Morse Road Design Study

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Here is the overall plan of what is now being completed along Morse Road in Columbus, Ohio. Want to be a part of this? You can check out this great home at www.tinyurl/1161ReedCircleDrive

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Morse Road Design Study

  1. 1. Morse Road Design Study City of Columbus Department of Trade and Development, Planning Office Northland Community Council and Northland Area Business Association with: Kinzelman Kline, Inc. LDR International Main Street Connections Parsons Transportation Group December, 2000
  2. 2. Morse Road Design Study Table of Contents Contents Acknowledgements ii Introduction 1 Inventory and Analysis 3 Function and Aesthetics of the Corridor 3 Strategic Assessment of the Corridor 7 Public Street Improvements 11 Proposed Morse Road Street Section 11 Access Management 12 Street Plans 15 Elements of the Streetscape 18 County Improvements 22 Preliminary Cost Estimates & Phasing 23 Opportunity Sites 25 Site 1: Former Sun TV Site 26 Site 2: Huntington Bank Site 27 Site 3: Nazarene Church Camp Site 28 Site 4: Arena Motors Site 28 Site 5: Vacant Property 29 Other Opportunity Sites 30 Outline Design Guidelines 31 Site Design 31 Landscape Design 33 Signage 34 Strategic Recommendations 39 Market Research 39 Suggested Use Strategies 39 Catalytic Projects 40 Funding Options 40 Plan Implementation and Enforcement 40 Other Suggestion 40 i
  3. 3. Morse Road Design Study Acknowledgements knowledgements City of Columbus Strawberry Farms Civic Association Morse Road Design Study Steering Michael B. Coleman, Mayor Tanager Woods Civic Association Committee: Trouville Manor Homeowners Association George Hadler, NABA Columbus City Council West Albany Civic Association Mark Rush, NABA Westerford Village Civic Association Matthew D. Habash (President) Andy Bukovinsky, NCC Western Creek Civic Association Richard W. Sensenbrenner (President, Pro-Tem) Woodstream East Civic Association Mark Bell, NCC Kevin L. Boyce Woodstream West Civic Association James Dean, The Richard E. Jacobs Group Jennette B. Bradley Doug Krieger, NABA Michael C. Mentel Northland Area Business Association: Scott Blyze, Limited Real Estate Maryellen O’Shaughnessy Steven Keller, President Tim Lucks, Franklin County Engineer’s Office Charleta B. Tavares Curtis McGuire, Vice President Robert J. Weiler Jr., Columbus Board of Realtors Beth Ann Chesnes, Treasurer Michael Reese, City of Columbus - Mayor’s Office Department of Trade and Development Greg Gerhard, Secretary Pete Cass, City of Columbus - Legislative Re- Mark Barbash, Director Members: search Office J. Patrick Grady, Deputy Director Autoville USA, Karl Rd. Dental Group, Big Brother Big Stephen R. McClary, City of Columbus - Planning Stephen R. McClary, Planning Administrator Sister Assoc., Bob Caldwell Chrysler-Plymouth, Bob Administrator Dick Ritchie, Neighborhood Planning Manager Caldwell Dodge Country, Bob Daniels Buick Co., Bill Lewis, City of Columbus - Traffic Engineering Suzanne Wingenfield, Senior Planner Buckeye Maytag, (C) 3 Solutions For Nonprofit, C & G Tammy Noble, Franklin County Development Investment Assoc., Checkcare Systems Of Columbus, Department Northland Community Council: Chesrown Oldsmobile-GMC-KIA, Cooperonline.Com, Steve Thompson, President Inc., Crown Hallmark Shop, Fair Trade Realty, Fifth Interview Participants Third Bank-Morse Rd, Fifth Third-Kroger, Forest Park Pamela Thomas, Vice-President The following individuals contributed to this docu- Veterinary Clinic, Gabby’s, Goodwill Columbus, Morse Chuck Wolfe, Secretary Road Family Dental Group, Gripping Solutions, Hadler ment through individual and group interviews: Rolla Wagner, Treasurer Companies, Jacinto W. Beard, D.D.S., Jamesong Arlene Shoemaker, Dorothy Teater, Dewey Stokes, Entertainment, The Kennel Club Of America, Krieger Guy Whorley, Tammy Noble, Dean Ringle, Tim Member Associations: Ford, Lamar Asset Mgmt & Realty, Linda C. Brown Lucks, John Bryner, Jim Jewell, Matt Habash, Beaumont Neighborhood Civic Association Blendon Woods Civic Association Cosmetics, Litech Lighting Mgmt. Services, Richard Sensenbrenner, Bill Bopp, George Hadler, L.J.T.K. Inc. - Subway#11805, Mail Boxes Etc., Mail Ron Barnes, Mike Green, Jim Hutchison, Jayne Brandywine Meadows Civic Association Boxes Etc - 161, Maize Morse Civic Assoc., Mark A. Knost, Bob Weiler, Steve Moluse, Barry Weigand, Chestnut Hill Civic Association Bell, Mark F. Taggart Co., Mobile Electronics, Monaco’s Bill Hoffman, Bob Lawler, Mike Reese, Mark Clinton Estates Civic Association Palace, National City Bank, Northand Community Cooper Ridge Civic Association Barbash, Pat Grady, Steve McClary, Mark Rush, Council, Northland Car Wash, Northland Chiropractic Creekridge Civic Association Doug Krieger, Jim Gill, Greg Gerhard, Dick Nourse, Center, Northland Joint Venture, Northland Dental, Devonshire Civic Association Connie Caldwell, Tim Doran, Jeff Farion, Suzanne Northland Mall, Northland Medical Pharmacy, Oakleaf Forest Park Civic Association Wingenfield, Tim Rollins, Linda Patterson, Steve Village, Office Depot, Ohio Plastic Surgeons, Orginals Friendship Village To Remember, Plumbers & Factory Supplies, Ralph Gladman, Columbus Apartment Association Little Turtle Residents Association Maize Morse Tri-Area Civic Association W. Smithers, Redleg’s Lumper Service, Remax members, Maryellen O’Shaughnessy, David Baker, Achievers, Rush Motors Sales Inc., Saint Francis Jeanette Bradley Minerva Park Community Association Desales H.S., Schoedinger Funeral Services, Northgate Civic Association St.Matthias Church, Steven C. Emrich, D.D.S., The Northland Area Business Association Steven L. Keller CPA Co., Northland Coin Laundry, This Northland Jaycees Week Comm. Newspaper, Trueman Club Hotel, Parkview Civic Association United Skates Of America, North YMCA. Preston Commons Homeowners Association ii
