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  • Blog – have employees participate, enable commenting, etc.
  • Who are you trying to have a dialogue with via social? Think about that relationship. What are you trying to help them achieve?
  • You will see that these vary from being very specific to somewhat vague and aspirational.
  • What value are you providing your audience now and what will you still be providing in the future?
  • Radian6 enables organizations to become Socially Engaged Enterprises, with the power to understand and gain insights about social media through metrics, measurement, sentiment and analytics reporting. Our social media listening, tracking, monitoring and engagement tools allow organizations to successfully employ a social media strategy and understand the impact the Social Graph and Social CRM have on their success. Radian6 can also provide advice on how to use social media guidelines, best practices, case studies and training for your staff.
  • http://www.radian6.com/radian6-powers-dells-social-media-listening-command-center/Centralized hubs can be basic but effective. This is NVIDIA’s official social media-monitoring hub, and how we stay plugged into the social web. It also serves as a training center to help NVIDIAns participate in social conversations, using apps like TweetDeck and Spredfast.It also happens to be where Shanee Ben-Zur gets to work every day, keeping an eye on fans’ comments. I take all their feedback and deliver it to the right people here, whether the comments are good, bad or just for fun.The command center boasts eight 22-inch Samsung monitors on a custom wall-mount, powered by two Quadro NVS 450 professional graphics cards. The wall of monitors makes for an impressive display that attracts lots of visitors, including our top execs.  We use watt-stoppers to conserve energy use in the Social Media Command Center when it’s not in use.Whenever we launch a new driver or product, I stay posted at my station to monitor social media traffic, as do others in the customer care and driver teams. When fans have issues, we identify NVIDIA employees who are best suited to help, and mobilize to resolve these issues as quickly as possible. When fans indicate that they like certain features, we try to focus on those in future releases.The Social Media Command Center allows NVIDIA to  address fan feedback quickly. While we may not be able to answer each tweet or forum post directly, fans should know that we’re reading all your comments and we definitely care.
  • GlassDoor is a resource you can use to see what people are saying about your brandTap into Q&As to see what people are askingWe can learn
  • Some companies approach social media as just another advertising channelNo one likes to be messaged to like this.
  • Kohl’s engages in a conversation by asking a question. “What did you get?”Their goal was to engage in a conversation with people. Reference ideas for us
  • FedEx Response was quick and textbook, but not perceived as authentic. It seemed stiff. Didn’t seem authentic. It also did not link to the original video, but everyone saw it.
  • Rich Edelman has been blogging weekly since 2004. Need info on Kevin Roberts blog
  • AARP team members listen and respond on Twitter, with author designations (e.g. ^TG)Good tactic for accounts with multiple uses/posters
  • MichaelLazerow – CEO of Buddy Media
  • SOURCE: http://blogs.starbucks.com/blogs/customer/archive/2012/03/30/over-200-ideas-launched.aspxStarbucks has a site where people can make suggestions on how they should improve. The key difference is that the suggestions are public, and people can vote for their favorite suggestions. Here’s an example of automatic ordering. Note that there is a status update here “Under Review”.http://mystarbucksidea.force.com/
  • “Connect + Develop helps P&G pursue outside ideas, solutions, processes—and even market-ready products—that might meet current or emerging customer needs” – P&G Website50% of product innovations come from outside contributors.
  • https://secure3.verticali.net/pg-connection-portal/ctx/noauth/PortalHome.doSept 6, 2011 Example of open innovation success: One notable Procter and Gamble problem that was solved by an outside scientist involved a product the company wanted to develop to keep cotton shirts wrinkle-free. P&G could not come with an anti-wrinkle method on its own and so approached a knowledge broker who posted a few details of the dilemma to its network of solvers.From the volume of submissions received a solution was found, though it came from an unusual place, not one that P&G had expected. The answer was sent in from the laboratory of a professor studying polymers related to the semiconductor industry. His idea when applied to garments neatly solved P&G’s wrinkle problem. http://www.ideaconnection.com/open-innovation-success/Open-Innovation-Solution-to-a-Cotton-Shirts-Wrinkling-00144.html
  • initiative in the following areas, at a high level.

