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Towards a Collaborative Culture: Social Enterprise in Ireland
Towards a Collaborative Culture: Social Enterprise in Ireland
Towards a Collaborative Culture: Social Enterprise in Ireland
Towards a Collaborative Culture: Social Enterprise in Ireland
Towards a Collaborative Culture: Social Enterprise in Ireland
Towards a Collaborative Culture: Social Enterprise in Ireland
Towards a Collaborative Culture: Social Enterprise in Ireland
Towards a Collaborative Culture: Social Enterprise in Ireland
Towards a Collaborative Culture: Social Enterprise in Ireland
Towards a Collaborative Culture: Social Enterprise in Ireland
Towards a Collaborative Culture: Social Enterprise in Ireland
Towards a Collaborative Culture: Social Enterprise in Ireland
Towards a Collaborative Culture: Social Enterprise in Ireland
Towards a Collaborative Culture: Social Enterprise in Ireland
Towards a Collaborative Culture: Social Enterprise in Ireland
Towards a Collaborative Culture: Social Enterprise in Ireland
Towards a Collaborative Culture: Social Enterprise in Ireland
Towards a Collaborative Culture: Social Enterprise in Ireland
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Towards a Collaborative Culture: Social Enterprise in Ireland

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Presentation on the contribution of, opportunities and challenges for social enterprise in Ireland. Presented to WIN [West of Ireland Networking].

Presentation on the contribution of, opportunities and challenges for social enterprise in Ireland. Presented to WIN [West of Ireland Networking].

