Integrated Pest   Management        Jan McNeilan         Gail GredlerOSU Master Gardener™ Program
Integrated Pest Management• A strategy to prevent and suppress pests with  minimum impact on human health, the  environmen...
Principles of Integrated Pest        Management•   Monitor the plants•   Identify the pest organism•   Establish an accept...
Monitor plants• Look for damage on  a regular basis   – Different times of     the day   – Tools: hand lens,     traps, be...
Identify the pest organism• Is it a pest problem or  a problem caused by  a non-living factor  (drought, frost,  chemical ...
Know the pestOnce the pest isidentified, learnabout its life cycleand its naturalenemies.               Root weevil larvaR...
Learn the pest’s life cycle
Establish an acceptable             injury levelCommercial  example:Action threshold for  strawberry root  weevil in mint ...
Acceptable Injury LevelFor gardeners, this will differ between individuals.
Manage using all          available strategies•   Cultural•   Physical•   Biological•   Chemical     – Use the easiest, le...
Cultural Methods of Insect Control    Sound gardening practices
Resistant varieties
Crop rotation
Companion planting:      establishment of two or more plant    species in close proximity so that some               benef...
Intercropping with insectary plants
Encourage ecological diversity in the garden
Weeding and mulching
Sanitation
Physical Methods of Insect ControlBarriers:RowCoversCabbage maggot            Flea beetle
Barriers: Sticky barrier
Barriers: Sticky barrierRoot weevils                             Ants tending aphids
Barriers: Copper barrier                       Brown Garden Snail
Barriers: Plant cages and collars
Handpicking
Watering                          AphidsSpider mites
Pruning          Tent caterpillars
TrappingYellow sticky trap                            Trapping for fungus gnats
Trapping                            Apple maggot trapCodling mothpheromone trap
Trapping Slugs and Snails
Trapping Insects Indoors
VacuumingBoxelderBug                       Flea
Garden          symphylanTilling
Biological Methods of Insect              ControlBeneficial Organisms  – Pollinators  – Predators  – Parasitoids  – Microb...
PollinatorsEuropean Honey Bee
Bumblebee
Bumblebee
OrchardMason Bee
Syrphid flylarva
Predators
Yellow Jacket
Bald-faced Hornet
Prayingmantis
Green lacewing adult
Green               lacewing               eggsGreenlacewinglarva diningon acaterpillar
Snakefly
Two-spottedstinkbug
Minute pirate bug
Minute Pirate Bug Nymph
Big-eyed Bug
Assassin bug
Damsel Bug and Nymph
Ambush Bug
Lady beetle larva
Yum! Caterpillar for lunch!
Spider Mite Destroyer
Ground beetle
Rove Beetle
Soldier beetle
Predaceousspider mite
YellowViolet-green               Warblersswallow
Domestic Ducks
All bat species inOregon areinsectivores
Common Garter Snake                             Toad             © David Rosen                                    Pacific ...
Spiders
Garden Centipede
Millipede
Parasitoids
Braconid Wasp
Parasitoid wasp laying eggs in aphid
Aphidmummies
Tachinid fly
Tachinid fly and elm leaf beetle larvae
Encarsiaformosaparasitizingwhite fly
Trichogramma                   laying eggs in                   caterpillar eggsTrichogrammaadults emergingfrom caterpilla...
Many insects in the soil are beneficial
Springtail             Oribatid mites
Purchasing and Releasing       Beneficials
Enhancing habitat for beneficials• Provide diversity of plants• Provide insectary plants with small flowers• Provide adequ...