  4. 4. Morse Road Design Study Introduction Introduction The Morse Road corridor became a major retail improvements include pedestrian upgrades at all and residential center for Columbus in the 1960s intersections and the enhancement and definition and 1970s. Over time, competition in the retail, of the Northland Community gateways. office and residential markets throughout Columbus along with a decrease in investment in Opportunity Sites identify catalytic the corridor has diminished the vitality of this redevelopment projects that could be district. Recognizing the impact that this implemented at key sites along the corridor. deterioration was having on Columbus, and Outline Design Guidelines establish the design specifically, the Northland community, Columbus principles that will guide the development of City Council funded The Morse Road Market these key parcels. In addition, these standards Study and Redevelopment Strategy that was will guide the redevelopment of the rest of the completed in July of 1999. Using the general corridor as it changes over time. recommendations of this study as a foundation, the Morse Road Design Study establishes the Finally, Strategic Recommendations are made vision for physical change to the corridor. for implementing the overall plan. These recommendations include suggestions for This Study addresses five miles of the Morse additional market research, additional funding Road corridor from Interstate 71 on the west to options, establishment of a planned zoning Interstate 270 on the east. The corridor district, and the proposed structure of an Inventory and Analysis includes a thorough appropriate organizational entity that will guide evaluation of traffic and circulation, land uses, the future redevelopment of the corridor. pedestrian circulation and aesthetics. This information was gathered through data collection, field observations, and interviews with the community. Public meetings and one-on-one interviews with local business owners and community representatives revealed numerous issues and concerns regarding future redevelopment of the corridor. The recommendations of this plan are organized into four categories: Public Streetscape Improvements, Opportunity Sites, Outline Design Guidelines, and Strategic Recommendations. Public Streetscape Improvements address the enhancement of the public right-of-way, which includes: a landscaped median, and an upgraded edge treatment with curb and gutter, street trees, sidewalks and streetlights. These improvements will significantly improve the quality of the corridor by controlling vehicular access and defining a pedestrian environment. Other 1
  5. 5. Morse Road Design Study Inventory & Analysis Inventor ory Analy The Inventory of the existing condition of Morse Access and Circulation Road and the subsequent analysis which reveals the opportunities and constraints of the corridor are achieved through data collection, field observations, the previous observations of the Morse Road Market Study and Redevelopment Strategy, and numerous interviews with community members. The issues and concerns of the public were discussed at public meetings and through individual interviews with local business owners and community representatives. The corridor has consequently been evaluated Left turns across at least three from two different perspectives. First, the lanes of vehicular traffic occurs physical conditions that impact the functionality from most parcels along Morse and the aesthetics of the corridor are addressed. Road. In addition, short dis- Secondly, the current market issues and policies tances between curb cuts create that affect redevelopment along the corridor are unsafe conditions. addressed in the Strategic Assessment. Function and Aesthetics of the Corridor Some parking areas are not physically separated from the The following physical conditions represent issues service road or Morse Road. that could be addressed through streetscape This creates an unsafe condi- improvements and redevelopment to enhance the tion by allowing vehicles to functional and aesthetic qualities of the Morse enter the road or enter the site Road Corridor. at any location. Curb cuts close to intersections create unsafe conditions. This condition is common at most major intersections along Morse Road and is often found at gas stations that possess multiple points of access. Short stacking distances into parcels or at service roads creates congestion. 3
  6. 6. Morse Road Design Study Inventory & Analysis Inventor ory Analy Pedestrian Access and Amenities Aesthetics and Landscape No sidewalks currently exist along Morse Road. Most sites provide little or no Overhead utilities visually domi- interior landscaping. nate much of Morse Road. Service lines that cross Morse Road and leaning wooden utility poles with large cross arms are particularly distracting. Pedestrian access across Morse Road is difficult today. The wide expanse of pavement and the lack While the typical seven lane of pedestrian amenities at the cross section along Morse Road corners create an intimidating is necessary to continue to pedestrian experience. move vehicular traffic, the extremely wide cross section of pavement lacks visual interest and may encourage higher vehicular speeds. The lack of pedestrian side- walks makes it difficult to access the bus stops along the corridor. In additon, only six of Few parking areas are screened No street trees or additional the thirty-eight bus stop loca- with vegetation. landscaping exists to visually tions have shelters. unify the corridor. 4
  7. 7. Morse Road Design Study Inventory & Analysis Inventor ory Analy Lighting Signage A variety of sign shapes, sizes and heights can be found on Multiple signs on individual Morse Road parcels create visual clutter “Cobra head” style light fixtures currently light the majority of the Morse Road corridor. Sign height and size often do Billboards visually dominate the not relate to parcel size Morse Road landscape in some areas. New bronze light fixtures have recently been used between Sunbury Road and Trindel Way. Directional traffic signs should be sized appropriately 5
