Building a Hacker Space - A Design Pattern Catalogue

1,815 views

Published on

Presented December 27 2007 by Jens Ohlig and Lars Weiler, at the 24th Chaos Communication Congress, Berlin.

Session page: http://events.ccc.de/congress/2007/Fahrplan/events/2133.en.html
Video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8lywXCZogsg
Presentation source code: https://github.com/larsweiler/Hackerspace-Design-Patterns

0 Comments
1 Like
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

No Downloads
Views
Total views
1,815
On SlideShare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
32
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
15
Comments
0
Likes
1
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Building a Hacker Space - A Design Pattern Catalogue

  1. 1. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionBuilding a Hacker SpaceJens Ohlig ‹jens@ccc.de› Lars Weiler ‹pylon@ccc.de›24th Chaos Communication CongressDecember 27, 2007J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  2. 2. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionOutline1 Introduction2 The Hacker Space Design Patterns Catalogue3 ConclusionJ. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  3. 3. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionWho we areOutline1 IntroductionWho we areWhy this catalogue?2 The Hacker Space Design Patterns CatalogueSustainability PatternsIndependence PatternsRegularity PatternsConflict Resolution PatternsCreative Chaos Patterns3 ConclusionThis is not a cookbookFind your nearest Hacker SpaceJ. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  4. 4. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionWho we areThe speakersJens• Co-Founder of ChaosComputer Club Cologne(C4)• Still active there• CCC-activist for more than15 years• CCC-spokesman,board-member etc.Pylon• Co-Founder of ChaosComputer Club Düsseldorf(Chaosdorf)• Now active in Cologne• CCC-activist for more thaneight years• CCC-spokesman,board-member etc.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  5. 5. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionWho we areChaos Computer Club Cologne• Founded in 1997• around 42 members• currently in Version 3.5 of our hacker space, operational inthat location since 1999• All pictures in this presentation has been taken in the C4hacker spaceJ. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  6. 6. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionWhy this catalogue?Outline1 IntroductionWho we areWhy this catalogue?2 The Hacker Space Design Patterns CatalogueSustainability PatternsIndependence PatternsRegularity PatternsConflict Resolution PatternsCreative Chaos Patterns3 ConclusionThis is not a cookbookFind your nearest Hacker SpaceJ. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  7. 7. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionWhy this catalogue?Thanks to the August 2007 hacker space tour• A group of American hackers visited hacker spaces in Germanyand Austria• They wanted to know how our European hacker spaces work• After the Camp they visited a couple of hacker spaces• Every hacker space did a presentation about their history• We created some Design PatternsJ. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  8. 8. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionWhy this catalogue?Design Patterns• Historically used for urban planning• Transfered for typical situations in software development• Problem → ImplementationJ. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  9. 9. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionWhy this catalogue?What we want to tell you• We want to share our knowledge of building our own hackerspace• We won’t give you a detailed manual• Your mileage may varyJ. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  10. 10. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionSustainability PatternsOutline1 IntroductionWho we areWhy this catalogue?2 The Hacker Space Design Patterns CatalogueSustainability PatternsIndependence PatternsRegularity PatternsConflict Resolution PatternsCreative Chaos Patterns3 ConclusionThis is not a cookbookFind your nearest Hacker SpaceJ. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  11. 11. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionSustainability PatternsThe Infrastructure PatternProblemYou have a chicken-and-egg-problem: What should come first?Infrastructure or projects?J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  12. 12. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionSustainability PatternsThe Infrastructure PatternProblemYou have a chicken-and-egg-problem: What should come first?Infrastructure or projects?ImplementationMake everything infrastructure-driven. Rooms, power, servers,connectivity, and other facilities come first. Once you have that,people will come up with the most amazing projects you didn’tthink about in the first place.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  13. 13. NOC with Server Racks
