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Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013
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Methamphetamine: updated Nov 2013

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- What it is. …

- What it is.
- How & Why people use it.
- Effects: (Physiological; Psychological; Behavioural).
- Short-term risks.
- Long-term consequences.
- Risk Reduction: (Strategies; Behaviours).
- Working with intoxication.
- Why now? Again!
- Community responses.
- Supports & Resources.


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  • 1. Methamphetamine Updated: November, 2013
  • 2. What we‟ll go over… • What it is. • How & Why people use it. • Effects: – Physiological; Psychological; Behavioural. • Short-term risks. • Long-term consequences. • Risk Reduction: – Strategies; Behaviours.
  • 3. What we‟ll go over… • • • • Working with intoxication. Why now? Again! Community responses. Supports & Resources.
  • 4. Methamphetamine is a stimulant drug: 1. Yes. 2. No. 3. I‟m not sure. 80% 11% 1 2 9% 3
  • 5. Methamphetamine affects the neurotransmitter(s): 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. Dopamine Serotonin Both Neither I‟m not sure 64% 14% 14% 6% 1 2 3% 3 4 5
  • 6. Methamphetamine can cause irreversible heart damage: 1. Yes. 2. No. 3. I‟m not sure. 71% Well... It can with long-term or heavy use. 26% 3% 1 2 3
  • 7. “Meth” irreversibly lowers a person’s intelligence and impairs cognitive functioning: 67% 1. Yes. 2. No. 3. I‟m not sure. 25% Well... It’s more complicated than that...!! 8% 1 2 3
  • 8. Carl Hart... Associate Professor at Psychology & Psychiatry Department, Columbia University, New York, NY • Is Cognitive Functioning Impaired in Methamphetamine Users? A Critical Review Neuropsychopharmacology (2012) 37, 586–608; doi:10.1038/npp.2011.276; published online 16 November 2011 Carl L Hart, Caroline B Marvin, Rae Silver and Edward E Smith • Video: "Methamphetamine: tempering hysteria with data" - Carl Hart http://youtu.be/2wNS_aRxTqs
  • 9. I know who this is: 58% Walter White, main character 1. Yes.in Breaking 2. No. Bad TV series. 30% 12% 3. I‟m not sure. 1 2 3
  • 10. Methamphetamine use is going up amongst high school students in Ontario: 1. Yes. 2. No. 3. I‟m not sure. 61% 36% 3% 1 2 3
  • 11. Ontario Student Drug Use & Health Survey Survey of 9,288 Ontario students in grades 7 to 12 during the 2010-2011 school year. http://www.camh.ca/en/research/news_and_publications/ontariostudent-drug-use-and-health-survey/Pages/default.aspx *Remember this survey is administered IN SCHOOL, so does not represent all youth in Ontario, and likely under reports use.
  • 12. Percentage Reporting Lifetime and Past Year Drug Use, Grades 7 to 12, 2005 OSDUS Alcohol Cannabis Cigarettes Other Hallucinogens Solvents Stimulants Ecstasy Cocaine Ritalin Glue Methamphetamine Crack LSD Barbiturates Tranquillizers Ketamine PCP Rohypnol OxyContin Heroin Ice GHB 65.5% 31.1% 33.0% 7.9% 8.4% 5.6% 5.2% 5.3% 3.3% 4.6% 2.9% 2.5% 2.4% 2.1% 2.2% 1.9% 1.4% 1.1% 1.3% 1.2% 1.2% 0.7% 100 80 1.2% (2011) 60 40 % Lifetime Use 20 1.0% (2011) 0 20 40 60 62.0% 26.5% 14.4% 6.7% 5.3% 4.8% 4.5% 4.4% 2.4% 2.3% 2.2% 2.0% 1.7% 1.7% 1.6% 1.3% 1.1% 1.0% 1.0% 0.9% 0.9% 0.5% 80 % Past Year Use 100
  • 13. People in Ontario drug treatment programs are reporting more use of methamphetamine: 1. Yes. 38% 38% 2. No. 3. I‟m not sure. 24% 1 2 3
  • 14. DATIS – Drug Treatment Admission Data, Ontario
  • 15. Drug Treatment Numbers • Only reflect people that actually made it to treatment: – geography; housing; mental health; stigma; types or treatment available • Do people honestly report all use  stigma? • More people in treatment does not necessarily mean more people using. – Long-term users presenting now? • Are people voluntarily coming or being “forced” (by courts/families)?