  8. 8. Morse Road Design Study Inventory & Analysis Inventor ory Analy Gateways Easton The Easton development area makes up the eastern end of the Morse Road corridor. Many of the functional and aesthetic issues that currently exist along Morse Road to the west are being addressed in this new development area through new site amenities and development standards. Easton possesses an identifiable image of its own with its distinctive blue light fixtures, traffic signs The Interstate 71 interchange, and traffic signals. Landscape plans for the including the on ramps and off Easton segment of Morse Road have been ramps are currently maintained completed and will be installed in the near future. at minimal levels. The western gateway to the Northland community (top) and the eastern gateway (bottom) currently do not announce the community or establish the appropriate image. 6
  9. 9. Morse Road Design Study Inventory & Analysis Inventor ory Analy Strategic Assessment of the the size of the trade area. Shopping districts that shopping centers with over 4.7 million square feet currently compete with Northland Mall and in the 3.5 mile radius trade area. The primary trade Corridor Northland corridor merchants include, at least to area experienced $1.5 billion in retail and personal some extent, City Center, Easton Town Center and service sales in 1998. Automotive dealers and A. Market Analysis its surrounding big box stores, the retail area on auto-related goods comprised one-third of these U.S. Route 23 north of I-270 that consists of big sales. The retail supply in the area was dominated box stores like Kohl’s and Wal-Mart, the Lennox by automotive and auto-related goods, music- The following represents insights and comments Town Center, the Sawmill Road retail corridor and related goods, and furniture and home-related into information found in the Morse Road Market the retail development at the Polaris Centers of goods. Study and Redevelopment Strategy that was Commerce. commissioned by the city of Columbus and Inflow/Outflow analysis indicates that an inflow to prepared by Wallace, Floyd and Associates. With the planned new fashion mall at Easton and the primary and combined trade areas currently the recent ground breaking for the new Polaris exists for all store types. The analysis shows that 1. Retail Town Center shopping mall, shopping patterns general merchandise, apparel, home furnishings, and trade area boundaries for the Morse Road building materials, and automotive stores in the Trade Area Boundaries corridor and especially Northland Mall are likely primary trade area have at least 50% net inflow to change dramatically over the next few years. of consumers from outside of the combined trade Although the Market Study and Redevelopment Announced anchor department stores for Easton area. Stategy indicates that various factors were consid- include Nordstrom and Lazarus. Easton’s high-end ered when determining the primary market area fashion focus is sufficiently different from Other Considerations (PMA) and secondary market area (SMA), the Northland’s target market which suggests that the PMA and SMA boundaries were determined to be two could successfully co-exist. However, with six Several retail trends are and will continue to perfect rings. The PMA had a radius of 2.3 miles announced department store anchors including impact Morse Road’s commercial corridor that from the Morse Road/Cleveland Avenue intersection Lazarus, Sears and JCPenney, the current anchor must be considered when determining the best and the SMA had a 3.5 mile radius. If factors such stores at Northland, Polaris will be a direct com- strategy to implement regarding residential and as natural and physical boundaries, the nature of petitor to Northland for at least a portion of its commercial development and redevelopment. existing retail and competing retail concentrations current trade area shoppers. These trends include: the consolidation of big box were taken into account, the result would be retailers, a renewed interest in urban markets, market areas defined as irregular shaped polygons, By taking existing significant competing centers developers’ increased interest in the “new urban- not concentric circles. of retail activity into consideration, it appears that ist” and neo-traditional approaches to develop- the secondary market area may in fact at present ment and design, the redevelopment of older Competition be larger that estimated. The large amount of malls, Internet usage’s potential impact on inflow dollars that occurs in the area also seems traditional in-store retail sales, and the rise of The Market Study and Redevelopment Strategy to indicate that the market area boundaries could retail/entertainment clusters. recognizes increased retail competition in the potentially be expanded. On the other hand, “regional market” for the Morse Road retailers. when proposed new competition is taken into Big Box Consolidation – Until recently, numerous However, the study does not specifically cite what consideration, it appears that the market area for retailers have competed in shopping goods regional shopping malls/districts compete with shopping goods may shrink significantly once categories such as pharmacy, hardware and Northland Mall and its surrounding retailers. The these new centers are opened. home improvement, office supplies, and home study does mention competitors that are in the electronics. Increasingly, these categories are trade area but makes no mention of other outlying Morse Road has a regional shopping mall, nine being dominated by two or three major players. regional shopping centers or districts that impact major strip shopping centers, and 17 other Retailers such as HQ and Builders Square have 7
