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Monitoring of Toxin-Producing Cyanobacteria
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Monitoring of Toxin-Producing Cyanobacteria

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Monitoring of Toxin-Producing Cyanobacteria in Littoral Regions of the Muskingum River Watershed, Ohio. …

Monitoring of Toxin-Producing Cyanobacteria in Littoral Regions of the Muskingum River Watershed, Ohio.
Presented at the Ohio Academy of Sciences, 2012.

Published in Education , Technology , Business
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  • 1. Monitoring of Toxin-ProducingCyanobacteria in Littoral Regions of the Muskingum River Watershed, Ohio A.D. Minerovic1, K.C. Scotese1, J.R. Beaver1, R.D. Davic2, and D.M. Oleskiewicz2 1BSA Environmental Services, Inc. 2Ohio Lake Management Society
  • 2. The Muskingum River Watershed • Largest watershed in Ohio – Over 8,000 sq. mi. – 16 reservoirs • Ohio Lake Management Society – CLAM program2
  • 3. Ohio Level III Ecoregions Charles Mill Atwood Leesville Pleasant Hill Tappan Clendening Wills Creek Piedmont Seneca Eastern Corn Belt Plains Erie Drift Plain Western Allegheny Plateau3
  • 4. Percent Land Use FORESTED AGRICULTURAL OTHER 100 90 80 70 60 Percent 50 40 30 20 10 0 WESTERN ALLEGHENY PLATEAU ERIE DRIFT PLAIN4
  • 5. Project Objectives • Examine littoral phytoplankton communities in different ecoregions • Relationship between N-fixing cyanobacteria, land use patterns, and hydrologic data5
  • 6. Methods • Collected from littoral regions – July-October 2011 • 62 whole water samples – Phytoplankton – Algal toxins • Hydrologic Data • Data analysis – PRIMER 6 Seneca Lake algal bloom sample Photo courtesy of Heather Raymond, Ohio EPA6
  • 7. 7
  • 8. Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii • Capable of fixing nitrogen • Capable of Cylindrospermopsis raciborskii producing algal toxins • Forested reservoirs Tappan Lake, Cylindrospermopsis bloom Photo courtesy of Heather Raymond, Ohio EPA8
  • 9. R² = 0.71 Proportional Biovolume by Site 100% 250 90% 80% 200 Mean Water Residence Time (Days) Percent Biovolume 70% 60% 150 50% 40% 100 30% 20% 50 10% 0% 0 N-FIXING CYANO NON N-FIXING CYANO OTHER MEAN WRT9
  • 10. ELISA • Immunoassay sensitive to specific toxins • Different levels of detection and quantification –Microcystin –Cylindrospermopsin10
  • 11. Microcystin Results • n=62 Below Limit of Detection <0.10 ppb 7 Below Limit of Quantification <0.15 ppb 38 Quantifiable >0.15 ppb 17 • No samples >6.0 ppb (Ohio EPA Public Health Advisory Threshold)11
  • 12. Cylindrospermopsin Results • n=41 Below Limit of Detection <0.05 ppb 26 Below Limit of Quantification <0.10 ppb 13 Quantifiable >0.10 ppb 2 • No samples >5.0 ppb (Ohio EPA Public Health Advisory Threshold)12
  • 13. Conclusions • Results indicate a link between land use patterns, WRT, and phytoplankton community composition – Limited data, not contemporaneous • Littoral samples • Nutrient data collected at different times • Future studies13
  • 14. Acknowledgements • Muskingum Watershed Conservancy District • Ohio Lake Management Society Lake Keepers • US Army Corps of Engineers14