  • 16. Methamphetamine contains: 1. Anhydrous Ammonia 79% (fertilizer) 2. Red Phosphorus (matchboxes) 3. Lithium (batteries) 4. All of the above. 5. None of the above. Well... These are all used in the production. “Good” pure meth won’t actually contain these! Often lots of impurities, especially in “home-cooked” meth though. 7% 1 10% 3% 2 0% 3 4 5
  • 17. What is methamphetamine? • Stimulant. • Amphetamine family: – Amphetamine-type stimulants (ATS). – Amphetamine first synthesized in 1887. – Various versions over the years. • Methamphetamine - more potent amphetamine: – Particularly strong stimulant; – Potentially more “addictive”/problematic than many other drugs (e.g., E, K, G)… but this varies from individual to individual.
  • 18. Methamphetamine… • Has been in Ontario for years. • Not hard to find & relatively inexpensive. • Local & International production: – Individuals vs. Labs • Canada now exports to other countries. • Common names: – Crystal; Meth; Tina; Tweak; Crank; Ice – “Jib” (90‟s Toronto rave term)
  • 19. How is it made? • • • • • • • • • • • 2 Boxes Contact 12 hour time released tablets 3 Bottles of Heet (antifreeze) 1 Bottle of Rubbing Alchohol 1 Gallon Muriatic Acid (Used for cleaning concrete) 1 Gallon of Coleman's Fuel 1 Gallon of Aceton 4 Bottles Iodine Tincture 2% (don't get the declorized it won't work) 2 Bottles of Hydrogen peroxide 1 Can Red Devils Lye (sodium hydroxide) 4 Books Matches (try to get the ones with brown/red striker pads) 2 gallons distilled water = 2 - 3 grams of meth
  • 20. Methamphetamine Production
  • 21. Production Concerns • Concerns with poisonous chemicals and fumes. • Highly volatile chemicals  fires and explosions. • Toxic waste disposal.
  • 22. Crystal Methamphetamine • Price = ~$50-60 / bag (0.25 – 0.3 gram) • White to off white powder; crystal shards (like glass)
  • 23. Methamphetamine Can also look like…
  • 24. How is it taken? • Smoked (technically vaporized) • Injected (“slamming”) • Snorted • Swallowed: •As pills •“Parachuting” (wrapped in paper) • Inserted rectally (“booty bumping”) • Smoking and injection appear to be the most common ways.