  14. 14. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionSustainability PatternsThe Grace Hopper PatternProblemIs now really the time to start your hacker space? Shouldn’t youwait? Have you really thought of all the problems?J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  15. 15. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionSustainability PatternsThe Grace Hopper PatternProblemIs now really the time to start your hacker space? Shouldn’t youwait? Have you really thought of all the problems?ImplementationSure it is the time!It’s always easier to ask forgiveness than it is to getpermission.(Grace Hopper, US Navy Rear Admiral and computer scientist)It’s important to start. Many problems you think of before willvanish as soon as you get started. When in doubt, do it!J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  16. 16. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionSustainability PatternsThe Community PatternProblemHow should your group communicate?J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  17. 17. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionSustainability PatternsThe Community PatternProblemHow should your group communicate?ImplementationYou are hackers, you know what to do. Stop slacking and set up amailing list, a wiki, and an IRC channel. You will need all three.Think about a platform for discussion, storage fordocumentation and real-time communication.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  18. 18. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionSustainability PatternsThe Critical Mass PatternProblemYou want to set up a hacker space in your city alone. You fail.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  19. 19. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionSustainability PatternsThe Critical Mass PatternProblemYou want to set up a hacker space in your city alone. You fail.ImplementationThe rule of thumb is 2 + 2. You need a partner to get the initialidea kicked off, making two of you. You need two more people inorder to get real work done. Don’t start before you are at least fourpeople. From this point it’s easy to recruit more people. Aim forten people for a start.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  20. 20. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionSustainability PatternsThe Strong Personalities PatternProblemNothing gets done. You all want the hacker space, but it’s so hardto get off your asses.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  21. 21. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionSustainability PatternsThe Strong Personalities PatternProblemNothing gets done. You all want the hacker space, but it’s so hardto get off your asses.ImplementationLook for strong personalities as members of your original group.You will need people with experience in building structures.Look for people who have authority (and get respect), not forpeople who use authority (and get laughed at).J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  22. 22. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionIndependence PatternsOutline1 IntroductionWho we areWhy this catalogue?2 The Hacker Space Design Patterns CatalogueSustainability PatternsIndependence PatternsRegularity PatternsConflict Resolution PatternsCreative Chaos Patterns3 ConclusionThis is not a cookbookFind your nearest Hacker SpaceJ. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  23. 23. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionIndependence PatternsThe Landlord and Neighbourhood PatternProblemYou have found the perfect hacker space, but the landlord seems tobe weird. Also, the neighbours are picky.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  24. 24. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionIndependence PatternsThe Landlord and Neighbourhood PatternProblemYou have found the perfect hacker space, but the landlord seems tobe weird. Also, the neighbours are picky.ImplementationChoose wisely. A benevolent, but uninterested landlord and coolneighbours can be the decisive reasons why the hacker space takesoff or not. Not so cool neighbours may call the cops at 2 AM.Depending on your projects, this may be a serious problem. Ashackers you do not live the majority lifestyle—look for neighbourswho are also weird and outside the majority.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  25. 25. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionIndependence PatternsThe Roommate Anti-PatternProblemYou need a space for meetings and as a lab, to store and work onmaterials for projects. In order to minimize rent or out of sympathy,you think it’s great when someone lives in your space. Butsomehow it doesn’t work, as you cannot use the lab anymore.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  26. 26. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionIndependence PatternsThe Roommate Anti-PatternProblemYou need a space for meetings and as a lab, to store and work onmaterials for projects. In order to minimize rent or out of sympathy,you think it’s great when someone lives in your space. Butsomehow it doesn’t work, as you cannot use the lab anymore.ImplementationGuest are fine, but don’t let anyone live there. Kick them out ifnecessary.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  27. 27. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionIndependence PatternsThe Séparée PatternProblemYou want to chill, discuss, or work in small groups. But the mainroom is occupied: There are simply too many people at your space.Or you want to smoke a cigarette at the space without disturbingnon-smokers.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  28. 28. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionIndependence PatternsThe Séparée PatternProblemYou want to chill, discuss, or work in small groups. But the mainroom is occupied: There are simply too many people at your space.Or you want to smoke a cigarette at the space without disturbingnon-smokers.ImplementationLook for a hacker space with smaller, separate rooms. Usecurtains or doors to separate them from the main room. Separaterooms can also be used for smokers in a non-smoking hacker space.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  29. 29. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionIndependence PatternsThe Kitchen PatternProblemAs a human being, you need food. As a hacker, you need caffeineand food at odd times.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  30. 30. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionIndependence PatternsThe Kitchen PatternProblemAs a human being, you need food. As a hacker, you need caffeineand food at odd times.ImplementationHave a kitchen at your space. Nothing brings people together likecooking together. Have fridges for Club-Mate. Selling soft-drinkswill help you raise money for the rent. Invest in the single mostimportant piece of hardware: a dishwasher. Have a freezer forpizzas and buy decent kitchen equipment. Show nerds how tocook real food.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  31. 31. The Kitchen
  32. 32. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionIndependence PatternsThe Coziness PatternProblemAll work and no play makes Jack a dull boy. There must besomething else than only workstations and electronics.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  33. 33. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionIndependence PatternsThe Coziness PatternProblemAll work and no play makes Jack a dull boy. There must besomething else than only workstations and electronics.ImplementationBring in couches, sofas, comfortable chairs, tables, ashtrays,ambient light, stereo equipment, a projector, and video gameconsoles. Bringing in plants didn’t work for us.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  34. 34. The Fnordcenter
  35. 35. Our Poor Plant Named “Egor”. . .Sep. ’06 Dec. ’07
  36. 36. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionIndependence PatternsThe Shower PatternProblemAfter long hacking sessions, you will start to smell funny. Also,guests to your space seem to neglect personal hygiene.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  37. 37. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionIndependence PatternsThe Shower PatternProblemAfter long hacking sessions, you will start to smell funny. Also,guests to your space seem to neglect personal hygiene.ImplementationThe discriminate hacker space has a bathroom with a shower.After a long hacking night you’ll have the best ideas while taking ashower. Guests from other hacker spaces may stay for several days.Ideally you will buy a washing machine to get rid of all the smellytowels.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  38. 38. The Bathroom (extract)
  39. 39. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionIndependence PatternsThe Membership Fees PatternProblemYou need to pay your rent and utilities. Larger projects need to befunded.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  40. 40. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionIndependence PatternsThe Membership Fees PatternProblemYou need to pay your rent and utilities. Larger projects need to befunded.ImplementationCollect fees regularly. Make no exceptions, ever. Choose anappropriate amount. Have discounts for students. Have at leastthree months of rent on your account, all the time, no exceptions.Elect a totalitarian treasurer.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  41. 41. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionIndependence PatternsThe Sponsoring Anti-PatternProblemYou think it’s a good idea to meet at a company that likes you orat a university where most of you study anyway.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  42. 42. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionIndependence PatternsThe Sponsoring Anti-PatternProblemYou think it’s a good idea to meet at a company that likes you orat a university where most of you study anyway.ImplementationNever ever depend your space on external sponsors. Donationsare great, but remember that companies can go bankrupt and youwon’t be a student forever. Meeting at a university will excludehigh-school kids or people who don’t like the university culture. Nocompany, no matter how nice, will give away presents foreverwithout asking for favours in return. That’s capitalism. . .J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  43. 43. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionRegularity PatternsOutline1 IntroductionWho we areWhy this catalogue?2 The Hacker Space Design Patterns CatalogueSustainability PatternsIndependence PatternsRegularity PatternsConflict Resolution PatternsCreative Chaos Patterns3 ConclusionThis is not a cookbookFind your nearest Hacker SpaceJ. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  44. 44. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionRegularity PatternsThe Plenum PatternProblemYou want to resolve internal conflicts, exercise democraticdecision-making, and discuss recent issues and future plans.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  45. 45. