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IMRE NAGY
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IMRE NAGY

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OWTF 2012-2014

OWTF 2012-2014

Published in: Education, News & Politics
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  • 1. 7. June 1896 – 16. June 1958
  • 2.  Imre Nagy was born in Kaposvár  He dropped out of the secondary school because his father lost his job  He worked as a locksmith, and he was also employed in a lawyer’s office
  • 3.  During the World War I he fought on the Italian and the Russian fronts  In 1920 he joined the Hungarian Communist Party, and later he also became the member of the Russian Communist Party.
  • 4.  In 1921 he returned to Kaposvár where he actively participated in the local Social Democratic Party and Trade Union.  Imre Nagy was expelled from the party and became a founding member of the Socialist Workers’ Party of Hungary.  He was arrested several times and in 1928 he fled to Vienna, Austria.
  • 5.  In 1930 he emigrated with his family to Moscow  He became the editor in chief of Radio Kossuth broadcast from Tbilisi during the World War II. With his family in 1930
  • 6.  In 1944 he became the Minister of Agriculture of the Provisional Government, he implemented the land reform in 1945  In 1952 he was the Minister for Farm Deliveries then Deputy Prime Minister
  • 7.  Prime Minister on 4th July 1953  In 1954 he started political and economic reform, for example, higher wages, lower prices and quitting agricultural cooperatives
  • 8.  In 1955 he was expelled from all state and party offices  He was also excluded from the Communist Party  He lived in home guard  He strongly criticised the Stalinist regime, the personality cult and dictatorship
  • 9.  On 23 October 1956 the demonstrating mass in Budapest claimed Nagy’s appointment to be the head of government  He was accepted next day  On 28 October he called for a cease-fire  On 30 October he announced the multi-party system  On 1 November he announced Hungary’s neutrality and its withdrawal from the Warsaw Pact  He asked UN and the Security Council for help
  • 10.  On 4 November on Tito’s invitation Nagy and his colleagues with their families sought refuge at the Yugoslavian Embassy.   On 22 November Imre Nagy and his colleagues were kidnapped by the KGB and driven to Romania. This action was led by János Kádár (the Prime Minister of Hungary) and his administration.
  • 11.  In April 1957 Imre Nagy and his colleagues were arrested and transported to a jail in Budapest  Their families remained in Romania as hostages  On 21 December 1957 their political trial began  In the show trial Nagy denied the charges against him and maintained his belief that the revolution was a pure movement
  • 12.  He was sentenced to death on 15 July 1958 and refused to apply for clemency.  On 16 June 1958 at 5 am he was executed  His body was transported to the most distant section of the nearby cemetery in 1961.   He was buried face-down amongst the remains of criminals and zoo animals under the female name Piroska Borbíró. 
  • 13.  In 1989 he and other martyrs were exhumed, and a funeral ceremony was held on the Heroes’ Square in Budapest on 16 June  The Supreme Court declared him innocent, and in 1996 the Parliament passed a law to eternally engrave Imre Nagy’s name on the nation’s mind.  Imre Nagy remained faithful to his beliefs and to the country and the revolution until his death.  His figure has become an example of morality and a symbol of loyalty.

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