  • 25. Routes of Administration Effects felt • • • • Inject Smoke Snort / rectal Swallow < 2 mins < 1 mins 5-10 mins 20-60 mins Duration (one dose) 3-7 hrs 3-7 hrs 4-10 hrs 5-12 hrs • Doses are repeated: – Every 3 - 8 hrs (to stay awake) – Every 0.5 - 4 hrs (to remain “high”) • Half-life: – How long it takes for half the drug to leave your body – Very long = 12 hours (cocaine = 2; mdma (ecstasy) = 4; ketamine = 1) Intensity of High / Euphoric Rush
  • 26. How does it work? • Stimulates CNS (acts like Adrenaline) • Release of neurotransmitters - Dopamine (pleasure / reward system) - Norepinephrine (energy / alertness) - Serotonin (mood / eat / sleep cycles) • Ecstasy  predominately serotonin • Cocaine  predominately dopamine
  • 27. Neural Pathways
  • 28. Brain Physiology 101 Neurons: brain signals and messages axon dendrite Source: http://www.dancesafe.org/drug-information/ecstasy-slideshow
  • 29. Brain Physiology Synapse: site of communication
  • 30. Brain Physiology Synapse: normal communication
  • 31. Brain Physiology Synapse: under the influence
  • 32. The Role of Dopamine • While all stimulants release some dopamine, crystal meth releases much larger amounts: – Cocaine releases 400% more dopamine – Crystal meth releases almost 1500% more dopamine
  • 33. FOOD 200 % of Basal DA Output NAc shell 150 100 Empty 50 Box Feeding 0 0 60 120 Time (min) Source: Di Chiara et al. 180
  • 34. 200 150 100 15 10 5 0 Scr Scr Bas Female 1 Present Sample Number 1 2 3 4 5 Scr Scr Female 2 Present 6 7 8 9 10 Mounts Intromissions Ejaculations Source: Fiorino and Phillips 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 Copulation Frequency DA Concentration (% Baseline) SEX
  • 35. Effects of Drugs on Dopamine Release Accumbens 1000 500 0 0 1 2 400 Accumbens DA DOPAC HVA 300 200 100 Time After Cocaine % of Basal Release Time After Methamphetamine 250 Accumbens Caudate 250 NICOTINE 200 150 100 COCAINE 0 3hr % of Basal Release % Basal Release 1500 % of Basal Release METHAMPHETAMINE Accumbens ETHANOL Dose (g/kg ip) 0.25 0.5 1 2.5 200 150 100 0 0 1 2 3 hr Time After Nicotine 0 0 1 2 3 Time After Ethanol Source: Shoblock and Sullivan; Di Chiara and Imperato 4hr
  • 36. Immediate Physiological Effects “What the drug is doing to the body.” • Fight or Flight response… • Increases heart rate & blood pressure: – Your pulse will beat faster • Raises body temperature: – Feel warmer; Sweat more. • Decreases appetite, sleep and pain – You probably won‟t feel like eating; You may not get hungry even if you are physically active when high (like with sex or dancing)
  • 37. Immediate Physiological Effects “What the drug is doing to the body.” • Decreases saliva; dry mouth; thirst. • Enlarges pupils. • Constricts blood vessels: – Less blood will flow to the surface of the body so your hands and feet may feel cold to the touch. – Hard to get an erection. • Jaw grinding/clenching
  • 38. Short-Term Psychological & Behavioural Effects Remember: Effects vary with Drug, Set and Setting • Increased sense of energy & wakefulness • Increased mental focus – Able to focus on a specific tasks “Tune things out” – ADHD  Adderall / Ritalin • Increased libido & sexual confidence – Get Horny; Experience “other forms of sex” – Intensifies sexual experience & prolongs sex play – Shame & Guilt; Body image
  • 39. Short-Term Psychological & Behavioural Effects Remember: Effects vary with Drug, Set and Setting • Decreased depression – Things that bothered you seem more manageable; Think less about the people, & situations that hurt or upset you; Feel happier or more content • Decreased inhibitions (may or may not be good)
  • 40. Short-Term Risks • Dehydration; heat stroke • Stroke / heart attack (esp. if mixing drugs) • Do something you regret – Impaired judgment & decision making regarding risks • Infection – Sharing snorting/smoking/injecting equipment – Unsafe sex • Oral abrasions
  • 41. Short-Term Risks • Missed medication doses • Enlarged pupils (people maybe able tell you‟re under the influence) • Miss school/work if still high or crashing • Heavy or extended “run”: – Paranoia / psychosis – Formication (feeling of bugs under the skin)
  • 42. Binge & Crash Cycle
  • 43. Withdrawal Symptoms • Tolerance dependent. • Symptoms can occur when use is stopped abruptly. – fatigue; long, disturbed periods of sleep; irritability; intense hunger, and moderate to severe depression. • People may hide or disappear for several days. • Length and severity related to how much and how often amphetamines were used. • Sleep!! Eat!!