FennelBuckwheat                     Fiddleneck                     (Phacelia)
Beneficial microorganismsBacillus thuringiensis or Bt
B.t. kurstaki andcaterpillars
B.t. israelensis       and mosquitosDunk
B.t. israelensisand fungusgnats
B.t. san diego andelm leaf beetle
Beneficial nematodes
Infected root                weevil pupaInfected rootweevil adult
Horsehair Worm
•Very low mammalian toxicity• Soil must remain moist• Soil must be greater than 55 degrees F.
Chemical Methods of Insect Control:             Botanicals   • Derived from botanical sources   • Biodegrade rapidly   • W...
Botanical insecticide: Neem•   From seeds of the neem tree•   Broad spectrum against many pests•   Must be ingested to be ...
Horticultural Oil• Derived from petroleum, vegetable  or fish oil• Smothers insects and mites• Works best on soft-bodied i...
Insecticidal Soap• Contact insecticide smothers and  desiccates insect• Use against soft-bodied insects like aphids,  thri...
You cannot recommendhomemade solutions!
Sulfur• Use dust mask with  dust product• Broad spectrum  miticide and fungicide• Low mammalian  toxicity• Do not use with...
Pheromones• Used for mating  disruption• Useful for codling  moth  management in  orchards• Limited usefulness  in backyards
Synthetic Insecticides• Fewer available all the time• Widely varying toxicity• Always read and follow label  directions• D...
Other options:               Kaolin clay• Naturally occurring  mineral• Film acts as a  barrier between  pest and fruit• I...
Other options: Repellants
Disease Management
Right plant, right placeChoose plants well adapted to site
Rotate annuals
Select resistant varieties                          ‘Liberty’: Scab                          resistant‘Gravenstein’: Notsc...
Use disease-free plants and    disease-          seeds
Irrigate properly
Plant properly
Fertilize as needed
Don’t crowd plants
Control insects and weeds• Insects can vector diseases such as  plant viruses• Weeds can harbor diseases that  can be detr...
Sanitation     Remove diseased     plants and plant     parts
Dispose of crop refuse/compost
Sanitation  Prune out  diseased wood
Use mulches
Make and use compost
Use fungicides when necessary•   Copper•   Lime sulfur•   Sulfur•   Horticultural oil•   Potassium bicarbonate•   Neem oil
Weed ManagementIn Oregon, weeds grow like….well, weeds.
Mulching
Mulches•   Barkdust•   Wood chips•   Gravel or rock•   Cocoa or filbert shells•   Sawdust•   Newspaper or horticultural pa...
Hand weeding
Machine weeding
Spacing
Solarization
Cover cropping
Barriers
Herbicides• Conventional herbicides• Herbicidal soap• Vinegar• Corn gluten meal
Biological control         Tansy flea beetle     Cinnabar moth larvae feeding     on tansy ragwort
Avoid invasive plantsButterfly bush                                 English ivy                 Wild Clematis
Principles of Integrated Pest   Management - Review•   Monitor the plants•   Identify the pest organism•   Establish an ac...
Choose a Treatment Strategy• Use easiest, least disruptive, least  expensive, least toxic first• Read the label, read the ...
Our IPM Mission• Oregon State University Extension Service  encourages sustainable gardening practices.  Problems are iden...
Integrated Pest  Management      Jan McNeilan       Gail GredlerOSU Master Gardener Program
Soldierfly
Pseudoscorpion
Dragonfly
Ichneumon Wasp
Carpenter Ant
Banded Alder Borer
European Earwig
Cooley Spruce Gall
Oak Leaf Gall
Wild Rose Gall
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Integrated Pest Management
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Integrated Pest Management

