OpenAIRE at EARMA Conference, June 2011
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European Research in the OpenAIRE: Infrastructure & Support for Open Access to Scientific Information EARMA Conference June 24, 2011, Bragança - Birgit Schmidt, Univ. of Goettingen; Eloy Rodrigues, ...

European Research in the OpenAIRE: Infrastructure & Support for Open Access to Scientific Information EARMA Conference June 24, 2011, Bragança - Birgit Schmidt, Univ. of Goettingen; Eloy Rodrigues, Univ. of Minho; Willow Fuchs, Univ. of Nottingham

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OpenAIRE at EARMA Conference, June 2011 OpenAIRE at EARMA Conference, June 2011 Presentation Transcript

  • European Research in the OpenAIRE: Infrastructure & Support for Open Access to Scientific Information EARMA Conference June 24, 2011 Bragança Birgit Schmidt, Univ. of Goettingen Eloy Rodrigues, Univ. of Minho Willow Fuchs, Univ. of Nottingham
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011 Overview Open Access How to comply with the EC/ERC OA policies Practical experiences in the UK About OpenAIRE Some examples & conclusions
  • Open Access: what, why and how
  • Open Access is the immediate, online, free availability of research outputs – free of charge and free of most licensing restrictions.  Open Access includes the outputs that scholars normally give away for free for publication; it includes peer-reviewed journal articles, conference papers and datasets of various kinds. What is Open Access?
  • Open Access : Why? Increases access, visibility, and impact of research results Promotes the progress and efficiency of science and sparks innovation Maximizes the return of investment in science by making publicly-funded research freely and publicly available Allows better monitoring, evaluation and management of research activities OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011
  • Open Access: How?  Gold OA: Open Access Journals, that don’t establish any restriction or barrier on access to the articles they publish (currently more than 6500 journals, ≃ 26% of total number of journals- see www.doaj.org).  Green OA: Self-archive/deposit a copy of journal articles into Open Access repositories, institutional or disciplinary (currently almost 2000 – ver www.opendoar.org /).
  • Open Access in EU
  • Open Access in the EU The European Comission and the European Research Council want to provide the widest dissemination and access to the results of the research they fund.
  • European Research Council December 2007 ERC Scientific Council publishes Guidelines for Open Access, as a follow up of its 2006 Statement on Open Access. ERC, requires: that all peer-reviewed publications from ERC-funded research projects be deposited on publication into an appropriate disciplinary or institutional repository, and subsequently made Open Access within 6 months of publication.
  • Open Access Pilot in FP7 August 2008 European Commission launched the Open Access Pilot in FP7 that will run until the end of the Framework Programme The pilot covers approximately 20% of the FP7 budget and applies to 7 research areas: 1. Energy 2. Environment (including Climate Change) 3. Health 4. Information and Communication Technologies (Cognitive Systems, Interaction, Robotics) 5. Research Infrastructures (e- infrastructures) 6. Science in society 7. Socio-economic sciences and the humanities
  • Open Access Pilot in FP7 Grant agreements in those 7 areas, signed after August 2008, contain a special clause (Special Clause 39) requiring beneficiaries: 1. to deposit articles resulting from FP7 projects into an institutional or subject based repository 2. to make their best efforts to ensure open access to these articles within six months (Energy, Environment, Health, Information and Communication Technologies, Research Infrastructures) or twelve months (Science in Society, Socio- economic Sciences and Humanities
  • Open Access in the EU Chapter 2.5.2. of the Digital Agenda for Europe – Driving ICT innovation by exploiting the single market – refers to effectively managed knowledge transfer activities and states that publicly funded research should be widely disseminated through Open Access publication of scientific data and papers. Europe 2020 Flagship Initiative Innovation Union has a similar Open Access clause: the Commission will promote Open Access to the results of publicly funded research; and it will aim to make Open Access to publications the general principle for projects funded by the EU research Framework Programmes.
  • Open Access in the EU “The question is no longer „if‟ we should have open access. The question is about „how‟ we should develop it further and promote it.” Neelie Kroes Vice President of the European Commission for the Digital Agenda
  • How to comply
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011 Complying with FP7and ERC requirements What to deposit? Where to deposit? When to deposit?
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011 What to deposit? Published version – publisher’s final version of the paper, including all modifications from the peer review process, copyediting and stylistic edits, and formatting changes (usually a PDF document) OR Final manuscript accepted for publication – final manuscript of a peer-reviewed paper accepted for journal publication, including all modifications from the peer review process, but not yet formatted by the publisher (also referred to as “post-print” version).
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011 Where to deposit? Institutional repository – of the research institution with which they are affiliated OR (If this is not possible) Subject based/thematic repository OR Orphan Repository provided by OpenAIRE for articles that can be stored neither in institutional nor in subject-based/thematic repositories
  • Deposit workflow 18 OpenAIRE presentation Paris 16.3.2011 18
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011 When to deposit? Researchers should deposit their articles or manuscripts in a relevant repository immediately upon acceptance for publication, to be made open access within six or twelve month depending on the FP7 research area 6 Months Access Embargo 12 Months Access Embargo ERC All grant recipients after 2007 FP7 in the thematic areas: "Health", "Energy", "Environment" (including Climate Change)", and "Information & communication technologies" (“Cognitive Systems”, “Interaction” and “Robotics”) in the activity: "Research infrastructures" (e-infrastructures) in the thematic area: "Socio-economic Sciences and the Humanities" in the activity: "Science in Society"
  • OA Publishing Costs 100% refund: For other activities not covered by paragraphs 1 and 2, inter alia, management activities, training, coordination, networking and dissemination (including publications), the contribution may reach a maximum of 100% of the total eligible costs. (FP7 Grant Agreement, Annex II General Conditions, Article 16.4 )
  • Practical experiences in the UK