  • 44. Long-Term Consequences • Dependence – psychological; non-life-threatening withdrawal • Weight loss – some people weight gain • Poor dental hygiene – “meth mouth” (similar is true of other drugs) • Sinus infection/damage if snorting • Skin irritations • Strains on internal organs (esp. heart)
  • 45. Long-Term Consequences • • • • Mood / sleep disorders Depression Anxiety Loss of sex drive or inability to have sex without using • Loss of finances; school; job; friends • Isolation; loneliness
  • 46. Anhedonia / Depression: Remember those post-synaptic receptors? • Dendrite will “prune” receptor sites to account for constant over-stimulation. • Loss of receptors makes it harder to receive messages.
  • 47. Brain & Early Recovery • Tough scenario: - Can‟t produce reward messages. - Cravings because you want just “feel better” or “feel normal”. - Judgment centre in the frontal cortex has been impaired - can lead to poor decision making. - This can all lead to using again or “relapse”.
  • 48. Brain & Early Recovery • Some damage can be permanent but, with sustained non-use, people can “get better”. • Important to remind people of this. • Brain plasticity: – Brain can return to “normal” or find new ways of coping. – This may take several months, even years.
  • 49. Staying Off Crystal • “Contains thoughts and advice from many gay and bisexual men who have walked this same path before...or still walk it. We don’t claim to be role models for perfect recovery. We’ve made some mistakes, and we don’t have all the answers. But we do offer hope and a belief that you can make it!” • Published by Seattle King County Public Health; adapted by the AIDS Committee of Toronto: http://www.actoronto.org/home.nsf/pages/act.docs.1770/$file/Stayin g%20Off%20Crystal.pdf
  • 50. Drug : Set : Setting Upper/Downer/Hallucinogen/ Strength/Purity/Cost DRUG Experience & Risks Psychological state/ Physical size and health/ Reason(s) for using/ Financial situation SET SETTING Physical location/ Who else is there/ Socio and cultural norms
  • 51. Drug : Set : Setting Three interrelated factors affecting a person‟s experiences and risks: Drug The drug, medication, pill being consumed. Set The person taking the substance. Setting The context in which it is taken.
  • 52. Drug What substance(s)? • The specific pharmacology of the substance(s) – Effects on physiology and neurochemistry. – Half-life: How long does it take the body to eliminate it? • How much is taken – Potency. – For some drugs you can take tiny amounts, others require a lot. • How it is taken (route of administration) affects: – How quickly the feeling “comes on”. – How intense it feels. – How long it lasts. • Quality of illicit substances – It may be hard to know what you‟re getting; the ingredients can include anything. What are they cut with? – A dealer may say a substance is one thing but sell something else. – It may look like the stuff from last time but it might be stronger or weaker, or have different ingredients.
  • 53. Set Who’s taking the substance? • • • • • • Size and body weight. Physical, mental, psychological state. How tired you are. Your mood before using. Reason(s) for using. Genetics. – How does your body metabolize drugs? • Experiences with this or other substances. – Tolerance; Habituation; Sensitization • Expectation, or anticipation, of how the substance will feel or effect you. • Did you eat recently if swallowing a drug? • Are you using other substances at the same time?
  • 54. Setting What’s the context? • Where are you? – Alone; with friends; with strangers? – Indoors or outdoors? – Quite setting or lots of people and noise? • What time of day? • What type of music is playing? • Rules and regulations. – Community and social attitudes towards certain substances or ways or taking them. – The legal status of different substances.
  • 55. Stereotypical Situations • • • • • Hetero male, 20, living on the streets Gay male, 54, HIV+(15yrs) Hetero female, 18, concerned with weight Bi male, 21, likes clubbing all night Hetero male, 36, long or late shifts
  • 56. Risk Reduction • Plan ahead before using; you may need a few days to recover. • Limit what you buy: – The longer you are high, the rougher you‟ll feel after. • Smoking & injecting seem to be more problematic. • Try to avoid sharing equipment. • Try to avoid mixing with other stimulant drugs.