Vivaki Social PR Workshop Vivaki Social PR Workshop Presentation Transcript

  • VivaKi Social PR Workshop August 15, 2012
  • Agenda Overview & Intros VivaKi Social Strategy Analysis of Social Networks Overview of Free Social Tools Building A Social Strategy & Roadmap Guidelines, Policies & Best Practices Closing Remarks and Q&A LUNCH!! © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 2
  • Our Social Media Sherpas Michael Wiley Michoel Ogince Chief Social Media Officer Director, Product & Platform Strategy VivaKi Big Fuel © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 3
  • IntroductionsWho are you?What is your role and where does social fit in?Where are you based?Obligatory Awkward Ice Breaker Question: Mostinteresting or embarrassing person you’re following on Twitter? © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 4
  • VivaKi’s Social Strategy
  • 10 years: evolution of socialBrands begin shifting LBS & social Enterprises beginconsiderable shopping take hold. organizing aroundresources to social Social CRM emerges social businesscampaigns as a discipline imperatives Brands increasingly name social agencies of record2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 6
  • Preamble Review Each VivaKi brand must be a competent guide and resource in Social since Clients are looking for ideas simply and efficiently delivered across paid owned and earned connections - Need to understand what will be expected from our Clients To ensure full suite of expertise is available to each brand we will need to upgrade, share and borrow/buy to fill gaps - Need a framework to benchmark and organize our resources and expertise All expertise, tools and possible acquisitions will be linked to one of our four large brands or the VNC and we will not be creating a central resource - Need clarity for what a small central global VivaKi social team does relative to the Brands. © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 7
  • Theme 1: Growing Budgets, Strategy Deficits
  • Budgets Continue to Increase © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 9
  • Organizational Indecisiveness Still Reigns © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 10
  • An Optimal Approach Has Marketing at theCenter © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 11
  • Lack of Integration © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 12
  • How We Win (Theme 1) Become the “go to” counselors for social media by: Giving our MARKETING clients the strategies they need to articulate a path forward for their companies Insuring that we produce holistic perspectives and integrated solutions that are social by design Pairing strategies with executional and operational excellence Offering deep specialization in core social media platforms and disciplines © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 13
  • Theme 2: Social Networking is a Global Opportunity
  • Asia-Pacific has three times as many socialnetwork users as North America 4 out of 10 live in the Asia- Pacific region © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 15
  • This year, more than 1.4 billion peopleworldwide will use social networks © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 16
  • MENA will have highest growth in 2012.Slowest growing: North America © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 17
  • This year, APAC will pass North America asthe region with the most Facebook users APAC 212.7 million NORTH AMERICA 157.3 million © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 18
  • China’s social network audience is big –and getting bigger With Facebook blocked, Chinese social networks and microblog sites will see strong growth © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 19
  • India and Indonesia will see the fastestuser growth this year, each up over 50% © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 20
  • Summary Number of social network users worldwide: 1.4 billion by the end of 2012. Largest social networking region: Asia-Pacific, with nearly 616 million users by year’s end. Country with the most social network users: China, with more than 307 million in 2012, nearly double the number in the US. Countries where social networking is growing the fastest: India and Indonesia, which will each see 50%+ growth in users this year. © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 21
  • The Center of the Universe
  • The New Facebook Formula Timeline offers broader creative canvas as do stories which can feature photos, videos and links. Page posts drive paid content Premium ads to appear in desktop and mobile newsfeeds Reach Generator increases organic content distribution Facebook “offers” create viral coupon and promotional opps © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 25
  • Implications for Our Clients Integration of creative, PR, media and customer care functions is an imperative Social strategy in general and Facebook in particular must be central to communications planning Community management and editorial calendars are table stakes; Multimedia storytelling and paid/owned/earned content optimization are differentiators Premium and marketplace strategies must be in synch Brands must be “Always On” with iterative testing and campaign spikes to enhance engagement © 2010. All rights reserved. VivaKi. Proprietary and Confidential. 26
