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Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
Emerging Technology for Learning
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Emerging Technology for Learning

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At the fall 2011 Chief Learning OFfic

At the fall 2011 Chief Learning OFfic

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  • Introduce speakers & companies
  • Today we will be talking about 4 emerging technologies that have important implications for elearning: Video, Games & simulations, Mobile and Social These are buzzwords you hear every day. Our objective is to provide you with actual, concrete examples of how these technologies are being applied in the workplace today – and to give you some tips to get started.
  • Let ’s start by thinking about what elearning looks like today: and unfortunately it’s not very pretty. Powerpoint slides that are full of text that ’s probably hard to read. Maybe there are narrations, animations or special effects. How does this kind of learning feel? It depends on the learner to focus, absorb and figure out how to apply this raw information in his day-to-day life.
  • Our view is that the world should look more like this: <play clip> Interesting, interactive content that captures learner ’s interest, gives them an opportunity to practice new skills and, with social networks wrapped around the content, connects them to peers to compare notes, share ideas and talk about their questions.
  • The current model of education and professional training is one-directional. An instructor or leader lectures or broadcasts information, and the learner memorizes the information to regurgitate it for an assessment. This is how most of us experienced school – as passive classroom participants, with few opportunities to practice and apply skills in the real world. But, in real life, our supervisors and managers don ’t test our learning with a multiple choice quiz. They test us by evaluating how well we accomplish complex tasks.
  • So how do emerging technologies change this model? A few months ago a cable guy came to install cable at my house. He was working with new equipment and had a question about how to install a specific part. I watched him use his mobile phone to pull up a video that explained how to install the new part. After he finished, he realized he knew a quicker way to install it. Here ’s where technology could be even more powerful: he could go back to his organization’s wiki and share his suggestion. He might even use his iphone to record a new video clip. Today we ’re going to show you how using new technologies can help you create this powerful, connected learning environment. We’ll start with video. (hand it over to Dan)
  • Video is hot. Apparently 2011 is the year of the video – but I hear Masie said that last year and the year before, too. I think this time he ’s right! Llet ’s start by getting our definitions straight. Video is NOT a narrated PowerPoint slide show – as a rule of thumb, just because there is a slider bar at the bottom doesn’t make it a video. Video IS dynamic content (action) shot with a fancy camera, your mobile phone or something in between.
  • Why should you use video for learning? The average television consumption in America per individual in 2010: is 34 hours / week (Nielsen Company). This is a TV generation. It ’s what people are used to, comfortable with and can connect to, effortlessly. Think about how TV works – You watch 7 minutes of content followed by commercials. You ’re used to sustaining attention for short chunks of time The typical workplace isn ’t very different – a University of California, Irvine study found that the average amount of time people work without interruptions is 11 minutes. This is what workers are used to doing – and chunks of video training fits into what people are used to doing.
  • Video is perfect for bringing content to life with a human face. Have you seen Sal Khan ’s TED talk? People who are captivating educators and speakers in real life are captivating speakers on video. Sometimes, they’re more captivating in video. Using videos for learning and training makes the information infinite, accessible and engaging.
  • Useful for training people in interpersonal communication and customer service. Nothing brings information to life more than video – and gives people opportunities to watch clips again, take their time an master content. Video is excellent for communication, sales, marketing, and even customer (extended enterprise) training
  • Does anyone watch Julia Child ’s old cooking show? Remember Bob Ross’ paint by numbers? Or maybe you’ve watched a YouTube clip to learn how to fix a flat on your bike, do a complicated math problem or stuff a turkey? Video makes it easy to observe, learn and apply complex new skills. You can watch a video over and over again and no one will judge you. This makes “showing” someone something possible no matter what time it is or where they are.
  • Finally, the beauty of video is that once you ’ve created once, you can deploy many times across different platforms and opportunities. This is portable knowledge that engages.
  • This ej4 video on employment law basics takes a fairly dull topic and brings it to life with engaging presentation and memorable examples. This isn ’t expensive or hard to do – it just takes a little thought and planning.
  • New cameras make capturing professional-quality video easy and accessible to anyone. Even your iphone is a very effective video camera. Widely available editing programs are affordable and easy to use – even intuitive. Finally, better broadband and mobile internet means it ’s easy for anyone to access, anywhere. This is unlocking training development to anyone – it takes content development out of the hands of the Flash developer and puts it in the hands of the subject matter expert. It also unlocks a new method for rapid development. It doesn ’t have to take months to develop a new course – it can be done in an hour and deployed today.
