Data Center and System Optimization
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As presented by Michael Glas at Oracle Technology Network Architect Day in Toronto, April 21, 2011.

As presented by Michael Glas at Oracle Technology Network Architect Day in Toronto, April 21, 2011.

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Data Center and System Optimization Presentation Transcript

  • 1. OADP for IT OptimizationStage II: Data Center and Systems Optimization
  • 2. IT Optimization (ITO): Stage II Assumes Stage I prerequisites are complete ITO Stage I: Portfolio RationalizationArchitectureA hit t Vision Stage II: Data Center & System Optimization Strategic Business & ment ITO Alignm Stage III: Shared Services/ Cloud Computing Cl d C ti Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 2
  • 3. Stage II: Prerequites and Inputs• Prerequisites • ITO Architecture Vision Completed • Portfolio Rationalization completed • At least for the Application or Technology capabilities within scope. • This means Standard applications and technologies and interfaces have been selected. selected • This also means an integration platform in place and MDM required for handling information source/sinks needed for system migration/elimination• Inputs • Catalog of Business Capabilities including (for each capability) Capabilities, • Value to the Business Strategy/Goals (Hi or Low) • QoS requirements (Availability and performance) • Scalability requirements (xx growth within yy years) • M t i of Business Capabilities / O Matrix f B i C biliti Organizational units (O i ti l it (Operational M d l) ti l Model) • Matrix of Business Capabilities / Supporting Application software • Matrix of Applications / Supporting Technology capabilities/Assets • Catalog of Standardized Portfolio(Interfaces and Assets) Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 3
  • 4. Architecture Vision Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 4
  • 5. Data Center and Systems Optimization• Principles: • Abstraction, Clustering, IT as a Service Consolidation, Automation• Implications: • Flexibility Scalability Flexibility, • Increased Utilization Optimized IT • Cost Reduction and Efficiency Integration Layer Service Group A Service Group B Service Group C Shared Services Application Grid Application Grid Application Grid /Cloud /Cl d Data Grid Data Grid Data Grid Computing Security Layer Transitional Virtualized and Pt. to Pt. Integrations Consolidated SFAProduct SFA-Product product ERP SCM ERP- productMES- DB product Dev DB- Stage Inv LMS MGMT B2B B2B- Platform and Traditional SFA Stage SFA- Test Product ERP- Prod Stage MES- MES- Stage Prod B2B- Stage Dev Services SFAProduct product ERP SCM productMES- DB LMSInv DB- Product ERP- product Dev Stage MGMT 1 Client Stage FBT PAY G NTS Security Security Security Security TRDS Customs NTS A/c RRE IPS Penalty Refunds Data……. RBA Def Rationalized Integrate d A/C 1 Excise Payments IT CCD Compliance Staff CR EC I ADD AW A ELS Staff Business Phone DDDR TASS PKI CDCC CWMS GC I Bus. Intel IVR WOC Ref aterial m Portfolio BOA Remote TAX Client BANK Staff Staff AG ENTS Call Centres B EP Architectural Complexity Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 6. Data Center and System OptimizationGuiding Principles •Resource pools key to flexibility and Quality of Service(QoS) Pooled •Required across multiple layers •Drastically improved HW utilization. Flexibility and productivity utilization Resources R •Desktop virtualization improves IT productivity and reduces risk •Amortizes IT costs across larger part of the business Consolidation • Both requires and subsidizes higher quality people process and technology people, Enterprise p •Reduces complexity and risk •Improves, standardizes and simplifies regulatory compliance Improves Security •Requires higher quality people, process and technology Enterprise •Drives down costs, improves QoS and IT productivity •Enforces consistency and accountablity Management • Tailored to business needs, avoid overkill Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 6
  • 7. Clustering Across Tiers User Desktops Portals & Web Servers g y • Business Demands Agility – Deliver new resources quickly Application Servers – Adjust as requirements change Middleware Middl • Multiple Resources Must Be Aligned to Meet Service Levels Database / Info Mgmt – Performance and Availability Hardware / Platform • An Engineering Commitment Disk / Storage – Optimal flexibility and value Security Management Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 8. Consolidation At All Levels Data Centers Software Servers Storage Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 9. Enterprise Security Components Infrastructure Security •Hardware Accelerated Encryption •Secure Key Management and Storage •Strong Workload Isolation •Secure Service Delivery Platforms Database Security •Encryption and Masking •Privileged User Controls •Multi-Factor Authorization •Activity Monitoring and Audit •Secure Configuration Identity ManagementInformation •User and Role Management Infrastructure •Entitlements Management •Risk-Based Access Control Databases •Virtual Directories Applications Information Rights Content Management •Centralized document access control •Digital shredding •Document Activity Monitoring and Audit Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 10. Management of Clustered ResourcesIntegrated across stack • Abstracts system management into one virtualized