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionRegularity PatternsThe Plenum PatternProblemYou want to resolve internal conflicts, exercise democraticdecision-making, and discuss recent issues and future plans.ImplementationHave a regular meeting with possibly all members. Have anagenda and set goals. Make people commit themselves to tasks.Write down minutes of the meeting and post them on a mailinglist and/or Wiki. Go for the only date that works: once a week.Weird dates like “first full-moon after the third Friday” will neverwork. Likewise doesn’t every other week or anything similar.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  46. 46. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionRegularity PatternsThe Tuesday PatternProblemEvery weekday sucks. You will not find any day when every hackercan attend a meeting. Someone always has an appointment.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  47. 47. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionRegularity PatternsThe Tuesday PatternProblemEvery weekday sucks. You will not find any day when every hackercan attend a meeting. Someone always has an appointment.ImplementationMeet on Tuesday. Since all days are equally bad, just pick theTuesday. End of discussion.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  48. 48. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionRegularity PatternsThe OpenChaos PatternProblemYou want to draw in new people and provide an interface to theoutside world.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  49. 49. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionRegularity PatternsThe OpenChaos PatternProblemYou want to draw in new people and provide an interface to theoutside world.ImplementationHave a monthly, public, and open lecture, talk or workshop.Announce it at your local time (no UTC, CEST, EST or somethingelse). Invite interesting visitors to your regular meetings and don’ttell the weirdos about them.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  50. 50. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionRegularity PatternsThe U23 PatternProblemYour older members graduate from college or get married. Yourspace needs fresh blood.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  51. 51. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionRegularity PatternsThe U23 PatternProblemYour older members graduate from college or get married. Yourspace needs fresh blood.ImplementationRecruit young people through a challenge you set up for them, inform of a course that spans several weeks. Overwhelm themwith problems from hardware and software hacking and let themsolve it in teams. Prepare for the challenge and tutor them, butgive them room to experiment. Retire after the team-building andlet the smartest of the young ones run the space.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  52. 52. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionRegularity PatternsThe Sine Curve PatternProblemYou did everything right. You had some big events and a nice timein your shiny hacker space. But after some time the enthusiasmgoes away and your projects are stagnating.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  53. 53. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionRegularity PatternsThe Sine Curve PatternProblemYou did everything right. You had some big events and a nice timein your shiny hacker space. But after some time the enthusiasmgoes away and your projects are stagnating.ImplementationPeak enthusiasm at a hacker space has the form of a sine curvewith a cycle duration of four years. Keep the hacker spacerunning, even if the feel-good-factor is temporarly on holidays.Chances are your space will be awesome again in two years. Don’tgive up! Maybe an exciting new member will knock on your doortomorrow.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  54. 54. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionConflict Resolution PatternsOutline1 IntroductionWho we areWhy this catalogue?2 The Hacker Space Design Patterns CatalogueSustainability PatternsIndependence PatternsRegularity PatternsConflict Resolution PatternsCreative Chaos Patterns3 ConclusionThis is not a cookbookFind your nearest Hacker SpaceJ. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  55. 55. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionConflict Resolution PatternsThe Consensus PatternProblemYou need a group decision and want to make sure no one gets leftbehind.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  56. 56. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionConflict Resolution PatternsThe Consensus PatternProblemYou need a group decision and want to make sure no one gets leftbehind.ImplementationUse the weekly plenum for discussion. Don’t take votes—discussuntil everyone agrees.For some problems this pattern is the best.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  57. 57. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionConflict Resolution PatternsThe Democracy PatternProblemYou need to make a group decision. Discussion does not seem tolead you anywhere.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  58. 58. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionConflict Resolution PatternsThe Democracy PatternProblemYou need to make a group decision. Discussion does not seem tolead you anywhere.ImplementationUse the weekly plenum for discussion. Do take votes—thestrongest minority wins over the weaker minorities.For some problems this pattern is the best.