  • 57. Risk Reduction • Try to eat something while high: – Protein shakes or fruit juices with healthy supplements are better than nothing. Feed your body the fuel it needs. – Keep hydrated • Use extra lube if having sex. • Accept the comedown: – Lack of sleep. Lack of food. Physically/mentally exhausted. • Spread out the use… not every week. – Neurotransmitters take time rebuild.
  • 58. Interactions With Meds Many recreational drugs may be dangerous when combined with prescription medications (including HIV meds), based on individual case reports, and what we know about how the body processes these drugs. Most interactions between recreational drugs and medications have not been scientifically studied, nor are they likely to be, given that most are illegal substances. However, people have shown through experience that “safer partying / use” is possible, and there are some specific tips that can help make drug use safer and healthier. Drug Interaction Tables Immunodeficiency Clinic Toronto General Hospital www.hivclinic.ca/main/drugs_interact.html “Facts for Youth about mixing Medicine, Booze and Street Drugs” http://www.drugcocktails.ca/
  • 59. Protease Inhibitors • Caution is necessary if you are taking HIV medications known as “protease inhibitors” (PIs) • Actual risk assessments of individual situations are hard to make. • These often boost the levels of other drugs in the bloodstream and body. • If you take recreational drugs while you also taking a protease inhibitor, you may end up with a stronger effect than intended, or in an overdose situation. • Consider taking a smaller dose than you used to before you started PIs, or quarter or half of the dose that others are using.
  • 60. Intoxication: What to look for • Signs of methamphetamine intoxication vary according to the amount of methamphetamine (and other drugs) taken and can include the following: • • • • Clenched jaw, teeth grinding (bruxism) Large (dilated) pupils Sweatiness Restlessness, agitation, pacing, repetitive movements
  • 61. Intoxication: What to look for • Rapid or pressured speech: – fast, loud and difficult-to-interrupt speech, or jumping from one topic to another • Impulsivity or recklessness. • Suspiciousness or paranoia. • Anger, irritability, hostility, particularly if it is out of character.
  • 62. Responding to an Intoxicated Person • Aims of responding: – Maintain a calm environment; – Reduce the chance they become angry or hostile; – Promote a positive and helpful interaction. • Remember – An intoxicated person has impaired judgment and will probably see the interaction differently to you.
  • 63. What You Should Do • Maintain a calm, nonjudgmental, respectful approach. • Allow the person more personal space than usual. • Try to steer the person to an area that is less stimulating: – Move away from other people, bright lights and loud sounds or music. – Ensure that the client and worker both have an easily accessible exit.
  • 64. What You Should Do • Listen and respond promptly to needs or requests: – “I hear what you are saying, so let me see what I can do to help.” • Use clear communication – Short sentences, repetition, and ask for clarification if you are unsure what is said. – “I really want to help, but I‟m not sure what you need. Please tell me again.”
  • 65. What You Should Do • Move around with the person to continue communication if necessary. • Have written information available for the person to take away. • Provide opportunistic, relevant, brief interventions if you are able.
  • 66. What You Should Not Do • Don‟t argue and don‟t use „no‟ messages. – If you cannot provide what they are asking for, be clear about what you can provide. • Don‟t take the person‟s behaviour or any criticisms personally. • Do not ask a lot of questions: – Ask only what is necessary to respond to the situation; – The person will have a low tolerance for frustration or questioning.
  • 67. What You Should Not Do • Don‟t undertake a lengthy interview or try to counsel the person: – If the person has presented for assessment or counselling, inform him or her that you cannot continue if he or she is intoxicated and agree to make a future appointment. – ???  May want to stay engaged with the person.