console • Virtualize system images for rapid deployment • Management of virtualized servers • Deploy standard virtual machine images quickly and easily • Expedited provisioning and patching • Manage Quality of Service from end-user perspective • Automated diagnostics and tuning g g • Real-time and predictive monitoring • Comprehensive testing and validation Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 11. Aligning Automation with StandardizedProcesses – ITIL • Service Catalog Management • Service Level Management• Event Management • Supplier Management• Incident Management • Capacity Management• Request F lfillment Req est Fulfillment • Availability Management• Problem Management • IT Service Continuity• Access Management Management • Information Security Management • Transition Planning and Support • Change Management • Service Asset and • Service Strategy Configuration • Service Portfolio • Release and Deployment Management • Service Validation and • Financial Management Testing • Demand Management • Evaluation • Knowledge Management * Oracle Enterprise Manager Capabilities Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 12. IT Processes MaturityMove Up the Maturity Model 2% of companies 10% of companies 45% of companies 42% of companies 2% of companies Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 13. DeliverablesArchitecture Vision Future State IT Maturity Guiding Scope and entry Business B i Assessment Principles points Architecture• Drives the • By layers and • Guides the future • Scoping and requirements organization stages sequence of next• Provides the • Identifies the stages of IT g justification.. Or major gaps Optimization not Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 13
  • 14. Current State Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 14
  • 15. Common Problems with Data Centers… Basis of AssessmentMonolithic Applications BusVarying quality of servicePeer-to-peer integrationHardwired business processes Data Sales ERP Custom Warehouse Application pp Application ApplicationApplication specific dataMultiple software technologiesDedicated InfrastructureMultiple hardware technologies Enterprise Mainframe Server Cluster Big ServerConfigured for peak loads ServerLimited scalabilityAvailability < 99.x% A il bilit 99 %Many administration tools NAS/SAN Database DAS FileHuge Energy Consumption Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 16. Capture BaselineCurrent Capabilities Application / •Type, Scale, Utilization •Development, Test, Production p , , Technology T h l •QoS (Performance +Availability) • Skill levels, Certifications People • Si of organization Size f i ti • Effectiveness (Measured QoS vs Required) ( q ) Processes • Business Alignment Operational • Yearly license Support Costs • IT operations costs (FTE) Costs Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 16
  • 17. Maturity Models Use as appropriate to assess Current State• Clustering/Grid – see following slides g g• Enterprise Security – see following slides• Enterprise Management – see following slides• SOA (optional) Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 17
  • 18. Stages of Grid Maturity Level 5 Level 4 L l Level 3 Utility Level 2 Strategic Enterprise Level 1 Tactical T ti l Learning Cost effective Repeatable Real time scaling andStrategic Rollout of a Shared Automated configuration of HA for new Infrastructure Goals projects (TCO standard Virtual IT services platform Infrastructure focus) Release Combined use of C bi d f products and RAC and services Roll out RAC Enterprise Mgr immediatelyTactical Clusters for Maximize server to define policies Plans 1 Application per utilization and that are self RAC Cluster Applications that have specific specify SLAs that managing Value based business pains can be managed charging New & existing RAC for Mixed Grid for Dynamic Grid for UtilityExamples New Applications applications Workloads Workload Mgt Computing Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 19. Security Maturity Model Process & TechnologyCost, Effort, Risk high g 1 Reactive  2 Tactical   Ad hoc data and user management 3 Strategic   Centralized view of 4 Enterprise  E t i  Manual, identity;  User lifecycle labor- intensive single management  Secure information 5 Transparent audit source of  Standardized sharing truth data  Sustainable,  Inefficiencies  Real-time transparent , overhead,  Critical data protection auditing, security redundancy protections framework alerting, and practices enforced corrections Agility low high hi h Ad hoc Standardization Sustainable Security as Services Enable Attestation a Service Transformation Business Drivers: Efficiency, Cost Savings, Architecture Rationalization  Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 20. Enterprise Management Best PracticesMove Up the Maturity Model 2% of companies 10% of companies 45% of companies 42% of companies 2% of companies Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 21. Future State Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 21
  • 22. Guidance and Reference ModelsCLUSTERING(GRID) Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 22