  10. 10. Morse Road Design Study Inventory & Analysis Inventor ory Analy been pushed out of the market by Home Depot and new communities they are creating. These types housing in the area. There may also be sufficient Lowes, leaving large vacant stores. The drug store of projects are typically mixed-use, incorporating a demand to support new multi-family housing industry is now dominated by CVS, Rite Aid, and number of land-uses such as office, residential, carefully positioned between existing market-rate WalGreens that are springing up on every heavily and retail that complement and support one and luxury projects in the vicinity. Quality multi- traveled street corner attempting to gain a larger another. Other characteristics typical of these family housing for seniors may also be an area of market share. OfficeMax, Office Depot and developments include higher density and pedes- opportunity. Staples are dominating the office category. Best trian orientation. Buy and Circuit City are increasingly dominating the home electronics category. 2. Office B. Stakeholder Interviews Urban Retail Markets - Many big box retailers According to the Market Study and Redevelopment The design team had the opportunity to talk with a including Home Depot, Staples, CompUSA, Strategy, the office market in Columbus remains number of stakeholders that included representa- Office Max, and Wal*Mart are increasingly strong with low vacancies and high absorption tives from the Morse Road commercial district, the interested in returning to often under-served older rates. Downtown office vacancies were around 5% city of Columbus, and Franklin County. The goal of urban areas. As the number of new sites avail- in 1998. the interviews was to gain a more intimate knowl- able for development at the outer edges of edge of the issues that face property owners, metropolitan areas dwindles, these retailers are The Northeast sub-market contains approxi- merchants, and residents in the Morse Road beginning to test smaller neighborhood store mately 10% of the region’s Class A office space corridor and realize the potential strategies that concepts for continued growth in older markets. and 3% of the Class B space. The vacancy rate could be employed to address those issues. Home Depot has built four stores in New Jersey was 2.5% for Class A space in 1998 with esti- Interviewees were asked to define the most critical to test the viability of a new concept called mated net absorption of 362,000 square feet. issues facing the Columbus Metropolitan Area and Villager’s Hardware. Staples introduced a smaller Class B space had a vacancy rate of 6.4% with Morse Road corridor, and to identify the revitaliza- version of its store in Boston nearly 10 years ago, 76,000 square feet of net absorption. Office lease tion/redevelopment tools that could be utilized for called Staples Express. CompUSA is carefully rates for suburban space averaged $19.87 per its renewal. Below is a summary of the developing smaller stores in Texas. Office Max square foot, according to the Market Study and interviewees’ responses. has begun testing a smaller version of its store Redevelopment Strategy. that is named PDQ and Wal*Mart is testing a Respondents were in general agreement that the 40,000 square foot grocery store concept for The study describes what additional development Morse Road commercial corridor has and will neighborhood markets. The biggest challenges is currently occurring in the Columbus metropoli- continue to serve a critical role as the center of these chain retailers will be faced with is adapting tan area. New office development is occurring at economic activity in the Northland community their formats to the unique characteristics of Easton with a total of over 4 million square feet and, to a lesser extent, the broader region. individual neighborhoods and competing with planned. Current vacancies at Easton Oval total Northland Mall is recognized as the center and local retailers that often offer superior customer 3%. An additional 1.4 million square feet of office most important anchor of the corridor. The service and unique assortments. development is planned for the Business Campus concentration of major, manufacturer-affiliated at New Albany. auto dealers is also considered an anchor and New Urbanist and Neo-Traditional Development – In destination draw for the corridor. Most felt that an effort to counter the negative effects of sprawl 3. Housing the corridor remains strong at present but is and take advantage of Americans’ growing desire threatened by the challenges outlined below. for a more pedestrian scale and stronger sense of Although no study has been conducted recently There is a consensus that strong and collabora- community in their neighborhoods, some develop- regarding what types and amounts of housing tive action is needed quickly to prevent further ers are applying new urbanist or neo-traditional opportunity might exist in the vicinity of the deterioration and disinvestment that will otherwise principles in the layout, design and function of the corridor, there appears to be a lack of move-up ensue. 8
  11. 11. Morse Road Design Study Inventory & Analysis Inventor ory Analy Most critical challenges facing Columbus Metro- marketing studies, community policing, appropri- politan Area (in order of mention frequency) – ate zoning and development standards, develop- • sprawl/land-use patterns/sustainability ment incentives, streamlined approvals process, • lack of a comprehensive plan (city, county, political leadership/vision region) • Franklin County – infrastructure development • transportation/infrastructure (projected in- and maintenance, complementary zoning, code creases in congestion, maintenance of existing, enforcement, city/county collaboration regarding mass transit/rail) long range planning, annexation, water/sewer, etc. • workforce development/labor shortage • Foundations/Non-Profits – public amenities • schools/education (beautification, recreation, culture); support of local • downtown revitalization social service agencies and community non-profits • level and quality of city services • Columbus Urban Growth Corporation – land • housing (diversity, quality, low home ownership