  • How We Win (Theme 2) Big picture: Less thinking, more doing Articulate cohesive Facebook strategies for clients Talent development: Create Facebook-centric roles that focus on paid owned earned expertise Brand Architecture and page management Premium and marketplace ads/Fan acquisition Content development/storytelling and optimization Insights, Marketing, Open Graph API expertise Take advantage of our global footprint to optimize global/regional/local implementations Leverage our collective spend for our clients’ benefit Integrate Facebook programs with other paid owned earned efforts © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 27
  • Theme 3: Innovate and Execute on the Run
  • We Need to Evolve FasterNo excuses approach: Talent : Bridge talent and expertise gaps by leveraging staff currently serving in adjacent roles Tools: Establish clear partners for co-developing and delivering core services and to fill system-wide gaps Collaboration: Leverage Vivaki/Groupe capability across brands rather than reinventing for speed to market © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 29
  • VivaKi Social StackWhat it is: A framework that establishes core disciplines A visual means for assessing capability A common language © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 30
  • The VivaKi Social Stack Data analytics & measurement Listening, monitoring & reporting Conversation research & insights Social CRM Social commerce Social media planning & buying Content strategy, development & management Community management & engagement Influence and Advocacy Social business strategy, design & planning © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi. Proprietary and Confidential. 31
  • How We Win (Part 3) Leverage the Social Stack to upgrade share borrow; improving collaboration, cross-pollination and vendor management Surface enterprise-level opportunities so that economies of scale can be realized and best practices can be socialized Source internally first, build only if necessary; Resist the desire to re-invent or duplicate and build in silos Re-invent the Vivaki Social Council Create more training opportunities © 2010. All rights reserved. VivaKi. Proprietary and Confidential. 32
  • Conclusions Social Networking in general and Facebook in particular can be global business growth drivers We need to move faster – to scale and transition our talent and expertise to meet demand Clients are looking for deep specialization – we need to provide it We need to upgrade, share and borrow © 2010. All rights reserved. VivaKi. Proprietary and Confidential. 33
  • Analysis of Social Networks
  • About Big Fuel Pure-play social media agency Hollywood meets Madison Avenue 8 teams Big Fuel Social Labs Clients: Samsung, T-Mobile, Gatorade, SPG © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 35
  • Analysis of Social Networks © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 36
  • Facebook: Should You Leverage? © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 37
  • Facebook: Should You Leverage? © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 38
  • Facebook Insights Metrics around content (ROI) Two categories of insights: - User: page likes, daily active users, new likes/unlikes, demographics, tab views - Interactions: post likes, comments, impressions, mentions, wall posts © 2010. All rights reserved. VivaKi. Proprietary and Confidential. 39
  • Twitter: Should You Leverage? © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 40
  • Twitter: Should You Leverage? © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 41
  • Google+: Should You Leverage? © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 42
  • Google+: Should You Leverage? © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 43
  • YouTube: Should You Leverage? The world’s second largest search engine 81% of internet users watch online videos More than just text & still images Success with pro video & amateur Direct viewers to social & .com Built-in analytics © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 44
  • Pinterest: Should You Leverage? 11 million monthly users Demographic: >80% F, affluent 25-44yrs Image/photography heavy brand 40% of all social media driven purchases © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 45
  • Pinterest: Should You Leverage? © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 46
  • LinkedIn: Should You Leverage? © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 47
  • LinkedIn: Should You Leverage? © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 48
  • Instagram: Should You Leverage? 80 million users 40% of the top 100 brands on Instagram Secret weapon: Mobile Behind the scenes Influencer marketing network Viral through hashtags Customer or employee content curation Measure: Satigr.am © 2010. All rights reserved. VivaKi. Proprietary and Confidential. 49
  • Instagram: Should You Leverage? © 2010. All rights reserved. VivaKi. Proprietary and Confidential. 50
  • Tumblr: Should You Leverage? Users: 55% < 34yrs @ 30k per year Secret weapon: Media Social product functionality Fashion brands are a success! Check out Vogue on Tumblr Media brands: NPR Short-lived, campaign based © 2010. All rights reserved. VivaKi. Proprietary and Confidential. 51
  • Overview of Free Social Tools
  • Dad: “Michoel…”Me: “Yes, dad?”Dad: “Remember this for life:there is no such thing as a freelunch.