  • 23. Grid – Part of a Larger Trend Service Oriented Architecture Grid Infrastructure ERP CRM Worldwide SCM Custom Web Virtualized Applications Virtualized Vi t li d Infrastructure Virtualized Information Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 24. Enterprise Grid Capabilities Service Oriented• Resource Pooling Applications• Resource Sharing• Workload Mgmt g• Provisioning• Central Monitoring Middleware• Automated Mgmt Clusters Database Clusters Virtualized Storage Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 25. Drivers for Grid• Continuous business change g• 24x7 global operations• Data explosion & Compliance • Keep more data online for longer • Provide access for BI, collaboration, regulatory reporting• Increased user populations • Intra-enterprise collaborative working • Collaboration with partners & suppliers • O li ( b b Online (web-based) customer/consumer servcies d) t / i• Unpredictable workloads Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 26. Customer Adoption of Grid• 63% say moving to Real-time Infrastructure (Grid) an imperative• Drivers • Increased agility (32%) • Increased QoS (30%) • Reduced costs (17%) Source: Gartner 2006•Grid Computing delivers: •Easy sharing and re-use of resources across entire grid •Predictable and dependable QoS across entire stack for all applications and data •Increased utilization, reduced excess capacity, reduced administrative burden Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 27. What Grid Delivers Traditional Grid Dedicated Resources  Pooled Resources Various HW Brands  Replicated Standard Numerous SW Configs  Standard SW Configs Slow to Provision Sl P i i  Provision S Shared PoolFailover Added Selectively  High Availability Built-in L t of Unused Capacity  C Lots f U dC it Capacity can b Re-assigned it be R i d Many Points of Mgmt  Centrally Managed Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 28. Grid/Virtualization Benefits Tangible Intangible • Increased efficient use of • Workloads can be ed Quantifie existing resources reallocated easily to avoid • Delay new HW purchases downtime d ti • Lower server HW and • IT assets can be support costs reallocated as needed • Virtual deployment time without physically moving reduces labor cost. them. • Fewer locations enables • Delay Data Center faster reaction to problems ified expansion • Fewer physical assets Non Quanti • Chargeback can be based enables more-mature on percentage of assets availability management used • Disaster recovery can be simplified. simplified N Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 28
  • 29. Guidance and Reference ModelsCONSOLIDATION Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 29
  • 30. Consolidation: Combining WorkloadsImprove System Utilization p y Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 31. Server Refresh and Consolidation Change Deployment Topology • Keep different workloads separate • Mix like workloads App 1 App 2 App 3 Database Database Database Data centric Data-centricApplications Applications Applications Application-centric Edge/Web Edge/Web Edge/Web Web-centric App 1 App 2 App 3 Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 32. Server Requirements for Consolidation• Scalable and high capacity servers • Provide compute capacity for many applications• Scalable operating system • Scaling for capacity• High RAS • Downtime not an option• “Virtualization” technologies g • To “stack” many applications• Legacy application support•UUpgradeable d bl Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 33. Benefits of Server Consolidation• Improved server utilization • Lower acquisition costs • Reduced service costs • Reduced power and coo g costs educed po e a d cooling• Improved capacity and response time • Newer and faster processors, interconnects, and I/O• Smaller foot print • Reduced data center infrastructure costs• Increased flexibility • Faster time to deployment of new applications Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 34. Next Generation of Clustering and ConsolidationPre-integrated at the Factory g yExample: Exadata Database Machine Flexible Capacity • Grid architecture for scale-out of database and storage servers • Smart Scan for offloading query processing to the storage layer • Smart Flash Cache storage for real-time random I/O • Data compression tuned for OLTP, Warehousing and Archival data • I fi ib d networking t support massive data transfers Infiniband t ki to t i d t t f Resource Sharing • ASM (Automatic Storage Management) shares Exadata storage across all databases • RAC (Real Application Clusters) shares large DBs across many nodes • IORM (I/O Resource Management) allocates I/O bandwidth based on database or application priorities • Instance Caging shares CPU for multiple databases within a node All the Power of the Oracle Database • Real Application Clusters, Backup/Recovery, Replication, Security, Partitioning, Large Objects, Enterprise Manager… Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 35. Pre-integrated at the Factory Example: Exalogic Elastic Cloud Extreme Java Mission Critical Integrated I t t d Performance Cloud System Improved Operational Cost p Time to Deploy up to Reduced Reduced 15- 15-35% 95% 10X Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.© 2010 Oracle Corporation - Confidential
  • 36. Oracle’s Elastic Cloud Foundation Application Grid, OS, Enterprise Manager and hardware pp , , p g WebLogic Server Coherence Ent terprise M JRockit and HotSpot Exalogic Elastic Cloud Software Manager Oracle Enterprise Linux or Solaris Exalogic Elastic Cloud Hardware EL X2-2 Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.© 2010 Oracle Corporation - Confidential