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  • 1. Social Enterprise in Ireland: Towards a Collaborative Culture Olwen Dawe Irish Business Intelligence www.olwendawe.com West of Ireland7th December Networking2012
  • 2. Social Enterprise in Ireland: Towards a Collaborative Culture A Short Introduction & Illustration of Benefits, Challenges & Opportunities West of Ireland7th December Networking2012
  • 3. Global Recession: Irish Impacts The Context• Banking crisis - toxic shock to Irish economy;• GDP slowed from 6.6% in 2007 to -2.3% in mid-2008;• Unemployment remains ‘unacceptably’ high however economy is on road to stabilisation [DJEI];• Policy shifts towards supporting self- employment, high-potential growth areas, including social enterprise. West of Ireland7th December Networking2012
  • 4. What is Social Enterprise?• “Just as entrepreneurs change the face of business, social entrepreneurs are the change agents for society, seizing overlooked opportunities by improving systems, inventing new approaches and creating sustainable solutions to transform society for the better. ...” Skoll Foundation• “Social enterprises are part of what is termed the Third Sector or Social Economy. The Third Sector is comprised of organisations that are independent of the State, but may receive funding from the State, and may also contribute to the delivery of public services. They have primarily social objectives and reinvest any surpluses they generate in pursuing these objectives.” ‘Exploring Social Enterprise’, A. Clarke & A. Eustace, Eustace Patterson Ltd. FINAL REPORT, September 2009• ‘that part of the economy, between the private and public sectors, which engages in economic activity in order to meet social objectives’. FÁS West of Ireland7th December Networking2012
  • 5. My Thoughts?Social entrepreneurs are:• Change-agents, driving change and adding value to their local economy with wider positive economic and social impacts;• Focused on making a difference and deliver a ‘triple bottom line’ – financial, social and economic;• Defined by experiential knowledge – and therefore are closer to the audiences to whom they can most support. West of Ireland7th December Networking2012
  • 6. General Observations: UK “Big Society” – UK• There are 62,000 social enterprises in the UK, employing approximately 800,000 people and contributing more than £24bn to the economy.• Peter Holbrook, chief executive of Social Enterprise UK (SEUK), the representative body, says new laws and funding, and the impetus given by austerity, will help to produce a £50bn sector.• “What we are creating in 2012 is a more fertile environment and 2013 should be good year for significant change,” West of Ireland7th December Networking2012
  • 7. General Observations: European Commission Recognition of Importance - Policy• Social economy enterprises represent: 2 million enterprises (i.e. 10% of all European businesses) and employ over 11 million paid employees (the equivalent of 6% of the working population of the EU)• Social economy entities are enterprises - in the majority micro, small and medium sized enterprises (SMEs) - and, as such, they are part of the Commissions enterprise policy aiming at promoting enterprises, in general and more specifically SMEs, independently of their business form.• The EU policy in this area aims at creating a favourable regulatory environment for social economy enterprises so that they grow and prosper alongside other enterprises. West of Ireland7th December Networking2012
  • 8. General Observations: Ireland• Ireland has a strong history of social economy organisations and collective action, notably such organisations as the GAA, the agricultural co-operative movement, and the credit union movement, the last being the world’s largest (per capita) financial co-operative. Although social enterprise arguably is under-developed in Ireland, relative to other countries communities and wider interests, such as the State.• The concept of social enterprise has gained attention in recent years and increasingly is seen as one viable response to the economic trauma Ireland has experienced. Social Enterprise in Ireland: A People’s Economy? Doyle & Lawlor, 2012 West of Ireland7th December Networking2012
  • 9. Ireland: The Reality• The concept of social enterprise has gained attention in recent years and increasingly is seen as one viable response to the economic trauma Ireland has experienced.• Social enterprise increasingly needs to be part of the way we do business. Social Enterprise in Ireland: A People’s Economy? Doyle & Lawlor, 2012 West of Ireland7th December Networking2012
  • 10. Tangible Benefits to the Economy• In general? – Contribution to local and regional / national economy through solutions for recognised needs; – Services and supports – offerings which make a difference to the community and the lives of those dwelling in it. West of Ireland7th December Networking2012
  • 11. Tangible Benefits to the Economy• Providing affordable services/products to communities 79%• Bringing people together 76%• Creating local jobs 75%• Providing goods/services previously not available locally 74%• Putting money into the local economy 56%• Buying from local suppliers 48%• Helping the environment 30% ‘Exploring Social Enterprise’, A. Clarke & A. Eustace, Eustace Patterson Ltd. FINAL REPORT, September 2009 West of Ireland7th December Networking2012
  • 12. Challenges for the Social Entrepreneur & Social Enterprise• In my experience... – Funding – Strategic planning / appropriate business support – Support access issues / bureaucracy – Governance – Sustainability – Other managerial issues / staffing West of Ireland7th December Networking2012
  • 13. Actual Challenges• Funding/Finance 69%• Sustainability 23%• Strategic Planning 6%• Premises/space 2% ‘Exploring Social Enterprise’, A. Clarke & A. Eustace, Eustace Patterson Ltd. FINAL REPORT, September 2009 West of Ireland7th December Networking2012
  • 14. Opportunities / Improvements• Policy direction and focus – meaningful and tailored• Enhanced Interconnectedness: Networks & Networking – Representation [Diversity]• Funding & Access to Finance – Clarity• National Recognition & Appropriate National Campaigns [2013] West of Ireland7th December Networking2012
  • 15. The Future? What’s Next…• Enhanced visibility of the positive impacts of social entrepreneurship;• National recognition – networks and representation;• European-funded projects [LEADER and E. Commission];• Collaborative-working – clusters and formal ‘alliance’ building [DJEI]. West of Ireland7th December Networking2012
  • 16. The Certainty? Social enterprise can and will play an instrumental role in economic and social development through: – Provision of much-needed [tailored and appropriate] supports to communities and groups; – Employment, services and collaborative gain to local, regional and national economies. IF policy and support is enhanced to recognise the needs and nuances of the sector. West of Ireland7th December Networking2012
  • 17. Locally & Nationally: Some Supports & Organisations of Note for Social Entrepreneurs West of Ireland7th December Networking2012
  • 18. Thank you for your time! Any questions? West of Ireland7th December Networking2012

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