  • The Landscape © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 54
  • Outline Social Media Management Systems (SMMS) Facebook Tab Applications Social Listening © 2010. All rights reserved. VivaKi. Proprietary and Confidential. 55
  • Social Media Management Systems (SMMS) Publish Content Listen (in and out of house) Measure ROI © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 56
  • SMMS: Use Cases  Intense Engagement  Social Broadcasting  Platform Campaign Marketing  Distributed Brand Presence  Tailored Customizations © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 57
  • SMMS: Free Tools HootSuite TweetDeck Buffer App © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 58
  • SMMS: Free Tools - HootSuite Multiple networks Scheduled posts Robust analytics Facebook insights Google analytics Twitter profile stats Analytics reports Teams © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 59
  • SMMS: Free Tools - TweetDeck Multiple networks - limited, single window view Watch videos in TD Desktop notifications Downloadable No analytics © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 60
  • SMMS: Free Tools - Buffer App Engagement optimization tool Freemium model Post via: - Buffer website - Browser add-ons - Buffer plugin - Buffer email - Analytics © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 61
  • SMMS: For a Few Dollars… Advanced analytics Engagement & influence scoring Top performing posts Follower demographics Advanced monitoring Track relevant keywords Filter by images, news, blogs Competitor & industry tracking Workflow permissioning © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 62
  • Facebook Tab Applications RSS Feed Twitter YouTube Flickr Static HTML © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 63
  • Social Listening Platform Analyze conversations Breaking links Trending topics Recent comments Trending people © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 64
  • Thank You! Twitter: @Twabbi Website: www.mountainclimber.me Email: michoelo@bigfuel.com © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 65
  • Live Demos
  • Building a Social Strategy & Roadmap
  • Learnings from Altimeter 20 social experts from across VivaKi July 18-19th in San Francisco, CA Intensive two-day workshop on social business strategy development Led by Altimeter founder and co-author of bestseller Groundswell, Charlene Li Special appearances/presentations by leading Altimeter research analysts Jeremiah Owyang and Brian Solis © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 68
  • The Social Strategy Process Identify Social Objectives Create A Social Vision Develop Social Initiatives Craft A Coherent Strategy Roadmap Organize for Social Readiness © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 69
  • Identify Social PR Goals© 2012 Altimeter Group
  • Examples of Typical Social PR Goals Increase brand awareness Gain new business leads/identify prospective clients Share thought leadership & unique perspective Elevate brand positioning Attract great talent Promote your best work Expand your global footprint Join the industry conversation Gain insights/feedback on your performance Stay current on competitive landscape © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 71
  • Prioritize Your Goals Understand the • Objectives may differ: Corporate, top strategic business unit, departmental,objectives for your organization regional, and customer segments. Identify where and how social • Understand how social can potentially initiatives create value make a difference Align social goals • This is and metrics with HARD but attainment of business goals doable! © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 72
  • Prioritize Your Goals Business Goal Business Metric Social Goal Social MetricMaintain leadership Increase retention Implement Use page views,role as home to the rate and new digital employee-centric engagements andbest digital talent hires by 20% blog within employer reputation recruitment site, to gauge illustrating why your performance. company is a great place to workDiversify client Increase percentage Leverage social Track clicks, “likes”,portfolio to include of luxury retailer channels to share fans, followersmore luxury retailer clients by 10% thought leadership retweets and assessbrands on marketplace analytics to trends & place determine how it is greater emphasis translating to behind retail/luxury business leads. goods research & news © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 73
  • Activity – 15 minutes Individually or with a colleague, think about your agency or team’s business goals. Complete the Aligning Business and Social Goals & Metrics Worksheet by listing no more than five of your agency’s business goals. Develop social goals and social metrics for each business goal you list. Be prepared to share your findings with the group. © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 74
  • Create A Social Business Vision© 2012 Altimeter Group
  • A Strategic Social Business Vision What is it?  A short, engaging and inspiring statement of what your ideal ―customer‖ relationship will look like in the future. What’s the value? - Focuses on the relationship - Provides clarity on where you are headed - Inspires people to solve for a compelling future - Aligns and guides all aspects of your social business strategy © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 76
  • Vision Statements To humanize the company by connecting constituents with Ford employees and with each other when possible, providing value in the process. Helping People Around the World Eat and Live Better To create a better everyday life for the many people. © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 77