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  59. 59. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionConflict Resolution PatternsThe Command PatternProblemNobody does the dishes. Your hacker space looks crappy. No oneseems to care.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  60. 60. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionConflict Resolution PatternsThe Command PatternProblemNobody does the dishes. Your hacker space looks crappy. No oneseems to care.ImplementationOrder people to do the dishes, take out the trash, keep theinfrastructure up and running. Yell, if necessary! But alwaysparticipate.For some problems this pattern is the best.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  61. 61. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionConflict Resolution PatternsThe sudo leadership PatternProblemYou started as a community of like-minded people, but suddenlyyou find yourself in a dictatorship run by a single hacker.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  62. 62. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionConflict Resolution PatternsThe sudo leadership PatternProblemYou started as a community of like-minded people, but suddenlyyou find yourself in a dictatorship run by a single hacker.ImplementationDo not have ranks. Use leadership temporarily, like for projectsand when you really need it. Don’t have a single root.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  63. 63. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionConflict Resolution PatternsThe Responsibility PatternProblemYou volunteered for the task of running a critical piece ofinfrastructure, e.g. the mail server, but you feel the sudden urge toslack.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  64. 64. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionConflict Resolution PatternsThe Responsibility PatternProblemYou volunteered for the task of running a critical piece ofinfrastructure, e.g. the mail server, but you feel the sudden urge toslack.ImplementationJust because volunteer work doesn’t get paid doesn’t mean it’s lessimportant. Remember that you will directly hurt your friends andthe hacker space. Take pride in your volunteer work. It willmake you grow stronger as a person and is satisfying. When yourealise that you really cannot do the job any more, your last taskis to hand it over.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  65. 65. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionConflict Resolution PatternsThe Debate Culture PatternProblemYou are in the middle of your weekly plenum. Everybody’s yelling,nothing gets done.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  66. 66. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionConflict Resolution PatternsThe Debate Culture PatternProblemYou are in the middle of your weekly plenum. Everybody’s yelling,nothing gets done.ImplementationMany geeks have very poor debate skills, the result of years offlame wars on the Net. Make people with actual social skillslead the discussion. Those with a background in real-life politicalwork (e.g. student council) were best for our group. Learn fromthem. Learn not to interrupt others.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  67. 67. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionConflict Resolution PatternsThe Bikeshed Anti-PatternProblemYou suggest creating something new for your hacker space, like abikeshed. But now everybody discuss about it’s colour. Nobikeshed will be built.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  68. 68. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionConflict Resolution PatternsThe Bikeshed Anti-PatternProblemYou suggest creating something new for your hacker space, like abikeshed. But now everybody discuss about it’s colour. Nobikeshed will be built.ImplementationThat’s a known problem. If you suggest something what everybodyelse in your hacker space can build, they will take part in thediscussion. And if it’s only the colour of the bikeshed, the designof the T-shirts, the Linux-distribution on the server, etc. Nerdstend to discuss trivial problems in epic detail, while more complextasks will be ignored. Identify pointless discussion like these andjust end them.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  69. 69. History of the Bikeshed-ProblemC. Northcote Parkinson wrote a book in the early 1960s,called “Parkinson’s Law”, which contains a lot of insightinto the dynamics of management.. . .In the specific example involving the bike shed, the othervital component is an atomic power-plant, I guess thatillustrates the age of the book. Parkinson shows how youcan go into the board of directors and get approval forbuilding a multi-million or even billion dollar atomic powerplant, but if you want to build a bike shed you will betangled up in endless discussions.see http://www.bikeshed.com/