assembly and preparation, development catalyst, percentage) public/private partnership facilitation. • lack of effective public/private partnerships • Northland Community Council – community • political structure (at-large council) consensus building, leadership and advocacy; • tax structure (too low) business community collaboration; planning and design review Most critical challenges facing Morse Road • Northland Area Business Association – city and commercial corridor: community collaboration; critical role in represent- • appearance/image (property & infrastructure ing and promoting area business interests; input to maintenance, inconsistent signage, vacancy and cooperate with proposed zoning and code appearance, etc.) changes and enforcement; augment city services • adjacent multi-family neighborhoods (manage- with Special Improvement District or other coopera- ment, maintenance, crime) tive approach to such tasks as infrastructure • unfriendly to pedestrians (too wide, no side- maintenance, parking lot security, marketing, etc. walks, poor linkages to neighborhoods, speed of • Financial Institutions – community reinvestment, traffic, etc.) participation in creative approaches to financing • insufficient, reactive code enforcement redevelopment • current and potential competing centers of • COTA – convenient, attractive, affordable, retail activity (Easton, Polaris, US 23, City accessible public transportation along corridor Center) and between it, neighborhoods and regional • over-built commercial (vacancy appearance, destinations; rail development inappropriate uses, too many car dealers, etc.) • MORPC – regional transportation planning • safety perception • lack of Morse-Bethel connector • not enough parks Most appropriate role in renewal/redevelopment of older commercial corridors: • City of Columbus – infrastructure development and maintenance, code enforcement, planning/ 9
  12. 12. Morse Road Design Study Streetscape Impr tree pro Public Streetscape Improvements Many of the functional and aesthetic issues The primary benefit of such a median is the section adjacent to the street gutter. Other identified in the analysis phase of this study can ability to control vehicular movements along the amenities that will help visually unify the corridor be addressed with physical improvements to the corridor. In addition, the median diminishes the include groupings of street trees, upgraded utility public streetscape. The following enhancements visual impact of the extremely wide pavement poles, upgraded street lights and decorative will improve vehicular circulation, establish a safe section of Morse Road and may help reduce banners. and functional pedestrian environment and traffic speeds that are currently posted at 45 mph. improve the Northland Community image along The three existing lanes of traffic in each direc- its most highly visible corridor. tion should be maintained in order to accommo- date the existing traffic volume along Morse Proposed Morse Road Street Road. Section The edges of Morse Road will be improved to clearly define and separate the vehicular environ- The proposed Morse Road street section includes ment from the pedestrian environment. Curbs a variety of improvements that will create a safer and gutters will be installed to control storm water and more functional streetscape. A new land- drainage and continuous concrete sidewalks will scaped median will physically separate the be placed 8 feet behind the curb. A continuous 5- vehicular traffic moving in opposite directions. foot bike lane will be part of the standard street CURB & CURB & METAL GUTTER GUTTER UTILITY POLE EXISTING SERVICE ROAD OR PARKING LOT EXISTING SERVICE ROAD 5’ 11’ 11’ 11’ +/-16’ 11’ 11’ 11’ 5’ OR PARKING LOT RELOCATED DRAINAGE SWALE BIKE WEST WEST WEST LANDSCAPED EAST EAST EAST BIKE RELOCATED DRAINAGE SWALE DOUBLE ROW DECIDUOUS CANOPY TREES LANE BOUND BOUND BOUND MEDIAN BOUND BOUND BOUND LANE LANE LANE LANE LANE LANE LANE DOUBLE ROW DECIDUOUS CANOPY TREES STREET LIGHTS & BANNERS STREET LIGHTS & BANNERS NEW STORM DRAINAGE SYSTEM NEW STORM DRAINAGE SYSTEM 11
  13. 13. Morse Road Design Study Streetscape Impr tree pro Public Streetscape Improvements Access Management In order to address the variety of vehicular A new service road will be required in front of the access issues that were identified in the analysis Haimerl Center to provide segment of this study, a number of devices are access to a signalized proposed. These include the introduction of a intersection. A low wall may landscaped median, the minimizing of curb cuts be considered in front of the Center to define a courtyard and improvements to service road intersections. and help screen the view to the service road. The Median A continuous median that is placed in between each signalized intersection along Morse Road will prohibit left hand turning movements across three lanes of vehicular traffic. While this will create safer driving conditions, it will also limit the access to individual parcels to right in/right out movements. The inability to make left turns in to and out of most parcels will be accommodated by providing reasonable access for all parcels to a signalized intersection. This will require that the existing service roads be extended in some locations to achieve this access. Two such locations are illustrated below. In addition, u-turn movements will be permitted at selected loca- The introduction of a landscaped island will bring tions. These locations will be determined through organization to this area of uncontrolled parcel access just east of Almont Road. This collection of parcels is a more detailed traffic analysis. EXTEND SERVICE DRIVE currently under parked. Efforts should be made in the TO PROVIDE ACCESS Milano TO KARL ROAD redevelopment of this parking and access area to meet Florist or exceed the existing number of spaces. Consideration should be given to negotiating a shared access agreement with the owner of the under utilized parking lot at the northeast corner of Almont Road and Morse Road. A new circulation route for service vehicles should also be provided. A possible solution may be to provide access between the two buildings west of Milano Florist and continue the service route behind the florist to the retail center to the east. Haimerl Center 12