  • Criteria for a Good Social Strategy VisionStatement Short Memorable Aspirational Actionable Consistent with business mission & valuesThe secret: Don’t over think it. © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 78
  • Criteria for a Good Social Strategy VisionStatement Focus on the relationships in the future. Think of the statement as a story that you could tell about that relationship. Keep centered with values and purpose that drive your company. These don’t change over time. Reference your Social Goals, but don’t be tied to them. Write a statement that will stand the test of time – and of technology. Do it quickly – your gut reaction is usually right. - Don’t wordsmith! © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 79
  • VivaKi Social Vision StatementTo encourage the exploration of ideas that accelerate our clients’ ability to connect with people. © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 80
  • Activity – 15 minutes 5 minutes. Individually, write a ONE sentence vision statement. NOTE: This should be a 3-year vision. 10 minutes. In a small group, share your individual statement. You can choose to revise or combine elements of more than one statement. Be prepared to share your findings with the group. © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 81
  • The Social Strategy Process Identify Social Objectives Create A Social Vision Develop Social Initiatives Craft A Coherent Strategy Roadmap Organize for Social Readiness © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 82
  • Develop Social Business Initiatives© 2012 Altimeter Group
  • Five Categories of Social Business Initiatives Dialog Advocate Learn Support Innovate © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 84
  • Five Categories of Social Business Initiatives Dialog Advocate Learn Support Innovate © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 85
  • Definition of Learn:Using social technologies to listen and learn from customers who are already speaking. 86
  • What Should You Listen For?Metric InsightBrand Sentiment How the public views your brandConversation Drivers Primary factors influencing conversation about your brandNegative Conversation Drivers Most significant topics negatively influencing your brand(Primary areas of risk)Positive Conversation Drivers Most significant topics positively influencing your brand(Primary areas of opportunity)Performance Over Time How you compare—from a positive and negative standpoint— against past performancePerformance Compared to How you compare—from a positive and negative standpoint—Industry Average against competitive set?Performance Compared How you compare against performance benchmarks that youto Benchmark have set for yourselves © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 87
  • Start with basic monitoring tools © 2010. All rights reserved. VivaKi. Proprietary and Confidential. 88
  • Paid Services Provide Monitoring Other Providers: © 2010. All rights reserved. VivaKi. Proprietary and Confidential. and more… © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 89
  • Listening Centers Can Be Basic but Effective Gatorade uses Radian6 and IBM to power its Mission Control Center, which tracks conversations and provides data visualizations & dashboards. Dell uses Salesforce Radian6 to power its social media monitoring of over 22K customer conversations on the social web. © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 90
  • Leverage Local Presence to Listen & Learn Ritz Carlton propertymanagers are known to monitor mentions © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 91
  • Leverage Owned Sites to learn more aboutyour fans/followers Pay attention to likes, shares, retweets and audience interactions © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 92
  • Other Resources for Listening/Learning Review Sites Q&A Sites Blogs/Other Resources © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 93
  • Listening Best Practices Start with the free and inexpensive tools like Google search, Google blog search, Twitter search. Use terms related to your services, executives, and competitors. Quickly advance by using brand monitoring software and services. Don’t scope too tight or too wide. The savvy will focus on pain points –not just brand mentions. © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 94
  • Five Categories of Social Business Initiatives Dialog Advocate Learn Support Innovate © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 95
  • Definition of Dialog Using social technologies to initiate or respond to conversations in social channels. © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 96
  • Social isn’t just another advertisingchannel… #notimpressed © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 97
  • Use social to engage in conversations © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 98
  • Build trust before a crisis happens… © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 99
  • And know how to respond © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 100
  • People Don’t Trust Company Representatives “When forming an opinion of a company, if you heard information about a company from each person, how credible would the information be?” Academic or expert 68%Technical expert in the company 66% A person like yourself 65% Regular employee 50% NGO representative 50% Financial or industry analyst 46% CEO 38% Govt official or regulator 20% Percent responding “very credible” or “extremely credible” Source: Edelman Trust Barometer, January 2012 © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 101
  • Have continuous, not episodic, dialog © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 102
  • Use Author Designations for Personal Touch © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 103