  • 37. How Does Your IT Impact Your Datacenter?• Costs, Demand and Capacity are Colliding... • Innovation in technology & businesses demands for compute capacity • Power and cooling costs surging insufficient capacity surging, • Limits to existing floor space and new real estate Watts per 800  Demand Square Foot  Power  Users  Costs  Services  Space  Access  Heat 120 40 2003 2005 Next Generation Data Center Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 38. Space, Power, Cooling and Connectivity At least one of these factors limits datacenters Power Space p Cooli ng Connectivity Cooling Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 39. Consolidation Benefits Tangible Intangible • Increase resource • Fewer physical locations utilization enables delay of enables reaction to problems new HW purchases • Fewer physical assets uantified • Lower server HW and enables more-mature support costs availability management; • Eliminate licensing/support • Disaster recovery can be Qu fees for redundant f f d d t simplified i lifi d capabilities • Fewer physical sites reduces fixed costs • Chargeback can be based antified on percentage of assets used Non Qua Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 39
  • 40. Customer Benefits from Consolidation Improving Data Center Efficiency• Major European Manufacturer • Achieves 50%-60% server utilization with SPARC mid-range servers• Major European Telco • A hi Achieves 55% 60% server utilization with SPARC mid-range 55%-60% tili ti ith id servers• US Financial Company • Consolidate up to 100 Oracle instances on SPARC mid-range servers• Benefits: • Less floor space • Lower maintenance • Reduced power p Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 41. <Insert Picture Here> United States Air Force. • 13:1 consolidation ratio • Reclaimed nearly 50% of datacenter floor• Server deployment time reduced by p y y space with eco-responsible servers 90% with Oracle VM SPARC • Better service levels• Cut datacenter power consumption • Lower cost by more than 25% Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 42. Guidance and Reference ModelsENTERPRISE SECURITY Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 42
  • 43. Enterprise Security Service-Oriented Service Oriented Security Identity Management Identity Directory Role M R l Management t Authentication A th ti ti Authorization A th i ti Federation F d tiAdministration Services Web Services Web Services Web Services Oracle Apps 3rd P t /C t Party/Custom A Apps Cloud S Cl d Service Providers i P id • Enable IDM functionality - FW • Rapid application security, • Discrete, easily consumable improved IT agility services • Security woven - applications Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. © 201
  • 44. Database Security Multi-Tenant Data Management Option 1 Option 2 Option 3 Shared (Virtualized) Shared Database Shared Schema Hardware RISK • P i il Privileged database user dd t b • Lost backups containing sensitive data or PII • Application exploits and by-pass • Regulatory infractions Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.© 2010 Oracle Corporation – Proprietary and Confidential
  • 45. Database Security Defense-In-Depth Encryption and Masking • Network Encryption • Secure Backup • Data Masking Access Control • Multi-Factor Access Control • Label Security Monitoring g • Audit Encryption and Masking • Configuration Management • Total Recall Access C t l A Control Monitoring User/Role Management User/Role Management • Identity Management Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.© 2010 Oracle Corporation – Proprietary and Confidential
  • 46. The Oracle-Sun Red Stack Integrated Security Policies and Controls g y V Third Party ISV Oracle Applications I Applications Applications R T Platform as a Service U Cloud Management Shared Services A Oracle Enterprise Manager L Integration: g Process Mgmt: g Security: y User Interaction: I SOA Suite BPM Suite Identity Mgmt WebCenter Configuration Mgmt Z Application Grid: WebLogic Server, Coherence, Tuxedo, JRockit Policies Connect to Controls Management A Lifecycle T Database Grid: Oracle Database RAC ASM Partitioning, Database, RAC, ASM, Partitioning I IMDB Cache, Active Data Guard, Database Security Application Performance Management O N Infrastructure as a Service Application Quality Management Oracle Solaris Operating Systems: Oracle Enterprise LinuxLinux Oracle Enterprise Oracle VM for SPARC (LDom) Solaris Containers Connect Oracle VM for x86 Policies to ControlsCenter Ops Servers Physical and Virtual Systems Management Storage g Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.© 2010 Oracle Corporation – Proprietary and Confidential
  • 47. Guidance and Reference ModelsENTERPRISE MANAGEMENT Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 47
