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Social media-facebook-twitter-mishaps
Social media-facebook-twitter-mishaps
Social media-facebook-twitter-mishaps
Social media-facebook-twitter-mishaps
Social media-facebook-twitter-mishaps
Social media-facebook-twitter-mishaps
Social media-facebook-twitter-mishaps
Social media-facebook-twitter-mishaps
Social media-facebook-twitter-mishaps
Social media-facebook-twitter-mishaps
Social media-facebook-twitter-mishaps
Social media-facebook-twitter-mishaps
Social media-facebook-twitter-mishaps
Social media-facebook-twitter-mishaps
Social media-facebook-twitter-mishaps
Social media-facebook-twitter-mishaps
Social media-facebook-twitter-mishaps
Social media-facebook-twitter-mishaps
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Social media-facebook-twitter-mishaps

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Learn what the common risks businesses face on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIN, and social media and how to plan for common threats. Lastly, see positive and negative examples of Facebook and Twitter …

Learn what the common risks businesses face on Facebook, Twitter, LinkedIN, and social media and how to plan for common threats. Lastly, see positive and negative examples of Facebook and Twitter fails!

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  • Necessary evil is a risk if you choose to ignore social media & a reward if you approach social media properly, define the strategy, and proceed accordingly.Passive brands will be left behind. Understanding how social media can help businesses will help you with your business. Customer service is changing. A one-to-one relationship with customers is becoming more of a reality.New media is the new way of media and marketing.
  • Risks: It’s not always possible for small business to hire a dedicated social media employee. Assigning the roles to an employee with another duty is common. Be sure to outline rules and monitor regularly. All company messages, responses, and mentions should be answered with 24-48 hours. The quicker the better!Who are you trying to connect with?
  • Risks: Outsourcing, employees, unanswered complaints, missed opportunities.
  • Risks: Outsourcing, employees, unanswered complaints, missed opportunities.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Social Media Mishaps<br />#(@*&amp;$@#<br />
    • 2. Brian Solis, <br />“As they say, failing to plan is planning to fail. The success of all things social media is up to you to define, quite literally.”<br />
    • 3. Necessaryevil.Reward or Risk<br />Passive brands are dissolving brands. Reward<br />No longer your Parent’s Customer Service model. Reward<br />Define:New Media - Online and digital ways of receiving information. Opportunities abound!<br />PR on the Web – Risk vs. Reward<br />
    • 4. Ignoring Social Media<br />Training employees. <br />Develop policies for employees <br />Dealing with complaints. <br />Contingency plans for common failures.<br />What Not to Do!<br />Overview<br />
    • 5. #(@*&amp;$@#<br />Gartner.com estimated more than 50% of companies on social media will fail to manage it effectively and could potentially drive customers away. <br />
    • 6. The risks of moving a brand to social. <br />Choosing the wrong person to represent your business. <br />Being too quiet. <br />Not knowing what to do. After all, not succeeding on social is the most common mistake of all. <br />Welcome and Introduction<br />
    • 7. Training and Monitoring<br />Training employees to reach clear targets. <br />Train employees to not be overly self-promotional. <br />Train employees to maintain a consistent voice when talking through the brand or business name. <br />Employees should not tweet or post information on any social networking site on behalf of the employer, unless approved by appropriate management.<br />Monitor status updates, tweets, and create a solid contingency plan in case disaster occurs. <br />Train employees what to do if negative influence appears. <br />
    • 8. Complaining, venting, and not laughing on social channels. Employee’s can &amp; often do use social profiles to vent. Short fuses do not belong on Twitter, Facebook, and Public Spotlights. <br />Being Wimpy. Bullies are everywhere – have tough skin and remain professional and friendly. Remember: Communities Are Not Going to Turn Their Back on You. Another Reason interactions, advocates, and friends are so important. <br />Avoid Common Foul-ups. Obnoxious tones, sarcasm, lying, overconfidence, automating, pontificating wildly. <br />Early Warning Signs –the Basics<br />
    • 9. When Barry Judge, the CMO of Best Buy started blogging, he sent a premium loyalty offering out to 6.8 million customers rather than the 1,000 intended. Barry apologized immediately on the blog for violating customer trust and also asked for feedback on additional steps Best Buy could take to rebuild trust. The result: A Positive Reaction to a Negative Action.<br />
    • 10. Facebook Examples<br />
    • 11. In preparation for the release of its Accord Crosstour, Honda launched a Facebookpage for feedback.<br />It backfired<br />Negative reviews started pouring in. Except for one from Eddie Okubu, he appeared to love the Crosstour. Fans quickly discovered Eddie was the manager of product planning at Honda. Honda removed his post for the reason “he did not disclose his affiliation with the company” <br />
    • 12. Nestle vs. Facebook Users: Round Goes to Facebook Users.<br />
    • 13. Chrysler claimed their account was hacked. Later, they isolated the problem to an employee at their social media agency. <br />
    • 14. And the winner is..<br />
    • 15. Oops, Wrong Account..<br />
    • 16. Ignoring Social Media<br />Training employees. <br />Develop policies for employees <br />Contingency plans for common failures.<br />What Not to Do!<br />Summary<br />
    • 17. Free. Monitors Blogs, Forums &amp; Twitter. <br />Free. Monitors Blogs, Forums &amp; Twitter. <br />$. Monitors Blogs, Forums &amp; Twitter. Charts &amp; Sentiment<br />$$. Monitors all social channels. Workflow <br />$$$. Monitor all social channels, archived data, workflow.<br />
    • 18. Social Media Policy<br />Employees may not use company equipment or systems to “twitter” or log onto social networking sites.<br />Twittering on personal cell phones, Personal Data Assistants (PDAs), etc. may not interfere with working time.<br />Employees should not tweet or post information on any social networking site on behalf of the employer, unless approved by appropriate management.<br />Employees may not use company logos or trademarks in tweets or twitpics (a service that enables users to post pictures to Twitter) or any other social networking site without company authorization.<br />Employees may not promote the company’s products or services on any social networking site or online message board without prior management authorization and without disclosing their employment relationship.<br />Employees may not post information on any social networking site that disparages the company’s products or services, contains false statements or breaches the employer’s confidentiality policies.<br />Employees who have any information on their social networking site about the company should provide a disclaimer on their profile page that the opinions are their own, and not those of the company. – SocialMediaRisks.com<br />
    • 19. Twitter.com/BrentRangen<br />218-833-2SEO<br />OptimizeGuyz.com<br />

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