2,483

Published on

4 Comments
2 Likes
Statistics
Notes
No Downloads
Views
Total Views
2,483
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
205
Comments
4
Likes
2
Embeds 0
No embeds

No notes for slide

Integrated Pest Management

  1. 1. Integrated Pest Management Jan McNeilan Gail GredlerOSU Master Gardener™ Program
  2. 2. Integrated Pest Management• A strategy to prevent and suppress pests with minimum impact on human health, the environment and non-target organisms.• Decision-making process that uses regular monitoring to decide if and when treatments are needed to control a pest, then uses a variety of tactics to keep pest numbers low.
  3. 3. Principles of Integrated Pest Management• Monitor the plants• Identify the pest organism• Establish an acceptable injury level• Manage using all available strategies
  4. 4. Monitor plants• Look for damage on a regular basis – Different times of the day – Tools: hand lens, traps, beat sheets – Collect samples of damage• Keep a record of your observations
  5. 5. Identify the pest organism• Is it a pest problem or a problem caused by a non-living factor (drought, frost, chemical damage, etc.)?• Is the pest an insect, disease, weed, etc.?
  6. 6. Know the pestOnce the pest isidentified, learnabout its life cycleand its naturalenemies. Root weevil larvaRoot weevil pupa Root weevil adult
  7. 7. Learn the pest’s life cycle
  8. 8. Establish an acceptable injury levelCommercial example:Action threshold for strawberry root weevil in mint = .92 weevil larvae/square foot
  9. 9. Acceptable Injury LevelFor gardeners, this will differ between individuals.
  10. 10. Manage using all available strategies• Cultural• Physical• Biological• Chemical – Use the easiest, least expensive, least disruptive and least toxic ones first
  11. 11. Cultural Methods of Insect Control Sound gardening practices
  12. 12. Resistant varieties
  13. 13. Crop rotation
  14. 14. Companion planting: establishment of two or more plant species in close proximity so that some benefit is derived• Trap cropping• Biochemical pest suppression• Spatial interactions• Beneficial habitats• Security through diversity
  15. 15. Intercropping with insectary plants
  16. 16. Encourage ecological diversity in the garden
  17. 17. Weeding and mulching
  18. 18. Sanitation
  19. 19. Physical Methods of Insect ControlBarriers:RowCoversCabbage maggot Flea beetle
  20. 20. Barriers: Sticky barrier
  21. 21. Barriers: Sticky barrierRoot weevils Ants tending aphids
  22. 22. Barriers: Copper barrier Brown Garden Snail
  23. 23. Barriers: Plant cages and collars
  24. 24. Handpicking
  25. 25. Watering AphidsSpider mites
  26. 26. Pruning Tent caterpillars
  27. 27. TrappingYellow sticky trap Trapping for fungus gnats
  28. 28. Trapping Apple maggot trapCodling mothpheromone trap
  29. 29. Trapping Slugs and Snails
  30. 30. Trapping Insects Indoors
  31. 31. VacuumingBoxelderBug Flea
  32. 32. Garden symphylanTilling
  33. 33. Biological Methods of Insect ControlBeneficial Organisms – Pollinators – Predators – Parasitoids – Microbials • Bt • Beneficial nematodes
  34. 34. PollinatorsEuropean Honey Bee
  35. 35. Bumblebee
  36. 36. Bumblebee
  37. 37. OrchardMason Bee
  38. 38. Syrphid flylarva
  39. 39. Predators
  40. 40. Yellow Jacket
  41. 41. Bald-faced Hornet
  42. 42. Prayingmantis
  43. 43. Green lacewing adult
  44. 44. Green lacewing eggsGreenlacewinglarva diningon acaterpillar
  45. 45. Snakefly
  46. 46. Two-spottedstinkbug
  47. 47. Minute pirate bug
  48. 48. Minute Pirate Bug Nymph
  49. 49. Big-eyed Bug
  50. 50. Assassin bug
  51. 51. Damsel Bug and Nymph
  52. 52. Ambush Bug
  53. 53. Lady beetle larva
  54. 54. Yum! Caterpillar for lunch!
  55. 55. Spider Mite Destroyer
  56. 56. Ground beetle
  57. 57. Rove Beetle
  58. 58. Soldier beetle
  59. 59. Predaceousspider mite
  60. 60. YellowViolet-green Warblersswallow
  61. 61. Domestic Ducks
  62. 62. All bat species inOregon areinsectivores
  63. 63. Common Garter Snake Toad © David Rosen Pacific Chorus Frog © David Rosen
  64. 64. Spiders
  65. 65. Garden Centipede
  66. 66. Millipede
  67. 67. Parasitoids
  68. 68. Braconid Wasp
  69. 69. Parasitoid wasp laying eggs in aphid
  70. 70. Aphidmummies
  71. 71. Tachinid fly
  72. 72. Tachinid fly and elm leaf beetle larvae
  73. 73. Encarsiaformosaparasitizingwhite fly
  74. 74. Trichogramma laying eggs in caterpillar eggsTrichogrammaadults emergingfrom caterpillareggs
  75. 75. Many insects in the soil are beneficial
  76. 76. Springtail Oribatid mites
  77. 77. Purchasing and Releasing Beneficials
  78. 78. Enhancing habitat for beneficials• Provide diversity of plants• Provide insectary plants with small flowers• Provide adequate water
  79. 79. FennelBuckwheat Fiddleneck (Phacelia)
  80. 80. Beneficial microorganismsBacillus thuringiensis or Bt
  81. 81. B.t. kurstaki andcaterpillars