  • Funder Polices 15 UK Funder policies (including Research Councils) + International See Low compliance www.sherpa.ac.uk/juliet/
  • Does your current / usual funding agency have an open access policy or mandate? (Responses for 65 that did have mandate)
  • Does your institution have a repository? 130 responses. All had a repository.
  • 0% 10% 20% 30% 40% 50% 60% 70% 80% 90% 100% my institutional has an OA policy or mandate my subject area has a self-archiving culture my funder has an OA policy or mandate it results in academic reward it results in professional recognition it can result in a citation advantage it helps me to make contact with potential collaborators it helps me to get information out more quickly it increases the amount of publicity of my work I believe the results of publicly-funded research… it improves accessibility to my work When I DO make my work open access (OA), I do it because: Strongly disagree or disagree Neutral Agree or strongly agree
  • 0% 20% 40% 60% 80% 100% I do not know how to make my work OA it is just not a concern of mine it takes too much time and effort (I’m too busy) I do not know much about OA I am concerned about plagiarism I have concerns about copyright I am concerned about publishers’ legal rights I am concerned about peer review it is too expensive I need to publish in high impact journals When I DO NOT make my work open access (OA) it is because: Strongly disagree or disagree Neutral Agree or strongly agree
  • Swan, A and Brown, S. (2005) Open Access self-archiving: An author study (Key Perspectives Limited, Cornwall, UK), http://eprints.ecs.soton.ac.uk/10999/1/jisc2.pdf “If your employer or research funder REQUIRED you to deposit copies of your articles in an open archive, what would be your reaction?”
  • What you can do to support OA • Learn about institutional and funder policies • Find out how your research grant workflow fits with your institutional repository • Inform academics about IP and copyright issues • Tell your colleagues about Open Access and the requirements that your institution needs to meet
  • • Manage research outputs in accordance with institutional policies • Link your research management system with your OA repository • Support “gold” OA with an institutional OA publishing fund
  • About OpenAIRE
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011 OpenAIRE: Implementing the Open Access Pilot in All EU Member States 31 12/2009 – 11/2012
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011 The Project OpenAIRE = Open Access Infrastructure for Research in Europe December 2009 – November 2012 Budget: 5 Mio. with 4,1 Mio. EC contribution Partners: All EU member states (except Luxembourg) plus Norway 32
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011 Main Goals Deliver “an electronic infrastructure and supporting mechanisms for the identification, deposition, access, and monitoring of FP7 and ERC funded articles”. Additionally, offer “a special repository for articles that can be stored neither in institutional nor in subject- based/thematic repositories”. All deposited articles will be visible and freely accessible world-wide through a new portal to the products of EU-funded research, built as part of this project. Work with several subject communities to explore the requirements and practices to deposit, access and manage research datasets in combination with research publications. Helpdesk Orphan repository OpenAIRE portal Study & OpenAIREplus
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011 OpenAIRE & EU Agenda OpenAIRE‘s aims & activities embed into >> Digital Agenda for Europe >> Innovation Union Current EC consultations – Green Paper on a Common Strategic Framework (CSF) for future EU Research and Innovation Funding – consultation & hearing in May – Communication announcing EC policies and actions within the future Common Strategic Framework (CSF) / Proposal of a set of actions for Member States – by the end of 2011
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011 Slides: http://www.slideshare.net/ccbuhr/access-to-scientific- information-the-role-of-the-eu-8234428
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011 Slides: http://www.slideshare.net/ccbuhr/access-to-scientific- information-the-role-of-the-eu-8234428
  • OpenAIRE Portal
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011 Let us know about your publications If you have already deposited your publication into an OA repository >> Claim your publication If you haven‘t done this yet >> Deposit your publication
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011 Claim publications If repository is not OpenAIRE compliant Announce your publication
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011 Claim publications
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011 OpenAIRE Compliant Repositories Find out if your institutional repository is OpenAIRE compliant In July 2010 the OpenAIRE team released the OpenAIRE Guidelines 1.0 - for content providers of the OpenAIRE information space http://www.openaire.eu/en/component/attachments/download/31.html If not, get it validated Advocate for compliance at your local library
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011 If no institutional or disciplinary repository available use the
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011 After registration & login you can upload publications
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011
  • Helpdesk
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011
  • OpenAIRE presentation EC information day Health 09.06.2011 www.openaire.eu
  • Some examples & conclusions
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011EU Offices – December 14, 2010
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011 Tools
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011 Conclusions: How to support your researchers Inform researchers about eligibilty of publication costs and ask them to add a budget to Project Proposals. (GA Annex II.16.4) During the project – Check the FP7 projects for Special Clause 39 and researchers of the IDEAS/ERC programme – Inform project coordinators and researchers about their obligations resulting from the EC/ERC open access policies – Provide resources online: leaflet, checklist, link to local library and helpdesk on www.openaire.eu – Use NCP newsletters to promote the OA policies – Follow-up with researchers and help with them with their final report Collaborate with your local library – Provide an OA repository and adjust to OpenAIRE Guidelines – Working together with the research office inform researchers about the OA policies and support them in copyright issues – Help identifying and uploading publications – Promote the OA policies on website and at events 55
  • OpenAIRE @ EARMA 24 June 2011 Further Information OpenAIRE website http://www.openaire.eu Further details on the open access pilot in FP7 http://ec.europa.eu/research/science- society/open_access Follow us on twitter: @OpenAIRE_eu