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What actually matters when designing for mobile
 

What actually matters when designing for mobile

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Kris Nygren's presentation at the Marketing Association's Brainy Breakfast 27.08.12

Kris Nygren's presentation at the Marketing Association's Brainy Breakfast 27.08.12

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  • Good morning!My name is Kris Nygren. I’m CEO for a company called Optimal Usability. We are a user experience design company and have completed more than 1,000 design projects for 200 mostly NZ clients. More an more often we work in the mobile space and I’d like to talk to you for a moment about what actuallymatters when you are designing your mobile strategy and customer experience…To kick us off, lets establish some fundamental design principles for mobile[CLICK]
  • Mobile is more like snacking on the run than eating a proper meal. Like grazing from the fridge it can mean a snack of jelly and stiltoncheese….followed by a quick swig out of the orange juice while no one is looking…and orange juice isn't a euphemism for porn if you're wondering.[CLICK]
  • So bearing these principles in mind…I’m going to look at mobile experience design from four different perspectives:UsabilityContext of useEmpathy for the end userAnd bang for bucks[CLICK]
  • Lets start with mobile “usability” [CLICK]
  • When we’re talking about usability, we can’t go past this guy – Jacob NielsenJacob’s has a well know UX training and publishing business called Nielsen Norman GroupThey have done a whole bunch of studies and reports on mobile usability over the past few years
  • For example, they tested the task completion rates of mobile web, apps and desktop sites in 2009 and again in 2011.This involved 8 rounds of usability testing - basically, how often user successfully achieved key tasks - on mobile devices in US, Australia, Hong Kong, and the UK[CLICK]In the 2011 study, user success ratesfor mobile native appswas 76% [CLICK]That was better than the success rates for mobile web sites at62% [CLICK]But still well behind desktop web success rate at 84%
  • For example, they tested the task completion rates of mobile web, apps and desktop sites in 2009 and again in 2011.This involved 8 rounds of usability testing - basically, how often user successfully achieved key tasks - on mobile devices in US, Australia, Hong Kong, and the UK[CLICK]In the 2011 study, user success ratesfor mobile native appswas 76% [CLICK]That was better than the success rates for mobile web sites at62% [CLICK]But still well behind desktop web success rate at 84%
  • As an outcome of this work Nielsen Norman identified 85 mobile usability guidelines in 2009. As you can imagine, this included practical advice like:Minimise contentSimple navigationMinimise click-pathsNo horisontal scrollingBlah blah…
  • By 2011 this had swelled to 237 usability guidelines.So if you prefer a “paint-by-numbers” approach to mobile interface design, you can buy a 293 page report detailing these guidelines from Nielsen Norman for about 400 bucks.
  • OR you can focus what actually matters when designing a mobile user experience [CLICK]You focus on the context of use and actual human behaviourAnd by the way, this is true not just for mobile but for design of ANY user experience[CLICK]
  • OR you can focus what actually matters when designing a mobile user experience [CLICK]You focus on the context of use and actual human behaviourAnd by the way, this is true not just for mobile but for design of ANY user experience[CLICK]
  • Solets have a look atcontext of use
  • This is the main screen of my smartphone. 15 or so apps, links and tools that I use the most and want at my finger-tips. As with most people, this screen represents quite a complex set of personas, environments and contexts that make up my life. For example, my phone is first and foremost a work tool [CLICK]
  • And many of the tools and apps help me be an Optimal CEO
  • Obviously I’m not always at work
  • So other tools and apps are non-work related[CLICK]By the way, those mojitos were pretty awful
  • Some are “apps” [CLICK]Others are links to mobile web pages
  • But more importantly…I use different tools and apps in different contexts and environments [CLICK]For example…[CLICK]
  • I listen to music and TED talks on the bus to work [CLICK]
  • I access my calendar, e-mail, CRM and chatter running between meetings [CLICK]
  • And I catch up on news, personal e-mail and social stuff in TV ad breaks flopping on the couch![CLICK]I’m fairly typical in this regard, Google says that 49% of our time in front of the TV we are also using a smartphoneAnd yes, that is my actual couch.
  • Just as important as context of use is to truly understand and empathise with the end userLet me demonstrate with a case study [CLICK]
  • Foraker Labs is a US interaction and user experience design consultancy based in Boulder, Colorado[CLICK]Foraker has worked with non-profit organisation Breastcancer.org for more than 10 yearsThey have developed an intimate understanding of the needs, wants and behaviours of women being diagnosed with, fighting, and surviving breast cancer. This is obviously quite a serious topic to have for breakfast so I ask you to bear with me for a moment – as this is an award-winning approach to mobile interaction design.When designing the web and mobile presence for Breastcancer.org, Foraker focused on critical points in time when women need access to accurate and relevant information. [CLICK]
  • Foraker Labs is a US interaction and user experience design consultancy based in Boulder, Colorado[CLICK]Foraker has worked with non-profit organisation Breastcancer.org for more than 10 yearsThey have developed an intimate understanding of the needs, wants and behaviours of women being diagnosed with, fighting, and surviving breast cancer. This is obviously quite a serious topic to have for breakfast so I ask you to bear with me for a moment – as this is an award-winning approach to mobile interaction design.When designing the web and mobile presence for Breastcancer.org, Foraker focused on critical points in time when women need access to accurate and relevant information. [CLICK]