  • 48. Impact of Ineffective IT Management Business IT Disconnect Business–ITBusiness Demand Traditional IT Response The application How satisfied was up 90% of are my users? time. We had 200How many orders databasedid we complete? transactions. My order is Our servers are stuck, up. We will look what’s going on? into it. Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 49. Business Driven Solution Business-DrivenBusiness Demand New IT Response Application Management User How satisfied 99% of users Experience are my users? were satisfied. Management BusinessHow many orders We completed Transactiondid we complete? 250 orders. Management There is an issue Th i i BusinessMy order is stuck, with a supplier’s Servicewhat’s going on? app. It has been Management escalated. Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 50. Business-Driven IT Management Integrated Business-Driven Integrated Systems Application Application-to-Disk Management Management Management and Support• Map business • Eliminate • Proactively identify metrics to IT events management silos and fix problems• Manage IT from • Create agile IT for • Maximize business business perspective dynamic business productivity Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 51. Comprehensive ManagementApplication Performance Management Lifecycle Management User Experience p Dynamic Resource Management y g Java, SOA, Transactions Patching Diagnostics, Tuning Provisioning Compliance Dashboards Functional/Load Testing Application Configuration Mgmt Real Application Testing Collection, Tracking, History Data Masking Configuration Management Application Quality Management Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 52. ITIL Best Practices1. Make the model work for you. ITIL is a framework of good practices. Use what helps, don’t use what doesn’t.2. Defining2 D fi i services and processes h two main goals that i d has i l h shouldn’t be forgotten: 1. Understand how the business or government entity delivers value and generates revenue or income. Prioritize the most critical services and income measure for continuous improvement. 2. Define, standardize and measure how IT serves the business and delivers value.3. Think as much as possible in terms of the service consumed by the ultimate end customer. It focuses attention on reaching overall business goals.4. Many IT organizations think of themselves as offering services. To avoid confusion, IT should communicate what they do in terms of ITIL processes. Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 53. ITIL Best Practices – cont.5. Have an IT and business owner for each business service.6. It is tempting to consider assets, systems and applications that internal users consume as services. Th i l i These might b i h be considered technical services if the use is truly internal only (such as HR). However, most employees exist to serve the end customer somehow and the ultimate service is the one the customer consumes, even if its delivered by an employee.7. When using RACI, use actual employee names with one or two backups if needed Titles organizations or groups won’t needed. Titles, won t drive the accountability and ownership needed.8. Never list more than one name for “approve” when using RACI. RACI Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 54. Management and Process Automation Benefits Tangible Intangible • Automation enables lower • Improved consistency of ed IT infrastructure labor administration performance support costs • Disaster recovery can be Quantifie simplified • Improved service level tified performance • Simplified systems Non Quant management administration N Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 54
  • 55. Summary of Deliverables Future State (Sample) Reference Principles Future State Gaps Models ArchitectureClustering Oracle TRM Pooled Resources Application Gap Diagrams and DB Grid Architecture Virtualization /Technology Matrix Matrix(Grid) App Grid Architecture Business driven QoS DB Grid Diagrams Max High Avail Arch App Grid Diagrams Sun VirtualizationConsolidation Exadata Arch and Group by usage type Exadata Diagrams Gap Diagrams and best practices Enhanced Resiliancy Workload mappings MatrixEnterprise Enterprise Security Defense in Depth IDM Diagrams Gap Diagrams and Architecture A hit t Separation of Duties S ti f D ti DB S Security Diagrams it Di Matrix M tiSecurityEnterprise OEM Architecture Measured KPI’s OEM diagrams Gap Diagrams and ITIL Automation ITIL process flows MatrixManagement Standard Processes Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 55
  • 56. Strategic Roadmap Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 56
  • 57. Strategic Roadmap Flow Inputs from various Sources & PhasesInputs from Capability • Stakeholder InputFSA Phase Gaps • Arch Vision • Business Case • Arch Principles p • EA Governance Models • EA Repository Analyze & PrioritizeStrategicRoadmap Transition TransitionPhase State State Roadmap Implementation Plan PROJECTS Phase I Phase II & WBS (2010) (2011) … Solutions & Initiatives PROJECT A (Work Packages of Capabilities & PROJECT B Architecture Building Blocks) PROJECT C Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 57
  • 58. Gaps Priority Matrix (Template) Secondary Primary Targets (O Overall Initiative ) ll I iti ti Targets ( Phase 1 ) 4 6 1. ( Recommendation ) ghest 2. ( Recommendation ) 1 12 7 Hig 3. 3 ( Recommendation ) 4. ( Recommendation ) 9 2 11 ( Phase 2 ) 5. ( Recommendation ) 5 6. ( Recommendation ) 7. ( Recommendation ) HighSavings 10 8 8. ( Recommendation ) 3 ( Phase 3 ) 9. ( Recommendation ) 10. ( Recommendation ) 11. ( Recommendation ) 12. ( Recommendation ) Med 1 Yr 2 Yrs 3+ Yrs Avg. Time to Value Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 58
  • 59. Create an Architecture Roadmap• Build Architecture Roadmap based on • Ri k t l Risk tolerance of customer f t • Ability to invest • Maturity level/skill level of staff • Don’t skip maturity levels Don t• Parallel and Interdependent Threads • Platform Clustering/Virtualization • Consolidation (Middleware, Databases, Servers, Storage, Data Centers) • Enterprise Security • Enterprise Management • Technology • PProcesses • Facilities Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 59