  70. 70. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionConflict Resolution PatternsThe Private Talk PatternProblemSomeone causes a problem that cannot be resolved in the group.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  71. 71. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionConflict Resolution PatternsThe Private Talk PatternProblemSomeone causes a problem that cannot be resolved in the group.ImplementationLet some experienced member of your group talk to thetrouble-maker in private. Listen to the person. Let them knowhow the group feels about the problem without exposing them infront of the group.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  72. 72. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionCreative Chaos PatternsOutline1 IntroductionWho we areWhy this catalogue?2 The Hacker Space Design Patterns CatalogueSustainability PatternsIndependence PatternsRegularity PatternsConflict Resolution PatternsCreative Chaos Patterns3 ConclusionThis is not a cookbookFind your nearest Hacker SpaceJ. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  73. 73. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionCreative Chaos PatternsThe Old Hardware PatternProblemYou can’t bring in shiny new hardware, as there is no space left.Your space has become a hardware museum filled with junk.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  74. 74. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionCreative Chaos PatternsThe Old Hardware PatternProblemYou can’t bring in shiny new hardware, as there is no space left.Your space has become a hardware museum filled with junk.ImplementationCreate a pile/stack where you put that old, unused hardware on.Let everybody take from it. Anything left within a while should bethrown away. But make sure you announce that step not onlyonce, but at least three times with an escalation system.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  75. 75. (Sorry, in German only)Bereitstellung von Hardware im Chaoslabor§1 Das Chaoslabor ist ein Bereich vorbildlicher Ordnungund Sauberkeit, in dem der Chaos Computer ClubCologne e.V. seine Vereinstätigkeit ausübt.§2 Unter Aufräumpersonal werden Personen verstanden,die sich um den Zustand des Clubraumes kümmern.Aufräumpersonal genießt Heldenstatus und Immunitätgegenüber Anfeindungen von Besitzern nichtfunktionierender Hardware.. . .see http://wiki.koeln.ccc.de/index.php?title=Hacker_Space/Hardware-Gesetz
  76. 76. A Stack of Old Hardware
  77. 77. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionCreative Chaos PatternsThe Key PatternProblemYou want the hacker space accessable all the time. You don notwant to call somebody else during night to lock the hacker spacewhen you leave.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  78. 78. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionCreative Chaos PatternsThe Key PatternProblemYou want the hacker space accessable all the time. You don notwant to call somebody else during night to lock the hacker spacewhen you leave.ImplementationHand out keys. Track who owns a key. Have a good lock sothat nobody can copy the key without your permission. Collect adeposit for the key, so that the owner takes care for it. Or build anice electronic locking system (with all cool things and all messyproblems). . .J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  79. 79. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionCreative Chaos PatternsThe Club Mate PatternProblemYou need to raise funds. You want to stay up longer during night.You want to receive really good impressions without drugs.J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  80. 80. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionCreative Chaos PatternsThe Club Mate PatternProblemYou need to raise funds. You want to stay up longer during night.You want to receive really good impressions without drugs.ImplementationBuy at least one pallet of Club-Mate and sell it in your hackerspace. You will realise the results very soon!J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  81. 81. Golden Club-Mate
  82. 82. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionThis is not a cookbookOutline1 IntroductionWho we areWhy this catalogue?2 The Hacker Space Design Patterns CatalogueSustainability PatternsIndependence PatternsRegularity PatternsConflict Resolution PatternsCreative Chaos Patterns3 ConclusionThis is not a cookbookFind your nearest Hacker SpaceJ. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  83. 83. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionThis is not a cookbookConclusion• There is no “golden way” building up a hacker space• Based on experience there are a couple of patterns whichmight match• Be creative! Try out your own way!• Question & Answer session @24C3: Day 1, 17:15,Workshoproom AJ. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  84. 84. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionFind your nearest Hacker SpaceOutline1 IntroductionWho we areWhy this catalogue?2 The Hacker Space Design Patterns CatalogueSustainability PatternsIndependence PatternsRegularity PatternsConflict Resolution PatternsCreative Chaos Patterns3 ConclusionThis is not a cookbookFind your nearest Hacker SpaceJ. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue
  85. 85. Introduction Design Patterns ConclusionFind your nearest Hacker SpaceHacker Spaces (not complete)Germany, Austria, Switzerland:• CCC-based → http://www.ccc.de/regional/• Netzladen → http;//www.netzladen.org/• Das Labor → http://www.das-labor.org/• c-base → http://www.c-base.org/USA:• NYC Resistor → http://www.nycresistor.com/• Seattle• San Francisco• L.A.Australia:• TheHacktory → http://thehacktory.com/J. Ohlig, L. Weiler 24C3A Hacker Space Design Pattern Catalogue

×