Sentence Fragments

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Sentence fragments. Are bad. So bad. Would never write them.

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Sentence Fragments

  1. 1. Sentence Fragments<br />Like a sentence. Not, though. Don’t make sense. Sentence missing. Something.<br />
  2. 2. What is a fragment?<br />A fragment really wants to be a sentence, but it’s missing something. Typically it is missing a subject (noun) or verb. Really, it’s almost a sentence. Sometimes you even have a pretty good idea what the fragment is trying to say. If it’s so close to being a sentence, then what’s the big deal?<br />Well, the following pictures demonstrate other “close but not quite” situations. You tell me if it matters. <br />
  3. 3. Close But Not Quite<br />
  4. 4. Close But Not Quite<br />
  5. 5. Close But Not Quite<br />
  6. 6. Close But Not Quite<br />
  7. 7. Close But Not Quite<br />
  8. 8. Close But Not Quite<br />
  9. 9. Back to Fragments<br />Like those situations, a sentence fragment tries to convey a message but ultimately fails.<br />Examples:<br />Because of the rain. (What happened?)<br />Saw the moon! (Who saw it?)<br />Without her mom? (Huh?)<br />
  10. 10. Fragments<br />A sentence needs to be independent. The sentence can’t depend on the surrounding sentences to explain what it means.<br />Example:<br />Martha had to grab her umbrella before she ran to her bus top. Because of the rain.<br />Without the first sentence, the fragment doesn’t make sense. It isn’t independent.<br />
  11. 11. To Conclude<br />A sentence is independent and contains both a subject and a verb.<br />Just in case you missed it, go back to the title slide and have a good laugh.<br />

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