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Lynn Tincher-Ladner Faculty Presentation

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  • 1. Ozarks Faculty Session - Your Technical role in becoming an Community Aspen Award Winning College Institution College Development Day October 9, 2012Lynn Tincher-Ladner, Ph.D.Chief Research and Effectiveness OfficerPhi Theta Kappa Honor Society
  • 2. The Community College FacultyMember of Tomorrow Champion of student success Researcher of student learning Master of instructional technology Facilitator of active learning Expert in content subject area Copyright Lynn Tincher-Ladner
  • 3. Cultivating Facultyas Researchers• Professional development• Support faculty inquiry• Faculty learning circles (online/developmental)• Directly involve faculty in student success analysis• Encourage experimental design research
  • 4. 21st Century Classroom and Faculty Spaces• Allow classrooms to easily transition between single and multi-focus modes and enable students and faculty to share information in new ways.• Support the range of activities that occur in a faculty office and a variety of work modes in a faculty neighborhood.• Set expectations for what an active learning environment looks like— learning is messy, things move.
  • 5. Learning Spaces ofTomorrow• Transformation. Allow classrooms to easily transition between single- and multi-focused modes and enable students and faculty to share information in new ways.• Active learning environments. In constructivist learning approaches, students are more engaged in the learning process and work closer with their peers. They spend up to three-quarters of their class time in group discussion.• Learning spaces all over campus. The first place that can better support learning is the hallway. Group conversations often migrate here because the classroom must be vacated for the next class
  • 6. Design Principles of the 21st CenturyLearning Spaces 20th Century Library• Design for multiple rhythms in Spacial the same classroom Social• Allow everyone to be seen and heard Informational• Take advantage of new media• Support the dynamic presentation of information 21st Century Library Spacial• Design for mentoring and apprenticeship informational• Design for temporary ownership of space Social
  • 7. Obstacles to Data-InformedDecision-Making• Heavy reporting requirements for colleges Feedback is Essential• Unclear roles between IR/IT • Recognition in• Data integrity President’s• Treating data as if it speaks for itself report/publication• Ignoring bad news data s• Communication skills of data people • Competitive internal grantsPlan to use data, not just collect it • Planning • Track students over time workshops/Data summits • Disaggregate cohort data • Conduct periodic administrative checkpoints
  • 8. Key Findings of Community College Survey ofStudent Engagement• Active and Collaborative Learning• Student Effort• Academic Challenge• Student-Faculty Interaction• Support for Learners
  • 9. Active and Collaborative LearningWhile the majority of students report that they often contribute to classdiscussions and work with other students in class, much smallernumbers report making class presentations and working with otherstudents outside of class or in their communities.• Nearly two-thirds (66%) of students often or very often ask questions or contribute to class discussions.• Over two-thirds (72%) have made a class presentation.• Most have worked with other students on projects during class with 48% reporting they have done so very often or often and 40% reporting they have done so at least sometimes.• Almost one quarter (24%) of respondents have very often or often worked with classmates outside of class to prepare class assignments.• Nearly three-quarters (72%) have never tutored or taught other students.• Over three-quarters (77%) have never participated in a community- based project as part of a regular course.
  • 10. Student EffortMost students report spending time preparing for their courses outside ofclass and utilizing school computer labs, but many also report coming toclass without completing reading or assignments and few takeadvantage of tutoring services.• Though half (51%) of students often or very often prepare two or more drafts of a paper before turning it in, over one-fifth (20%) never do.• Over half (63%) often or very often work on a paper or project that requires integrating ideas or information from various sources.• Thirty-four percent of students never come to class without completing readings or assignments, while 13% do so often or very often.• Nearly half (46%) rarely or never use peer or other tutoring resources.• Four in 10 (42%) sometimes or often use a skills lab.• Nearly two-thirds (63%) use a computer lab sometimes or often, with one-third (32%) using one often.• Nearly three in 10 (29%) students haven’t read any books for personal enjoyment or academic enrichment.
  • 11. Student-Faculty InteractionWhile the majority of students have communicated with instructors through e-mail and received prompt feedback from instructors on theirperformance, most do not report having meaningful communications withinstructors outside of the classroom.• Over half (61%) of students have used e-mail to communicate with an instructor often or very often, compared with only 9% of students that have never done so.• Half (50%) have discussed grades or assignments with an instructor often or very often, compared with only 9% of students that have never done so.• Over a quarter (28%) have talked about their career plans with an instructor or advisor often or very often, but 28% have never done so.• Over half (55%) have have discussed an idea from their readings or classes with an instructor outside of class at least sometimes, but 45% have never done so.• The majority of students report receiving prompt feedback from instructors on their performance, with only 8% reporting they have never received it.• Over two-thirds (69%) have never worked with instructors on activities other than coursework.
  • 12. Academic ChallengeMost students report using complex critical thinking skills in their coursework andworking hard to meet their instructors’ expectations, yet many are neutral as towhether their exams challenge them to do their best work.• Half (53%) of students often or very often work harder than they thought they could to meet an instructor’s standards or expectation.• Over two-thirds (69%) say their coursework puts quite a bit or very much emphasis on analyzing the basic elements of an idea, experience or theory.• The majority (62%) say their coursework puts quite a bit or very much emphasis on synthesizing and organizing ideas, information or experiences in new ways.• Half (54%) say their coursework puts quite a bit or very much emphasis on making judgments about the value or soundness of information, arguments or methods.• Over half (58%) say their coursework puts quite a bit or very much emphasis on applying theories or concepts to practical problems or in new situations.• The majority (64%) say their coursework puts quite a bit or very much emphasis on using information they have read or heard to perform a new skill.
  • 13. Support for LearnersThe majority of students feel that their colleges emphasize providing the supportthey need to help them succeed, yet smaller numbers use support services.Significant numbers also feel that their colleges do not offer support for non-academic, social and financial issues.• Nearly three-quarters (73%) of students say that their college puts quite a bit or very much emphasis on providing the support they need to help them succeed.• Half (51%) say that their college puts quite a bit or very much emphasis on encouraging contact among student from different economic, social, and racial or ethnic backgrounds.• Two-fifths (39%) say that their college puts very little emphasis on helping them cope with non-academic responsibilities.• Over one-quarter (27%) say that their college puts very little emphasis on providing the support they need to thrive socially.• Half (52%) say that their college puts quite a bit or very much emphasis on providing the financial support they need to afford their education, but nearly one-quarter (22%) say their college puts very little emphasis on this service.• Over half (59%) of students use academic advising services sometimes or often, and one-third (34%) rarely or never use them.
  • 14. Question Can persistence be taught, and if so, how?