the outcomes: Transform the Data System
    29. 29. Questions that can be Answered by a Transparent, Outcome-Based Budget <ul><li>What are we trying to accomplish for each level of education and how are we performing? </li></ul><ul><li>How much variation in performance is there across the state? How does Oregon compare with national and international benchmarks? </li></ul><ul><li>If we are not producing the expected results, do we need changes in policy, practices, or investment levels? Are there best practices that can be adopted? </li></ul>
    30. 30. A New Budget Will Change Policy Discussions FROM Based on education sectors Argument about a single number Budgeting on the margins Debate: Level of funding Funding agencies TO Based on groups of students Discussion about investments and outcomes Budget the use of all education resources Debate: How to get better results Investing in educational outcomes for students
    31. 31. 40/40/20 Vision <ul><li>40 percent of Oregon adults should have a bachelor ’s degree or highe r, another 40 percent should have at least an associate’s degree or other technical credentia l, and the remaining 20 percent should have a high school diploma that represents a high level of academic and work readiness skills . </li></ul><ul><li>Governor Kitzhaber Charge </li></ul>
    32. 32. <ul><li>Understand who the learners are and where the money is going, and what are we getting for it. </li></ul>
    33. 33. Percentage of 55- to 64-Year-Olds with an Associate Degree or Higher, 2007
    34. 34. Percentage of 25- to 34-Year-Olds with an Associate Degree or Higher, 2007
    35. 35. $3.7 billion/yr General/Lottery Fund Annual Education Expenditures, 2011 $7.8 billion/yr GF/LF, property taxes, federal, and tuitions
    36. 36. State, Local, Federal, Tuition and Fees Spending per student , 2008-09
    37. 37. State, Local, Federal, Tuition and Fees Spending per student , 2008-09
    38. 38. State, Local, Federal, Tuition and Fees Spending per student , 2008-09
    39. 39. State, Local, Federal, Tuition and Fees Spending per student , 2008-09 $6.7 $8.7
    40. 40. Number of Students, 2008-09
    41. 41. Total Spending, 2008-09 State & Local Federal Tuition and Fees, Other
    42. 42. What does evidence say would improve outcomes with the money we have?
    43. 43. Oregon ’s Goals For Education Attainment <ul><li>Dramatic Increases in: </li></ul><ul><li>High school graduation rates </li></ul><ul><li>Students meeting rigorous academic standards </li></ul><ul><li>Oregonians enrolling, persisting, and graduating in the postsecondary system </li></ul><ul><li>Oregonians with strong apprenticeships or technical training </li></ul><ul><li>Opportunities for lifelong learning </li></ul>
    44. 44. Questions to Ask? <ul><li>Who are the learners? </li></ul><ul><li>What are the outcomes we want to achieve? </li></ul><ul><li>How much is available to invest in the education continuum? How can we best allocate those resources to achieve our desired outcomes? </li></ul><ul><li>How can we align incentives and use evidence-based practices to get the results we want? </li></ul><ul><li>What parts of the system are ripe for redesign? </li></ul><ul><li>What investments are necessary to make the changes that will allow us to achieve our outcomes? </li></ul>
    45. 45. <ul><li>Roles and responsibilities </li></ul>
    46. 46. Role of the Education Investment Board <ul><li>Recasts the state ’s role in PreK-20 as a procurer of educational outcomes. </li></ul><ul><li>Unbundle distinct services and organize the budget around students rather than systems or institutions. </li></ul><ul><li>Establishes performance contracts with schools that provide services to students. Contracts include expectations for learning outcomes. </li></ul><ul><li>Establishes priorities and funding levels among services. </li></ul><ul><li>Manages reserve funds to ensure minimum funding level per-student is carried for ALL Oregon students throughout economic cycles. </li></ul>
    47. 47. <ul><li>State government procures education outcomes on behalf of learners and the general public. </li></ul><ul><li>School districts (including charter schools), community college districts, and public universities provide the services. </li></ul>Proposed Division of Responsibility
    48. 48. <ul><li>State government steers , through its investments and oversight. </li></ul><ul><li>Schools row , providing quality services to learners. </li></ul>Proposed Division of Responsibility
    49. 49. Key roles of schools <ul><li>To provide quality education to students. </li></ul><ul><li>To continuously improve practices to get ever greater value of the dollars invested. </li></ul>
    50. 50. Role of state in accountability <ul><li>Review progress, create incentives for continuous improve. </li></ul><ul><li>Identify and bust barriers getting in the way of student outcomes. </li></ul>
    51. 51. <ul><li>What are the next steps? </li></ul>
    52. 52. <ul><li>To be continued on Monday ’s agenda… </li></ul><ul><li>What additional information do you need to make wise budget decisions this session? </li></ul><ul><li>Where are the highest leveraged opportunities for redesign now and in the future? </li></ul><ul><li>What else can we do to be helpful? </li></ul>

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