  14. 14. Morse Road Design Study Streetscape Impr tree pro Public Streetscape Improvements Parcel Access and Curb Cuts A maximum number of access points will be permitted based on parcel size. Shared access points will be encouraged between smaller parcels. Minimum distances will also be estab- lished between these access points and between access points and public street intersections. See CLOSE SERVICE DRIVE ACCESS the Outline Design Guidelines for more on Parcel Access and Curb Cuts. Service Road Intersections The intersections of service roads with public CLOSE SERVICE existing condition proposed improvement DRIVE ACCESS streets or major parcel access drives are very Increasing stacking distances at public street confusing and often dangerous locations. Lack of intersections and at entrances to private commercial adequate stacking distance for automobiles development will improve circulation and safety. The creates congestion and confusion. In the short All service road intersections should be evaluated in diagrams above illustrate a proposed improvement to term, efforts should be made to eliminate these regards to existing access and safety. The diagram the Northtowne Retail Centre that would significantly intersections, where possible. In other locations above suggests refinements to the Northtowne increase the stacking distance. where elimination is not practical, limiting certain Boulevard/Walford Street service road intersections that turning movements could improve the safety at would improve circulation and safety. those intersections. Some service road connections should be eliminated to maximize stacking distances and create safer intersections. This service road connection to Northtowne Boulevard is not necessary because existing access to the retail center and the restaurant outparcel is provided further away from the intersection. 13
  15. 15. Morse Road Design Study Streetscape Impr tree pro Public Streetscape Improvements 1 Typical service road providing access to multiple parcels along Morse Road. 2 Eliminate service road when redeveloped properties have direct access to the local north/ 3 Future redevelopment of larger parcels whould promote the complete elimination of service south street network. roads by providing access to the local north/ south street network and/or by establishing a new parallel street system. 14
  16. 16. Morse Road Design Study Streetscape Impr tree pro Public Streetscape Improvements Street Plans The following Street Plans are graphic depictions and subject to further review and refinement of the proposed streetscape concept. The intent during preliminary engineering. More detail on of these plans is to show the general design and the elements of the streetscape, intersection locations of the landscaped median and the treatments, gateways and the county improve- resulting modifications to curb cuts and service ments follow these plans. roads. All improvements shown are conceptual Interstate 71 to Maize Road EVANSWOOD DR. ABANDON SERVICE ROAD- ALLOW PRIVATE PROPERTY POTENTIAL TRAFFIC SIGNAL MODIFY INTO RI/RO TO REDUCE PAVEMENT TO BE STUDIED IN CONTEXT ELIMINATE CURB CUT SETBACK OF EXISTING SIGNALIZATION CURB CUT TIMING AND SEQUENCING TATE 71 INTERS CONSOLIDATE PEDESTRIAN MODIFY INTO RIGHT GLENMAWR AVE. INTO RI ONLY ACTIVATED SANDY LANE RD. CURB CUT MODIFY INTO RI/ IN ONLY CURB CUT TRAFFIC RO CURB CUT SIGNAL ELIMINATE ELIMINATE CURB CUTS CURB CUT Fairfield Inn Maize Road to Karl Road ALIGN CURB CUT WITH SOUTHSIDE RETAIL CENTER AND ESTABLISH SHARED ACCESS AGREEMENT WITH MODIFY INTO FAST FOOD RESTAURANT. RI/RO CURB CUT RI/LI/RO CURB CUTS . RI ONLY CURB CUT RD . RD FENCEWAY DR. NT PROVIDE ACCESS RO ONLY CURB CUT ZE O EXTEND SERVICE DRIVE ALIGN CURB CUT M TO ALMONT ROAD AL I MA TO PROVIDE ACCESS TO WITH INTERSECTION KARL ROAD ELIMINATE CURB CUT PROVIDE PLANTING ISLAND ELIMINATE TRANSITION 4 BETWEEN SREET AND CURB CUT ALLOW ONE RI/RO CURB CUT LANES TO 3 MODIFY INTO PARKING AREA AT THIS LOCATION MODIFY INTO ELIMINATE RI/RO CURB CUTS MODIFY INTO RI/LI/RO CURB CUT CURB CUT RI/RO CURB CUT MODIFY INTO RI/RO CURB CUT ELIMINATE EXISTING MODIFY INTO Haimerl MODIFY INTO MODIFY INTO Bank Col. Fire/ RI/RO CURB CUT Center RI/RO CURB CUT RI/RO CURB CUT One KARL RD. RIGHT TURN ONLY LANE P.D. Ascension ESTABLISH RI/RO PROVIDE SERVICE DRIVE TO Lutheran Church Sofa CURB CUT TRAFFIC SIGNAL AT ALMONT Express Whites Furniture Rhodes Furniture 15
  17. 17. Morse Road Design Study Streetscape Impr tree pro Public Streetscape Improvements Karl Road to Lemarie Court Krieger Ford Bob Caldwell ESTABLISH RI/ CLOSE SERVICE ELIMINATE RO CURB CUT DRIVE ACCESS ELIMINATE CURB CUTS MODIFY INTO RI/ CURB CUT ESTABLISH RI/RO MODIFY INTO RI/ ELIMINATE MODIFY INTO RI/ ELIMINATE RO CURB CUT CURB CUT CURB CUT RO CURB CUT CURB CUT RO CURB CUT ONE WAY WESTBOUND Col. Fire/P.D. KARL RD. Fountain Square Lane ELIMINATE CURB CUT FOLLOWING RELOCATION OF FIRE STATION. MODIFY INTO RI/ MEDIAN SHOULD NOT BE Sears Auto RO CURB CUT LEMARIE CT. CONSTRUCTED IN THIS LOCATION UNTIL FIRE STATION HAS RELOCATED. Lemarie Court to Cleveland Avenue Old Time Pottery Ron Rush Lincoln NORTHTOWNE BLVD. Mercury MODIFY ELIMINATE INTO RI/RO CURB CUT MODIFY MODIFY INTO RI/ LI/RO CURB CUT CURB CUT INTO RI/RO MODIFY CURB CUT INTO RI/RO CLOSE SERVICE CURB CUT DRIVE ACCESS ESTABLISH RIGHT ONLY MALIN ST. ALIGN CURB CLEVELAND AVE. TURN LANE WALFORD ST. CUTS MODIFY American INTO RI/RO Fitness CURB CUT Wharehouse LEMARIE CT. RITE RUG Rite Rug Huntington Operations Center 16
  18. 18. Morse Road Design Study Streetscape Impr tree pro Public Streetscape Improvements Cleveland Avenue to Alum Creek Nazarene Church Camp Krieger Dennis Jeep Pontiac Dennis AY Isuzu W DEL TRIN CREEK CHESFORD ROAD DUNBRIDGE STREET AD RR CLEVELAND AVENUE RO AIL LE NR ALUM DUNBRIDGE STREET VIL CO ER ED Abbey Lane ST ND Apartments WE DO Quality AN Northpointe Chevrolet AB Apartments Alum Creek to Interstate 270 ALUM CREEK UDF Limited Too 17