  • Know How to Respond to Antagonists © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 104
  • Dialog Best Practices Have the right mindset: Once you start, customers are expecting you to maintain the conversation. Like in real life, the same rules of conversation etiquette apply. Be a good listener, considerate, kind, and thoughtful. As a best practice, first listen to the conversation then add value to existing discussions. Rely on ongoing findings from brand monitoring to define a ―conversation calendar.‖ Don’t let antagonists bring down the conversation © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 105
  • Five Categories of Social Business Initiatives Dialog Advocate Learn Support Innovate © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 106
  • Definition of Advocate Recruiting an ―unpaid army‖ of highly engaged fans to promote your brand through social technologies © 2010. All rights reserved. VivaKi. Proprietary and Confidential. 107
  • 5-Phase Approach Formalizing an Advocacy Program Phase 1: Phase 2: Phase 3: Phase 4: Phase 5:Get Ready Identify Build Amplify Voices Foster GrowthInternally Advocates Relationships © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 108
  • Identity Advocates Employees - Advocates for culture, philanthropy, thought leadership and talent Business Partners - Advocates for industry leadership, joint ventures, groundbreaking work/research, recognition o E.g. Microsoft, Google, AOL, Facebook © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 109
  • How To Find and Engage Them Create vision and goals Develop policies and guidelines Find the right people  Look at #/quality of followers and fans, marketplace influence and overall content. Inspire them and give them a voice  Help foster passion for your brand; introduce them to interesting things they may not have been privy to before. Celebrate their willingness to vocalize your brand story. Incentivize them  Thank them for their contributions, whether it be virtually or via small gifts/perks. Promote their work  Employees: Give them a name by aligning their POV with your brand.  Business Partners: Return the favor and help them promote their brand and their great work. © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 110
  • How to Amplify Voices Encourage advocates to form and talk to each other Foster an ongoing dialog  Involve advocates beyond just marketing or support – intake their feedback  Educate advocates at key moments, like during crises Provide ongoing opportunities, content and platforms, to help amplify advocate voices © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 111
  • Advocacy Best Practices Don’t only think of advocacy in terms of short-term needs. Cultivate ongoing relationships with enthusiastic employees and partners. Put advocates front and center –e.g. acknowledge wherever possible to reward their loyalty – and invite them into the company. Promote partners as they support you – allow relationship to be mutually beneficial in nature, but not disingenuous. © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 112
  • Five Categories of Social Business Initiatives Dialog Advocate Learn Support Innovate © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 113
  • Definition of SupportAssisting your customers directly, or by facilitating peer-to-peer support, via social technologies © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi. Proprietary and Confidential. 114
  • Support best practices Mindset: Customers complaints are opportunities, not threats. Caution: As companies accelerate their social support efforts, responding to customers in social channels reinforces the behavior of complaining in public. Fix the root issues, beyond the customer complaints. Know when to support customers –and when to shift to private channels. Plan for long-term integration of social support into traditional support structures. © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 115
  • Five Categories of Social Business Initiatives Dialog Advocate Learn Support Innovate © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 116
  • Definition of Innovate Using social technologies to source and collect customer feedback on current or future products and services. © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 117
  • Starbucks involves 50 people around theorganization in innovation Tens of thousands of customers have submitted, commented, and voted on ideas at My Starbucks Idea. As of March 2012, more than 200 have been implemented. © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 118
  • P&G Looks Outside for Innovation—Consumers, Suppliers and Others “Connect + Develop helps P&G pursue outsideideas, solutions, processes—and even market-ready products” © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 119
  • P&G is Making Outside-In InnovationIncreasingly Public and Social “We are interested in collaborating with innovators in areas such as packaging, design, distribution, business models, marketing models, consumer research methods, trademark licensing, technology, and new products or services” – Bruce Brown, CTO, P&G © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 120
  • What Can We Do As PR Professionals? Crowdsource for creative ideas & content - Find new ways of communicating - Surface compelling stories/achievements to share socially Become early adopters for new social tech Be change agents for corporate culture & structure Support and help publicize agency innovation efforts, celebrate contributors: - Starcom ―Project Greenlight‖ Initiative - The AOL Pool Lane for online video ad models © 2010. All rights reserved. VivaKi. Proprietary and Confidential. 121