  82. 82. B.t. israelensis and mosquitosDunk
  83. 83. B.t. israelensisand fungusgnats
  84. 84. B.t. san diego andelm leaf beetle
  85. 85. Beneficial nematodes
  86. 86. Infected root weevil pupaInfected rootweevil adult
  87. 87. Horsehair Worm
  88. 88. •Very low mammalian toxicity• Soil must remain moist• Soil must be greater than 55 degrees F.
  89. 89. Chemical Methods of Insect Control: Botanicals • Derived from botanical sources • Biodegrade rapidly • Widely varying levels of toxicity
  90. 90. Botanical insecticide: Neem• From seeds of the neem tree• Broad spectrum against many pests• Must be ingested to be toxic• Low mammalian toxicity• May require repeat applications
  91. 91. Horticultural Oil• Derived from petroleum, vegetable or fish oil• Smothers insects and mites• Works best on soft-bodied insects• Low mammalian toxicity• Avoid hottest part of day• Avoid drought-stressed plants• Use commercial products rather than homemade
  92. 92. Insecticidal Soap• Contact insecticide smothers and desiccates insect• Use against soft-bodied insects like aphids, thrips, whitefly, and mites• Low mammalian toxicity• Requires excellent coverage, repeat applications• Biodegrades rapidly• Effective only until it dries
  93. 93. You cannot recommendhomemade solutions!
  94. 94. Sulfur• Use dust mask with dust product• Broad spectrum miticide and fungicide• Low mammalian toxicity• Do not use within two weeks of an oil spray• Some plants sensitive to sulfur
  95. 95. Pheromones• Used for mating disruption• Useful for codling moth management in orchards• Limited usefulness in backyards
  96. 96. Synthetic Insecticides• Fewer available all the time• Widely varying toxicity• Always read and follow label directions• Dispose of properly
  97. 97. Other options: Kaolin clay• Naturally occurring mineral• Film acts as a barrier between pest and fruit• Irritates and repels insect feeding and egg- laying
  98. 98. Other options: Repellants
  99. 99. Disease Management
  100. 100. Right plant, right placeChoose plants well adapted to site
  101. 101. Rotate annuals
  102. 102. Select resistant varieties ‘Liberty’: Scab resistant‘Gravenstein’: Notscab resistant
  103. 103. Use disease-free plants and disease- seeds
  104. 104. Irrigate properly
  105. 105. Plant properly
  106. 106. Fertilize as needed
  107. 107. Don’t crowd plants
  108. 108. Control insects and weeds• Insects can vector diseases such as plant viruses• Weeds can harbor diseases that can be detrimental to desirable plants
  109. 109. Sanitation Remove diseased plants and plant parts
  110. 110. Dispose of crop refuse/compost
  111. 111. Sanitation Prune out diseased wood
  112. 112. Use mulches
  113. 113. Make and use compost
  114. 114. Use fungicides when necessary• Copper• Lime sulfur• Sulfur• Horticultural oil• Potassium bicarbonate• Neem oil
  115. 115. Weed ManagementIn Oregon, weeds grow like….well, weeds.
  116. 116. Mulching
  117. 117. Mulches• Barkdust• Wood chips• Gravel or rock• Cocoa or filbert shells• Sawdust• Newspaper or horticultural paper• Woven fabrics• Plastic
  118. 118. Hand weeding
  119. 119. Machine weeding
  120. 120. Spacing
  121. 121. Solarization
  122. 122. Cover cropping
  123. 123. Barriers
  124. 124. Herbicides• Conventional herbicides• Herbicidal soap• Vinegar• Corn gluten meal
  125. 125. Biological control Tansy flea beetle Cinnabar moth larvae feeding on tansy ragwort
  126. 126. Avoid invasive plantsButterfly bush English ivy Wild Clematis
  127. 127. Principles of Integrated Pest Management - Review• Monitor the plants• Identify the pest organism• Establish an acceptable injury level• Manage using all available strategies
  128. 128. Choose a Treatment Strategy• Use easiest, least disruptive, least expensive, least toxic first• Read the label, read the label, read the label• If you decide to use any kind of an pesticide, spot treat only and wear protective clothing when applying
  129. 129. Our IPM Mission• Oregon State University Extension Service encourages sustainable gardening practices. Problems are identified and monitored before acting. Gardeners are encouraged to consider cultural controls; then physical, biological, and chemical controls (which include insecticidal soaps, horticultural oils, botanical insecticides, organic and synthetic pesticides). Least toxic approach is always considered first.
  130. 130. Integrated Pest Management Jan McNeilan Gail GredlerOSU Master Gardener Program
  131. 131. Soldierfly
  132. 132. Pseudoscorpion
  133. 133. Dragonfly
  134. 134. Ichneumon Wasp
  135. 135. Carpenter Ant
  136. 136. Banded Alder Borer
  137. 137. European Earwig
  138. 138. Cooley Spruce Gall
  139. 139. Oak Leaf Gall
  140. 140. Wild Rose Gall
  1. A particular slide catching your eye?

    Clipping is a handy way to collect important slides you want to go back to later.

×