  19. 19. Morse Road Design Study Streetscape Impr tree pro Public Streetscape Improvements Elements of the Streetscape of the ground plane to simplify maintenance. Sidewalks Where left turn lanes reduce the median to a Standard concrete sidewalks will be 5’ wide and width of 4’ at intersections, the median should be placed 8’ behind the curb. Handicap accessible Landscaped Median treated with brick or concrete pavers to further curb ramps will be used at all access drives and In addition to the functional access management reinforce the unique identity of the corridor. public streets. Walks will connect with existing aspects of the median, the treatment of these walks at the crossing streets. spaces will help diminish the scale of the street Curb and Gutter and establish a unique image for the corridor. A new curb and gutter will divide the vehicular Bike Lanes The typical landscaped median will be 16’ in environment from the pedestrian environment 5’ wide asphalt bike lanes will be provided width. A rhythm of post and banners that alter- along Morse Road. New storm drainage includ- between the gutter and the inside vehicular traffic nate with upright groupings of trees will add visual ing catch basins and storm pipe will also be lane. The Morse Road corridor serves as a major interest without blocking views across the corri- required. A combination of the curb and gutter east-west connector in the larger regional dor. Low plantings of small shrubs or perennial and a smaller open drainage swale may still be bikeway network. These lanes will be clearly color will be planted at the base of these trees. required where old service roads exist. The marked with City of Columbus standard bikeway These plants should be particularly hardy and condition and capacity of the existing storm markings. These lanes should not follow the curb resistant to drought conditions and salt spray. drainage system will need to be further evaluated and gutter line where right turn only lanes exist Turf grass should be established on the majority at the time of final design and engineering. for automobiles. Rather, these lanes should continue as any other vehicular lane of traffic. Street Trees The placement of street trees along the edges of Morse Road will help visually unify the corridor and establish a more comfortable pedestrian environment. Tree specimens must be able to tolerate the harsh urban conditions of Morse Road relative to heat, drought and salt spray. Trees should be large growing, long-lived decidu- ous trees. The form of these trees should be upright as opposed to broad and spreading to minimize the amount of overhang into the street or into overhead utility lines. The canopy of the trees should be maintained at a height of 8’ to ensure views under the trees to fronting commer- cial properties. A staggered spacing of trees will create a visual baffle that will also provide views into sites. Trees should generally be planted in groupings of five or seven and allow breaks or windows into properties. While typical breaks between tree groupings will be 60’ to 120’, larger breaks of 120’ to 180’ will be permitted in front of car dealerships to allow views into their vehicular 18
  20. 20. Morse Road Design Study Streetscape Impr tree pro Public Streetscape Improvements display areas. Site distance requirements should that cross Morse Road. Poles should be painted to should the Northland community. This treat- be carefully considered in the placement of all bronze to match the standard street light pole ment should begin at the eastern and western street trees. color. All poles should be located behind the gateways to Northland. Banners should be hung sidewalk and street tree plantings. from street lights and from ornamental posts Utility Poles located within the landscaped median. A banner While the Morse Road Market Study and Rede- Street Lights program could be established that changes with velopment Strategy proposed the burial of above Continue the use of the standard City of Colum- the seasons or announces special annual events ground utilities, further research has found the bus street light and pole that has been used in the community. cost to be prohibitive. An existing city ordinance between Sunbury Road and Trindel Way. Break 910.06 should be further explored as an alterna- away banner arms should be specified as part of Traffic Signs tive means of cost effectively burying utilities these light poles. The collection of smaller items can add visual along Morse Road or along other city streets. A clutter along the corridor. Consistent treatment of possible aesthetic upgrade to the existing above Posts and Banners smaller elements such as traffic signage can help ground utilities is to replace the existing wood Banners will be used along the corridor to en- to visually unify the corridor. Bronze sign posts utility poles with metal poles along both sides of hance visual interest and reinforce an identity for and bronze sign backgrounds are recommended Morse Road. Poles along both sides will mini- the Northland community. As the Easton devel- for all traffic signs along the corridor. mize, if not totally eliminate, the number of lines opment has established its own clear identity, so A view looking west at Sandy Hill Lane shows how the impact of overhead utility lines will be diminished as a result of the streetscape enhancements. New bronze light fixtures Traffic signs can be have recently been used consistently treated along between Sunbury Road the corridor with bronze and Trindel Way (left). painted posts and Banners will be installed on backgrounds. The Easton street light poles and on development has ornamental posts located in implemented a similar the median (right). treatment in the “Easton blue” color. 19