  • A few production tips for creating video training. Start with the end in mind. What is your goal? What is the learning outcome or end state that you ’re hoping to achieve? Think of the relevant questions, examples,or vignettes and start storyboarding. Be creative. Don ’t shoot the exec in the office with the bookshelf or sitting behind the big large desk – show the learners something they can connect to – show them their jobs in action. Make it natural
  • As a final note, remember that video can effectively be used not only by creating it yourself but by curating and sharing video resources that exist throughout the web. Out of hundreds of millions of videos on YouTube, there ’s probably something that will help you tell your story – even if it’s just something showing what not to do.
  • How many of you guys play digital games? Angry Birds? Words with friends? What about Farmville? As you know if you ’ve played these games, they’re addictive. Once you start, you just can’t stop until you’ve accomplished your goal. As Jane McGonigal explains in her book “Reality is Broken”, games are engaging because they create positive emotions and allow you to accomplish goals while taking risks. Games make you feel good, and you bring the emotions and new skills from games into your real life. In the context of workplace learning, games represent opportunities to engage people in practicing and applying new skills – perfect for them to try new things before tackling challenges in real life and for a refresher on skills they ’ve studied in the past. Games make learners active participants in the content, taking the lead in applying new information to different situations. x Learners playing games develop self-confidence and new skills in a fun environment.
  • This is Tandem Learning ’s “The Change Game”. They explain the components of being resilient and leading change – and then present you with situations where you lead a team toward a goal by making the best choices for coping with change. If you make good choices, the starship makes it safely to its destination! PLAY VIDEO 30-60 seconds
  • This is Mastering Management from Enspire Learning. This simulation presents the concepts of managing teams and then engages people in evaluating team members and making leadership decisions. PLAY VIDEO (30-60 seconds) [After the trailer plays, Josh narrates what ’s going on] Here, I ’m assigning my team members to different tasks Once I ’ve made the assignment, I meet with each of my team members and coach them through the steps they’ll take to help me find the treasure After each interaction, my manager gives me feedback on how I ’ve chosen to interact with my teammates. This is a great example of giving people engaging environments where they can practice skills in a fun setting, with no serious consequences
  • While the last two courses we ’ve showed you have a high production value and sophisticated design, a successful simulation doesn’t have to be produced by Hollywood. “ Price for Success” is an example of a course that has the same useful interactions with simple design and minimal development costs. This simulation asks salespeople to set the “right” price for a batch of widgets. Too high, and the customer storms out! Just right and you make money and the customer is satisfied.: PLAY COURSE CLIP (Josh, you ’ll need to explain what’s happening while the slider is moving)
  • When designing games, start by defining the skills or abilities you want the learner to have mastered by the end. Then think about the activities that will drive this outcome. For example, is it a matching game? A race against a colleague? A role playing game? Start by storyboarding the interactions and then identify the software tools and specific elements that will enable learners to develop these skills.  A good game has challenges that are hard but not too hard, an element of chance, and positive engagement with peers.
  • You can get started building games for your organization or learning environment using some of the off the shelf game templates that do not require any programming or technical skills whatsoever. Both the elearning brothers and DIY eLearning have game templates where you can add content to a game framework. This is a really quick and simple way to build some interactive, engaging play into your workplace learning environment. Also, authoring tools like Rapid Intake offer game templates where you can include game- play tools in elearning courses. Has anyone successfully used games in their organization? Any examples of successful applications? Now I ’m going to turn it back over to Dan to talk about “mLearning “ – or using mobile devices to increase access to learning content.
  • Let ’s start with a definition. Mobile learning is information or content accessed through a mobile device. Why does it matter? Mobile technology provides learners with an opportunity to access learning information in the context in which they will apply it (augmenting learning on the job with YouTube, for example).
  • We recommend developing content for the mobile platform – deploying a long, complex elearning course through a mobile phone is unlikely to succeed. What ’s the situation in which someone is using mobile devices to access learning information? They need help. They have a problem they need to solve. They want something that’s quick and to the point. They want to be able to navigate directly to the information that makes the most sense for them.
  • New cameras make capturing professional-quality video easy and accessible to anyone. Even your iphone is a very effective video camera. Widely available editing programs are affordable and easy to use – even intuitive. Finally, better broadband and mobile internet means it ’s easy for anyone to access, anywhere. This is unlocking training development to anyone – it takes content development out of the hands of the Flash developer and puts it in the hands of the subject matter expert. It also unlocks a new method for rapid development. It doesn ’t have to take months to develop a new course – it can be done in an hour and deployed today.