  • 68. Resource Guide • Treatment Approaches for Users of Methamphetamine: A Practical Guide for Frontline Workers. Jenner L and Lee N (2008). Australian Government Department of Health and Ageing, Canberra • http://www.nationaldrugstrategy.gov.au/internet/drugstrat egy/Publishing.nsf/content/8D2E281FAC2346BBCA257 64D007D2D3A/$File/tremeth.pdf
  • 69. Generations… • World War II – German, British, US, Japanese troops • 1960‟s – Speed Freaks!; Speed Kills! • 1990‟s – TRIP! Toronto Raves…”jib” • tweaker.org – San Francisco – 1997 • Popculture – Law and Order episodes – Fergie from Black Eyed Peas – Breaking Bad “Crissy”
  • 70. Recent years… • Production: – Internet: buy/sell/import; “how to make” instructions – Local vs. imported – Strength & purity have gone up • pre-cursor restrictions • Sub-populations – Oxycontin Removal • How it‟s used: – – – – Swallow Bump: nasal / anal Inject Smoke/Inhale “get off” / addiction
  • 71. Recent years… • Price point: – Dealer preference vs. cocaine / ecstasy • Element of organized crime pushing use: – Mexican cartels in U.S.; Biker gangs in Thunder Bay; Ecstasy producers in Toronto • “Mental health” of communities & nation – Consider economic & wartime status (esp. in U.S.) • The “in” drug for the media…
  • 72. Media • “Meth explosion!” – Occasional spikes in endemic use – Media portray horror stories and often neglect history • “More addictive than crack and heroin!” – Different drugs are more/less addictive for different people. – However, use can be more problematic than many other drugs. • “One hit and you‟re hooked!” – Simply not true! • Continue to feed mis-information and hysteria. • Has become ingrained in “Pop-Culture”…
  • 73. , 2013
  • 74. FALSE ALERT! There is absolutely no evidence of this and the email has been showing up in email inboxes for years now!
  • 75. Different approaches • Fear and abstinence based “education” • Punishment > Support or Treatment • Harm reduction and pragmatic information • Support or Treatment > Punishment
  • 76. Hi! My Name Is Tina.com • Comprehensive web-based: – – – – – Accurate information Non-judgemental and harm reduction Practical strategies Supports and resources Toronto specific • Utilize and adapt existing info (e.g., tweaker.org, knowcrystal.org, crystalneon).
  • 77. Keep it in check… STILL! • People always have and likely always will experience serious meth related concerns. • Meth is not be the problem, but the result of: – Loneliness; socializing; self-esteem; body image; energy – Mental Health – HIV • depression; libido; psychosocial impacts of early AIDS days
  • 78. Keep it in check… • “As long as I‟m not doing meth…” • One concerning major shift… … ongoing concern
  • 79. Keep it in check… • Political Climate – especially at the Federal level in Canada. • Funding – Education: Prevention and Harm Reduction – Treatment – Law Enforcement • Balance of Federal Drug Strategy: Justice > others
  • 80. Keep it in check… • Methamphetamine isn‟t new and will always be around. • We must compare and contrast communities and sub-populations. • We need to try and increase the transfer of generational knowledge and experiences. • Ongoing mis-information in the media.
  • 81. Existing Supports (Ontario) • DART (info about treatment) – www.dart.on.ca – 1.800.565.8603 – 24 hrs; anonymous; confidential • Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH) – Assessment: 416.535.8501 X 6616 • Rainbow Services – CAMH (LGBT addictions counselling) – Weekly meetings; 3 week sessions; (Meth specific group) – 416.535.8501 x 6784 • Find a Needle Exchange http://www.ohrdp.ca/find-a-needle-syringe-program/
  • 82. Resources for Gay Men • While the following website were generally created for gay men, by gay men, there is useful (and good) information for anyone. • Prevention and safer using info for gay men – himynameistina.com (Toronto based meth site) – knowcrystal.org – tweaker.org – crystalneon.org – torontovibe.com (ACT‟s party drug page) – erowid.org (all about every drug) • erowid.org/chemicals/meth/meth.shtml (specifically crystal meth) – tripproject.ca (info for youth in the “rave” scene)
  • 83. Contact Us Nick Boyce, Provincial Director nboyce@ohsutp.ca CC Sapp, Provincial Trainer ccsapp@ohsutp.ca 490 Sherbourne St., 2nd Floor Toronto, ON M4X 1K9 1-866-591-0347 (toll free) 416-703-7348 (t) www.ohsutp.ca

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