  • 60. ITO Architecture Roadmap (Sample) Current Optimized Dev/Test Initial Production Mission Critical State (CS)Business Reduced HW and Support costs • Reduced HW and SW costs for • Reduced costs , improved QoSValue for Dev/Test non-critical production systems and improved IT productivity for all Faster provisioning for Dev/Test • Improved IT productivity workloads on new architecture • Improved risk and complianceClustering Cluster Dev/Test • Failover enabled DB and App Grids • Highly Available and Scalable App Servers/Storage • Asynch Backup site and DB grids support Mission Simple DB and App Grids critical systems • Hot pluggable scalability • Active/Active on Backup sitesVirtualization Virtualized Dev/Test Servers • Production systems virtualized • Mature virtualization management, /Storage • HA enabled server virtualization monitoring and exception handlingConsolidation • Consolidate Dev/Test Consolidate small hetero workloads All workloads consolidated on pools workload on virtualized HW onto HW pools of servers New applications on App+DB GridsEnterprise • Centralized /virtual repository • Security Reporting • Mature auditingSecurity • Centralized Authentication/ • Initial Auditing • Mature SOD Roles • Additional levels of Data Security y • Highly sensitive data p g y protected both • Provisioning for Dev/Test by defense in depth and SOD • Initial Data Security • Mature compliance reporting • Initial reportingEnterprise • Initial management • Mature exception handling • Proactive capacity planningManagement g capabilities • Mature change management • Very mature end user based • Initial ITIL processes • Initial capacity planning availability and perf measures • Moderate Change management • Mature ITIL processes • Relevant ITIL processes begun Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 60
  • 61. Getting to Grid – A Process, not a Project Driven by Business Need yResources• Applications• Software • Monitoring• OS platform • Operations• HW/Storage • Infrastructure • Infrastructure • Policies• Mgmt Tools • Data • Workloads • SLA management Standardize Virtualize Consolidate Automate Benefits•F Fewer vendors d • Increased flexibility • L Lower cost of Ops • Real-time response t fO• Reduced complexity • Easier Mgmt • Reduced TCO • Reduced errors • Faster Provisioning • Higher QoS Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 62. Grid Roadmap Level 5 Level 4 L l Level 3 Utility Level 2 Strategic Enterprise Level 1 Tactical T ti l Learning Cost effective Repeatable Real time scaling andStrategic Rollout of a Shared Automated configuration of HA for new Infrastructure Goals projects (TCO standard Virtual IT services platform Infrastructure focus) Release Combined use of C bi d f products and RAC and services Roll out RAC Enterprise Mgr immediatelyTactical Clusters for Maximize server to define policies Plans 1 Application per utilization and that are self RAC Cluster Applications that have specific specify SLAs that managing Value based business pains can be managed charging New & existing RAC for Mixed Grid for Dynamic Grid for UtilityExamples New Applications applications Workloads Workload Mgt Computing Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 63. Security Roadmap(Sample)Cost, Effort, Risk high Transition  As Is   Standardize provisioning / workflow  Manual audit process Transition   Hard-coded, Link to  Phase I  application- li ti single  Application specific source of Portfolio authorization  Single truth source of Management Phase II s (PeopleSoft) truth /  Implement  Multiple  Abstract identities standardized  Support sources of identities data-centric data centric ongoing “truth” /  Defined roles into protections transformatio identities centralized,  Automated n / business  Slow, manual virtual attestation process re- access identity  Centralized engineering control repository entitlements Agility low high hi h  Standardize Reactive Tactical roles and Strate Enterpris Transpar entitlements gic efficient access control e ent sustainable attestation standardized development practices t d di d d l t ti Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 64. Enterprise ManagementStages of the Roadmap 2% of companies 10% of companies 45% of companies 42% of companies 2% of companies Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 65. EA Governance Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 65
  • 66. EA GovernanceIT Optimization AspectsFoundation laid • EA Committee already Established • LOB leaders+ IT leaders bought in by • Processes aligned with PMO processesRationalization • Buy in (or resistance) based on prior stage •AAssess if issues f i from prior stage, and if any adjustments i t d dj t t Stage in process needed • Operations has more central role, they own the key Focus on processes different • Dev/Test is largely of customer of IT services • LOB approval of migration to new architectureprocesses and • Establish key checkpoints/metrics to align expectaions of various IT and LOB units emphasis • Regular reviews with EA Steering Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 66
  • 67. Governance Environment Source: TOGAF Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 67