  • The Sprint reps were not required to watch the programs, yet sales support estimated that 80% had completed the programs. This greatly surprised Sprint. The comments of the reps were universally positive. THE BIG PAYOFF? Sprint approved Agilis ’ iBIS as a vendor partner product that SMB reps could sell. Sprint remains Agilis’ largest customer to date. Lessons learned/what worked here? Instead of making learning an event, which requires a change in schedule, a change of pace, a change of location – this alternative platform makes the learning and information accessible within the existing workflow.
  • Social learning is knowledge or skills acquired through interactions and communication between people. Social learning occurs all the time, with or without social media – but the use of social media tools can accelerate and enable social learning in organizational environments. Has anyone here been using Twitter to network at this conference? Have you learned anything through backchannel conversations? If you ’re not using Twitter yet, I encourage you to visit twitter and search #elce for people talking about the sessions they’re attending. This is a real example of learning and networking through social media – and an example of what you can do in your organization to connect your colleagues.
  • Jane Bozarth tells the story of an ethnographer, Julian Orr, who studied a group of Xerox repairmen in the 80s. Every day the repairmen had lunch together – talking about the problems they encountered and sharing solutions. Orr discovered that the mentorship and development of creative solutions occurred when the employees were on break – not when they were participating in formal training.
  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, people learn 70% of what they know about their jobs informally, through social interactions. So what could the Xerox repairmen ’s lunch break look like in today’s workplace? In a distributed network of employees worldwide, that in-person collaboration becomes more complicated. This is where social media tools can facilitate those old-fashioned water cooler conversations. Let ’s take a look at an example of social learning environments. This is Yammer, is an enterprise social network to allow colleagues to communicate quickly. It can replace email for internal communication and also facilitate new people working together. This is the water cooler, online. We use it at OpenSesame to share new ideas, avoid overfilling email inboxes and maintain a record of important discussions.
  • According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, people learn 70% of what they know about their jobs informally, through social interactions. So what could the Xerox repairmen ’s lunch break look like in today’s workplace? In a distributed network of employees worldwide, that in-person collaboration becomes more complicated. This is where social media tools can facilitate those old-fashioned water cooler conversations. Let ’s take a look at an example of social learning environments. This is Yammer, is an enterprise social network to allow colleagues to communicate quickly. It can replace email for internal communication and also facilitate new people working together. This is the water cooler, online. We use it at OpenSesame to share new ideas, avoid overfilling email inboxes and maintain a record of important discussions.
  • If you ’re motivated to start connecting your peers and colleagues to create more collaboration opportunities, you don’t need a budget. You can use free tools like Google Sites,LinkedIn, Facebook and Twitter to connect people in your organization. Social media for learning can be as simple as creating a hashtag your colleagues can use to filter conversations on Twitter – or creating a closed Facebook group where colleagues can share ideas and compare notes. If you ’re interested in building something customized, you can use tools like Yammer , Bloomfire , SocialCast and Jambok to build your organization’s social network. (You can find more information about all of these applications on our blog)
  • There are a few basic steps for getting started with social media for learning. Pick your technology. Evaluate different options and pick a platform that makes sense for your organization. Don ’t try to do too much at once! Think of yourself as the host of the party. Your most important role will be as the facilitator and icebreaker who introduces people to one another. Get conversations started and invite people to participate in conversations they may have overlooked. Be a role model by showing what can be accomplished with your social media efforts. Share useful content, start conversations and be interesting. information that would be useful to your community members.
  • Thanks so much for the opportunity to show examples of new technologies in action in the connected workplace. Here ’s our contact information, and we encourage you to continue following up with us and asking questions.