  21. 21. Morse Road Design Study Streetscape Impr tree pro Public Streetscape Improvements Intersections Bus Stops Proposed All signalized intersections will receive broad, Bus stops along the corridor will be significantly improvements to an existing bus stop painted cross walks to alert drivers to the pedes- improved by providing safe and convenient located west of Almont trian crossing. Traffic signals will be hung from pedestrian access to the stops with the introduc- Road. bronze mast arms at all intersections. This will tion of concrete walks. Concrete pads will also be eliminate the amount of visual clutter at each installed to provide access to the buses that will intersection. Street names will be hung from stop along the curb. COTA is currently exploring these mast arms as well to aid in visual recogni- options for a new standard bus shelter. These tion of the crossing streets. Major intersections new shelters should be significantly more open or along Morse Road at Karl Road, Cleveland transparent than the existing shelters. This will Avenue and Westerville Road will receive addi- promote the sense of security with added visual tional amenities to reinforce their importance as surveillance. Over time, shelters should be major nodes along the corridor. Amenities installed at all of the bus stops along the corridor. include low masonry walls, specialty paving at the corners, and ornamental plantings. Proposed improvements to the intersection of Karl Road and Morse Road. 20
  22. 22. Morse Road Design Study Streetscape Impr tree pro Public Streetscape Improvements Gateways Special treatment should be given to the eastern ornamental lighting. “Northland” could be an- The east gateway to the Northland community and western gateways into the Northland commu- nounced with painted letters on the bridge or should be established just west of the Alum Creek nity. These thresholds represent unique opportu- perhaps on a separate sign that could be attached Bridge. A large painted area of asphalt that is not nities to establish an image for Morse Road and to the bridge structure. Since this gateway also currently used for vehicular traffic lanes could the Northland community. The Easton develop- represents the threshold into the Beechwold/ become a landscaped median. This median ment should maintain its own identity along the Clintonville neighborhood to the west, those would consist of the standard pattern of planting corridor by reinforcing its gateways at Interstate communities should be represented in any and posts with banners that will be common from 270 on the east end and at the intersection of design/redevelopment of this gateway. Interstate 71 to Cleveland Avenue to the west. Sunbury Road and Morse Road on the west end. The right-of-way of the Interstate 71 interchange The west gateway to the Northland community should also be improved. The infield areas begins at Indianola Avenue and includes the should be treated with a geometric planting of existing railroad bridges and the Interstate 71 large upright trees that are easily recognizable as overpass. In addition to the basic streetscape one travels at higher speeds along the highway. elements, special treatment should be given to Off ramps and on ramps could also be enhanced the side slopes and the railroad bridges. The with slope plantings, trees and increased mainte- bridges should be painted and possibly receive nance. West Gateway and the I-71 Interchange East Gateway at Alum Creek 21
  23. 23. Morse Road Design Study Streetscape Impr tree pro Public Streetscape Improvements County Improvements parcels along this segment. Some of the follow- Utility Poles - existing wood poles along the ing streetscape upgrades will be included as part south side of the road will be replaced with of the county’s widening project or will be imple- bronze metal poles which will be placed along Over one mile of the five mile Morse Road right - mented after the project is complete. both sides of the street to minimize utility line of-way is currently located within the jurisdiction crossings. of Franklin County and not in the city of Colum- Sidewalks - to be relocated from three feet to bus. This segment extends from Cleveland seven feet behind the curb where sufficient right- Intersection Upgrades - to match other Avenue on the west to Trindel Way on the east. of-way allows. signalized intersections along the corridor with The County currently has plans to widen this broad, painted crosswalks and bronze mast arms. segment of road to match the seven lane cross Street Trees - to be installed at 40’ on center in Specialty treatments should be provided at the section to the east at Easton and to the west of locations where the sidewalk has been relocated intersection of Westerville Road (State Route 3). Cleveland Avenue. Construction on this project is to seven feet behind the curb. This will require coordination with the Ohio scheduled to begin in April, 2001. Department of Transportation as they have Street Lights with Banner Arms - to match jurisdiction of this state route. In response to this study, the County has collabo- the city of Columbus standard street lights that rated with the city of Columbus to integrate the have been installed from Sunbury Road to Trindel Traffic Signs - to match the standard treatment recommendations of this plan into the widening Way. Revisions should be made to the light pole of bronze painted sign posts and backing with project. A landscaped median cannot be incorpo- specifications to include the appropriate banner reflective sign decals. rated into this project as a result of the complexi- arms. ties associated with access to the various smaller Road Section - Proposed County Road Widening In some locations, the existing right-of-way will not allow the sidewalk to be relocated to seven feet behind the curb. These parcels will conform over time as the sites are renovated or redeveloped. Road Section - with Proposed Streetscape Upgrades 22

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