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Human factors for medical devices -  Do it by design
 

Human factors for medical devices - Do it by design

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This presentation based on the AAMI HE75 gives an introduction about how to take care about human factors in the user interface and interaction for medical devices.

This presentation based on the AAMI HE75 gives an introduction about how to take care about human factors in the user interface and interaction for medical devices.

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    Human factors for medical devices -  Do it by design Human factors for medical devices - Do it by design Presentation Transcript

    • 01August 2013Oliver Schreck
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    • 01August 2013Oliver Schreck Organization of basic human skills and abilities
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    • 01August 2013Oliver Schreck Color choices with less then 2% misidentification rates
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    • 01August 2013Oliver Schreck Simple reaction time for various senses
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    • 01August 2013Oliver Schreck Example: Overview X-Ray: Equipment and movement
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    • 01August 2013Oliver Schreck Comprehensibility of some standardized symbols, AAMITIR 60878
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    • 01August 2013Oliver Schreck You can't tell the number of results and there is a scroll bar The number of results is clearly displayed.
    • 01August 2013Oliver Schreck Bad Example – Radio buttons are not appropriate when there are only two options Good Example – These yes/no questions have a better representation with checkboxes
    • 01August 2013Oliver Schreck This progress bar looks like it is stuck at 99%. Ideally the progress bar should be hidden when completed and replaced by a green tick
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    • 01August 2013Oliver Schreck Font design influences the ability to differentiate “1” and “7”
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    • 01August 2013Oliver Schreck f) Scrolling: Avoid using scrolling lists and slider bars. Difficult to slide a finger across flat surfaces and stop it on a precise spot. Buttons are generally easier to use than a slider for scrolling up and down.A slider can be a good design option to help the user move rapidly through a set of options.A slider also offers the advantage of indicating one’s place within a scrolling list.
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    • 01August 2013Oliver Schreck All popups are evil but this may be the most annoying one in history. How ironic that the popup is informing you that IE has blocked a popup.
    • 01August 2013Oliver Schreck Popup with the dimmed background is much more intuitive
    • 01August 2013Oliver Schreck Sample of medical workstations
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