  • Transcript

    • 1. Emerging Technologies Taking advantage of rapidly evolving elearning solutions #CLOet Josh Blank Tom Turnbull
    • 2. Emerging Technologies <ul><li>Video </li></ul><ul><li>Games & Simulations </li></ul><ul><li>Mobile </li></ul><ul><li>Social </li></ul>
    • 3. The De Facto Solution <ul><li>“ Slideware” </li></ul>
    • 4. The Potential
    • 5. Old School & New School
    • 6. Models for Transforming Learning
    • 7. Video for Learning Hot hot hot quotes build in a video screen &quot;The introduction of video into almost every aspect of our learning and work tasks is profound... “ Learning TRENDS by Elliott Masie - March 2, 2010 “ 2011 is the year of video” Learning TRENDS by Elliott Masie - March 2, 2010
    • 8. Why choose video? Entertain me. Get to the point. Cool screen. THE TV GENERATION 7 11
    • 9. Where can I use video? <ul><li>The potential to put a “human face” on your content; increasing audience engagement / emotional response </li></ul>
    • 10. Where can I use video? <ul><li>The best way to portray social interaction </li></ul>
    • 11. Where can I use video? <ul><li>Highly efficient means to explain / simplify complex and nuanced procedures </li></ul>
    • 12. Create once, Deploy many Initial learning Meetings Coaching Refresh Performance support
    • 13. Employee Training Employment Law Basics ej4 Slideshare doesn’t support our video embedding. To see a sample, please visit: www.opensesame.com/ej4
    • 14. How to make video? <ul><li>Quality Affordable HD video technology dramatically improves picture detail </li></ul><ul><li>Distribution Technology Mature video streaming technology enables wireless distribution to computers, TV ’s, and mobile devices </li></ul>Speed & Affordability Now anyone can shoot, edit, and distribute content in a single day!
    • 15. Video: Production Tips <ul><li>Start with the end in mind </li></ul><ul><li>Budget & Schedule </li></ul><ul><li>Subject matter experts </li></ul><ul><li>Detailed scripting & storyboarding </li></ul><ul><li>Audience focus group </li></ul>
    • 16. Video: Best Practices Produce Make it yourself! Resources Logistics Curate Find something that works! Availability Applicability Cost / Benefit
    • 17. Games & Simulations <ul><li>What makes games addictive?  </li></ul><ul><li>- Rewards & positive feelings </li></ul><ul><li>Chance </li></ul><ul><li>Accomplishable tasks with measurable outcomes </li></ul><ul><li>Engagement with a community </li></ul>
    • 18. Case Study: Games for Learning The Change Game Tandem Learning Slideshare doesn’t support video embedding. To see a sample, please visit: www.opensesame.com/tandemlearning
    • 19. Case Study: Simulations Mastering Management Enspire Learning Slideshare doesn’t support video embedding. To see a sample, please visit: www.opensesame.com/courses/enspire-learning/mastering-management-coaching
    • 20. Case Study: Simulations Price for Success BlueVolt Slideshare doesn’t support video embedding. To see a sample, please visit: https://www.opensesame.com/courses/bluevolt/price-success
    • 21. Games & Simulations: Production Tips Start by defining the end point. Define the challenge – and the next level up. Design the interactions.
    • 22. Games: Production Tips <ul><li>Game Templates: </li></ul><ul><li>Elearning Brothers (www.elearningbrothers.com) </li></ul><ul><li>DIY eLearning (www.diyelearning.com) </li></ul><ul><li>Rapid Intake (www.rapidintake.com) </li></ul>
    • 23. Mobile Learning Mobile technology provides learners with an opportunity to access learning information in the context in which they will apply it
    • 24. How to use mobile? <ul><li>“ Gotta be…” </li></ul><ul><li>Short -  1-2 minutes </li></ul><ul><li>Easily found      </li></ul><ul><ul><li>Through a search function      </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>User-friendly Navigation must be optimized for small screen </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Convenient Push content to the user </li></ul></ul><ul><ul><li>Simple If you have to teach how to use it – it’s too complicated </li></ul></ul>
    • 25. Ritz-Carlton: The Mobile Martini Slideshare doesn’t support video embedding. To see a sample, please visit: http://youtu.be/gMd-3PEzNj8
    • 26. OK – that was a fake example… <ul><li>Don’t be afraid to create simple form content </li></ul><ul><li>You can do a lot with very little </li></ul><ul><li>Creativity is the driver of good learning </li></ul><ul><li>It was a really good martini! </li></ul>
    • 27. What is Social Learning?   Social networks enhance & improve learning content developed with all forms of media we've discussed.
    • 28. Where Does Social Media Fit?
    • 29. Case Study: Yammer
    • 30. Case Study: #lrnchat
    • 31. Social Media for Learning Tools Free, Open Networks Twitter LinkedIn Wikis Quora Google Sites Enterprise Networks Yammer Bloomfire SocialCast Jambok Ning Saba
    • 32. Tips & Tricks: Social Choose your tools Make introductions Be a role model
    • 33. Presenters Josh Blank www.OpenSesame.com [email_address] @OpenSesameNow Tom Turnbull www.OpenSesame.com [email_address] @TomTurnbull

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