  • For example, there is a critical point in time immediately following the diagnosis – literally as you are leaving the doctors office, walking out to your car - head spinning with scary and confusing information and medical terms. [CLICK]Breastcancer.org decided to be available at that particular point in time with a mobile web site to answer the most burning questions women have. These are questions that Google probably has 839,000 answers to – but 99% of them contradictory or incorrectIt doesn’t matter what phone you have and there is no need to download an app – just answers at your finger-tips [CLICK]
  • For example, there is a critical point in time immediately following the diagnosis – literally as you are leaving the doctors office, walking out to your car - head spinning with scary and confusing information and medical terms. [CLICK]Breastcancer.org decided to be available at that particular point in time with a mobile web site to answer the most burning questions women have. These are questions that Google probably has 839,000 answers to – but 99% of them contradictory or incorrectIt doesn’t matter what phone you have and there is no need to download an app – just answers at your finger-tips [CLICK]
  • [CLICK]When you get home, you can do further research on the Breastcancer.org website to learn and understand more about your condition. By now its about content, accurate answers to any conceivable question you want answered as you come to grips with your situationBreastcancer.org is a responsive website - so it reformats the same content regardless of what device you access it on [CLICK]
  • Once you have a plan of attack to fight back, Breastcancer.org provides a logged on community and personalised knowledge base that is specifically targeted to your situation and where you can connect with other people like you[CLICK]For this purpose Breastcancer.org and Foraker Labs provide an iPhone app that is always at your finger tips.
  • [CLICK]Or from any iOS device, wherever you are
  • The design methodology Foraker use is what we call user-centred design [CLICK]I don’t have time to go into details today, but it basically places the end user of any product or service at the core of the design process [CLICK] [CLICK] [CLICK] [CLICK]
  • ….it even has its own ISO standard
  • Finally, lets talk about investment in mobile web and app development
  • First of all – iOS rules, right?[CLICK]Guardian in the UK report a couple of weeks ago that Apple pockets 70% of global smartphone profits[CLICK]Samsung takes 37%[CLICK]and HTC takes 1%. Those of you good with numbers will have noted that these add up to more than 100% - that’s because the profit these guys make is offset by losses at Nokia, BlackBerry, LG and others[CLICK][CLICK]
  • Time for a pop quiz:Which mobile operating system was the global leader in mobile web page views in January 2012? [CLICK]Android, iOS, Symbian or BlackberryAnyonewanna have a guess?
  • It was Symbian[CLICK]With nearly 1/3 of all mobile internet page views[CLICK]
  • Lets have a look at it from another angle[CLICK]1.5 billion mobile handsets sold in 2011[CLICK]“Feature phones” – think Nokia – outsold smartphones 2:1 globally. Of all smartphones sold, less than 20% were iPhones[CLICK]So on a global basis, focusing on iOS is very short-sighted
  • But these stats are not relevant in New Zealand, right? [CLICK]
  • So lets do some numbers for this market…[CLICK]According to Google, smartphone penetration in New Zealand is now at 44%[CLICK]So simple maths tell us that a good mobile web site will give you access to at least 2,000,000 kiwis[CLICK]
  • But if you want to use a native app, the market is more fractured[CLICK]Android devices have 41% of the smartphone market so an Android app will reach 800,000 kiwis[CLICK]Apple has around 32% of the market or 630,000 kiwis
  • And if we assume that Apple is ¾ iPhone and ¼ iPad we are breaking the addressable market down even further…[CLICK]an iPhone app will reach about 10% of kiwisand an iPad app less than 4%
  • So lets bring the business case together…Lets say it costs $100k each to design, build, test and launch a brand-qualitymobile web site, iOS or Android app[CLICK]
  • This would mean that a mobile website costs $50 per 1,000 New Zealanders you can reachAn Android app costs more than double “per person reached” and an iPad app more than 12 times moreTo make it worse, a good mobile website is really non-negotiable – so you’ll be paying for that anyway.So, here is my advice:[CLICK]
  • This would mean that a mobile website costs $50 per 1,000 New Zealanders you can reachAn Android app costs more than double “per person reached” and an iPad app more than 12 times moreTo make it worse, a good mobile website is really non-negotiable – so you’ll be paying for that anyway.So, here is my advice:[CLICK]
  • From an investment point of view, it makes complete sense to start by building a kick-ass mobile website
  • And consider making your mobile site responsive so that it’ll scale to fit all different platforms, devices and browsers[CLICK]In fact, you can use “app wrappers” and other tricks to make your mobile site look and behave like a native app
  • So bang for your bucks can be useful decision making tool. But to finish off I want to bring you back to what actually matters…[CLICK]
  • When you design ANYTHING – including mobile strategies and interfaces – make sure you really understand the needs, behaviours and environments of the people who will use them…Otherwise you are just guessing…and probably wasting your money[CLICK]

What actually matters when designing for mobile What actually matters when designing for mobile Presentation Transcript