  • 68. Industry Frameworks for IT Governance Internal Control - Integrated Framework • Control Environment Corporate • Risk Assessment Governance • Information and Communications • Control Activities • Monitoring Business Business BusinessEA Governance IT Function Function Function FunctionIT Governance COBIT Best Practice Frameworks / ISO 9001:2000 ISO 17799 ITIL PMI/Prince2 Standards (QA) (Security) IT Governance is a key part of Corporate Governance, and the way to ensure IT activities are aligned, managed and measured to ensure business success Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 69. ITIL: IT Infrastructure Library The “de facto industry best practice for IT Service Management de-facto practice” • Non-proprietary and based upon proven practitioner experiences • Supports ISO 20000 – Formal, international standard for IT Service Management certification, based upon ITIL best practices • Gives a detailed description of important IT practices, with comprehensive checklists tasks checklists, tasks, procedures and responsibilities. • Operational & Tactical, not Strategic gITIL Knowledge O Overview: http://www.itil.org/en/vomkennen/itil/index.php // / / / / Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 70. ITIL: IT Infrastructure LibraryITIL is a comprehensive and consistent set of industry “bestpractices” for IT Service Management organized in anintegrated, process-based framework in order to add VALUE tocustomers• ITIL is the “de-facto industry best • ITIL contains 7 Core volumes: practice” for IT Service Management • The Business Perspective • Non-proprietary and based upon proven practitioner experiences • Planning to Implement Service Management • Supports ISO 20000 – Formal, international standard for IT Service • Information & Communications Management certification, based Technology (ICT) Infrastructure upon ITIL best practices Management • Gives a detailed description of • Applications Management important IT practices, with comprehensive checklists, tasks, • Security Management p ocedu es and espo s b t es procedures a d responsibilities. • Service Support • Operational & Tactical, not Strategic • Service Delivery ITIL Knowledge Overview: http://www.itil.org/en/vomkennen/itil/index.php g g Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 71. Responsible, Accountable, Consulted, Informed MatrixPurpose The RACI matrix is used define roles and responsibilities. In general, you match up roles and responsibilities with processes.How to Use • The RACI matrix is a useful tool when rolling out a new changethe Artifactth A tif t management program, or just uncovering the processes that t j t i th th t make your organization function and identifying the participation in those processes • The RACI matrix uses the following notation: • Responsible (R): owns the project/problem • Accountable (A): to whom “R” is accountable who must sign off (approve) on the work before it is effective. • Consulted (C): has information and/or capability necessary to complete the work. • Informed (I): must be notified of the results but need not be consulted.Audience • Executive Stakeholders • Line of Business Executives • IT Executives • IT Leads Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 72. EA Governance RACI Matrix ExampleArchitecture Implementation Governance Steering PMO EA Board Project Committee TeamsProvide Communication & Awarenessand of standards & assets I C A&R CConduct Coherence & ComplianceReviews I C A&R IProvide cross-projectCommunication and Guidance I A R IEscalation Resolution A&R C C IAllowance for Deviation andDispensation I A R IDefine Degree of EA teamengagement I R A CIdentify Resource Capability &Capacity I A&R C CUpdate Architecture Repository &Capture change requestsC t h t I C A R R Responsible A Accountable C Consulted Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. I Informed 72
  • 73. Business Case Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 73
  • 74. The Need for Cost Reduction > Discover Current State Constraints IT Management CIO / CTO•Have to cut costs from budget, but •Providing value for IT budget $$where? •75% of IT costs are not supporting 75% f t t ti•Want to consolidate servers to save new businessmoney •Must reduce costs but improve•Must automate processes p efficiencies at the same time •Can’t expand my data center •Legacy Apps don’t support changing business processes •Compliance exposure and focus on core revenue applications •Best value from IT investment •Enabling new business processes Line of Business/CXO Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 74
  • 75. The Need for Operational Efficiency > Discover Current State Constraints IT Management CIO / CTO•More data for longer = higher storage •Providing value for IT budget $$costs •Business growth > IT Budget growth B i th B d t th•Implementing virtualization = higher •Globalization driving 24x7 computingutilization, lower costs model•Raising p g productivity of IT staff y •Running out of power in the data center •Legacy Apps don’t support changing business processes •Creating information-based competitive advantage g g •Compliance exposure •Enabling new business processes Line of Business/CXO Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 75
  • 76. Business Value Discovery Matrix Developed during Roadmap OADP Phase p g p Financial Impact for Data Secondary Center and Systems Primary Targets Targets Optimization Simplification 4 6 1. Vendors Highest 2. Redundant Functionality 1 12 15 7 3. Standardization (e.g. OS) 4. Info. Lifecycle Mgmt 13 9 2 Consolidation 14 11 5. Databases 5 17 6. Applications 7. Data High avings 10 8 16 8. 9. Servers Test / Dev Environment 10. BackupSa 3 Virtualization 11. Middle Tier 12. Data Tier 13. Application Appliances Med 14. 14 Servers 15. Databases Automation 16. Management 1 Yr 2 Yrs 3+ Yrs 17. Backup Processes Avg. Time to Value Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 76