  • Innovate best practices Look inside and outside of your agency for ideas. Leverage social technologies and train leadership/employees on their benefits Help socialize innovation efforts internally and externally (depending on whether or not it can be shared) Provide frequent updates to ideas implemented, or give general status updates of ideas in the works © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 122
  • Craft a Coherent Strategy Roadmap© 2012 Altimeter Group
  • Strategy Roadmap Process © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 124
  • 1. Collect/Brainstorm Potential Initiatives With your teams, set aside time to brainstorm potential initiatives. - Involve a diverse group of people to get different perspectives. - Use it as an opportunity to build alignment with key players. Keep centered with your vision statement and clear understanding of social business goals. Keep strategic with a future time frame, for example, initiatives for the next three years. Afterward, group similar initiatives together. © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 125
  • 2. Detail Initiatives & RequirementsInitiative Name __________________________________________Category ______________________Describe the initiative in the following areas, at a high level.Total Priority Score: Leave blank until scoring is done © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 126
  • 3. Prioritize initiatives against businessvalue and capabilities You can’t do everything, so what is most important to do? Assess and prioritize initiatives against two primary criteria - Value to the Organization. The value this initiative will bring to your company in terms of supporting primary business objectives (e.g., increasing sales and retention, expansion, providing exceptional customer experience) - Capabilities. The overall capability of your company to execute on this initiative where accounting for incumbent technology, labor, skills, as well as company culture and ability to scale Add additional criteria only if it’s essential to prioritization © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 127
  • Prioritizing Initiatives with Scoring Value to the Organization. The value this initiative will bring to your company in terms of supporting primary business objectives (e.g., increasing sales and retention, expansion, providing exceptional customer experience) - 1 = provides very little value - 3 = provides limited value - 5 = provides very strong value to the organization Capabilities. The overall capability of your company to execute on this initiative where accounting for incumbent technology, labor, skills, as well as company culture and ability to scale - 1 = requires many capabilities that your company currently lacks, - 3 = requires some capabilities your company lacks and others it currently has - 5 = requires few if any capabilities your company doesn’t already have © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 128
  • 4. Build Your Time-based Roadmap Using your scoring, assemble an initial timetable for your initiatives. Don’t try to do too much too quickly! Redo it now from a strategic goal perspective - Are you favoring some goals over others? Understand how some initiatives need to happen first in order to support future initiatives. Balance out against how you need to get resources hired/trained and technologies in place. © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 129
  • Example: 3 Year Roadmap  Example: Social Business Initiatives,12-18 Timeline Category Initiative Now – 6 6-12 by months months months months months 18-24 24-30 30-36 monthsLearn Initiative 1Dialog Initiative 2Advocate Initiative 3Support Initiative 4Learn Initiative 5Dialog Initiative 6Support Initiative 7Advocate Initiative 8Innovate Initiative 9Advocate Initiative 10Learn Initiative 11Dialog Initiative 12Advocate Initiative 13Support Initiative 14Innovate Initiative 15Advocate Initiative 16Support Initiative 17 © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 130
  • 5. Determine resources needed Go through your initiatives and document what is needed and when. Group similar requirements together so that you can easily see what is needed. Lay out against when you plan to start each initiative, to provide a timeline for resources. Do this also in conjunction with a Social Readiness assessment to understand your existing capabilities. © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 131
  • Example: Staff Timeline Now – 6 6-12 12-18 18-24 24-30 30-36 Position Initiatives Supported months months months months months monthsSocial Strategist Governance: CoECommunity Manager Learn 1, Advocate 3, Support 3Researcher/ BI Analyst Learn 1, Learn 3, Innovate 2 Learn 2, Learn 4, Support 2,Listening Manager Innovate 1 Support 1, Support 2,Social Customer Lead Innovate 2Digital Influence/Advocacy Dialog 1, Dialog 2, Advocate 1,Manager Advocate 2Content Marketing Dialog 3, Dialog 4Manager © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 132
  • Example: Technology Timeline 90 - 6 6-12 12-18 18-24 24-30 30-36 Technology Initiative 90 days months months months months months monthsMonitoring Platform All Learn initiativesESN Employee engagementSMMS Content Marketing Support and InnovateCommunity Platform initiativesTraining Platform Employee engagementSocial CRM Support initiatives Market research,Analytics Platform competitive intelligenceInnovation Gauge Innovate initiativesAdvocacy Platform Advocate initiatives © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi & Altimeter. Proprietary and Confidential. 133
  • The Social Strategy Process Identify Social Objectives Create A Social Vision Develop Social Initiatives Craft A Coherent Strategy Roadmap Organize for Social Readiness © 2012. All rights reserved. VivaKi. Proprietary and Confidential. 134
  • Guidelines, Policies and Best Practices
  • Closing Remarks