  • 77. Grid/Virtualization Benefits Tangible Intangible • Increased efficient use of • Workloads can be existing resources reallocated easily to avoid • Delay new HW purchases downtimeQuantified • Lower server HW and • IT assets can be support costs reallocated as needed • Virtual deployment time without physically moving reduces labor cost. them. • Fewer locations enables • Delay Data Center faster reaction to problems expansion i Non • Fewer physical assets • Chargeback can be basedQuantified enables more-mature on percentage of assets availability management used • Disaster recovery can be simplified. Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 78. Consolidation Benefits Tangible Intangible • Increase resource utilization • Fewer physical locations enables delay of new HW enables reaction to problems purchases • Fewer physical assetsQuantified • Lower server HW and enables more-mature support costs availability management; • Eli i t li Eliminate licensing/support i / t • Di Disaster recovery can b t be fees for redundant capabilities simplified • Fewer physical sites reduces fixed costs Non • Chargeback can be basedQuantified on percentage of assets used Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 79. Management and Process Automation Benefits Tangible Intangible • Automation enables lower • Improved consistency of IT infrastructure labor administration performance support costs • Disaster recovery can beQuantified simplified • Improved service level performance Non • Simplified systemsQuantified management administration Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 80. Enterprise Security Benefits Tangible Intangible • Lower FTE to manage • Reduced Complexity security systems reduces security and non- • Reduced time to provision compliance risksQuantified new users, systems • Reduced risk of external or internal sec rit breach security Non • Reduced risk of non-Quantified compliance Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 81. Risk Analysis / Risk Mitigation OverviewRisk Analysis: is the planning process where you identify the types, probability and severity of the risks that might happen on a projectRisk Mitigation: is the plan for what to do about the risks identified by Risk Analysis. This can include a combination of plans for:• Risk avoidance: minimize the potential for those risks to materialize• Mitigation: of the consequences: g q minimize the severity of risks if they do occur• Risk acceptance: be ready to deal with risks when they occur• Risk transfer: let someone else bear the risk for you, someone who can handle it better Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 82. Risk Mitigation Template Assess and Recommend Risk Management g Probability Potential of Business RecommendedRisk Category Risk Description Occurrence Impact Risk Mitigation ActionsOperational Service Disruption Low High Ensure proper planning for application migration – schedule off hours Slow Performance of new Low High Ensure that target application goes applications through full load/performance testing prior to implementationFinancial Loss of revenue due to new Med High Ensure Proper training on new application application complexity to all end-users Increased SW maintenance costs High Low Ensure that retired application support contracts are not renewedCompliance / Security for new application Low Med Ensure that security performs a full auditLegal of new system prior to implementation PII data being migrated to new High Low Ensure that new system meets PII system t compliance requirements li i tStrategic Loss of business functionally Med Med Ensure that end to end process testing is completed prior to implementation Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 83. Key Points to Remember “Best Practices” for Business Case Development pThe Business Case• Should be collaboratively developed during each stage of the architecture definition: hit t d fi iti  This will enable a progressive “soft close”  Ensures that the architecture definition hits the mark and on track• Is more than number crunching using an ROI model:  It is driven by the Value Proposition  It is a combination of financial as well as non-financial benefits non financial• Must relate to the customer decision culture:  The appropriate amount of rigor and formality will vary depending on the customers  “Just Enough, Just In Time” Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved.
  • 84. Stage II: Outputs1. Assessment of Current Operational Costs and Business Effectiveness2. Updated Principles3. Selected Reference Models4. Future State Architecture diagrams/models5. Catalog of Gaps6.6 Gap Priority Analysis7. Strategic Roadmap Diagram8. Implementation Plan9.9 EA G Governance Plan10. Business Case Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 84
  • 85. Next StepsCopyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 85
  • 86. IT Optimization (ITO): Stage III ITO Stage I: Portfolio RationalizationArchitectureA hit t Vision Stage II: Data Center & System Optimization Strategic Business & ment ITO Alignm Stage III: Shared Services/ Cloud Computing Cl d C ti Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 86
  • 87. Copyright ©2009 Oracle Corporation. All rights reserved. 87