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Economic and Health Benefits of Research
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Economic and Health Benefits of Research

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  • Comparator countries: Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the US; Austria, Belgium, Finland, Ireland

Economic and Health Benefits of Research Economic and Health Benefits of Research Presentation Transcript

  • The Economic and Health Benefits of Research Jon Sussex Deputy Director, Office of Health Economics BioWales 2013 Cardiff, Wales • 19-20 March 2013 1
  • Agenda• Medical research• Health gains• Economic returns
  • UK Medical Research Funding Sources 2009/10 £billion Health Departments 0.7 MRC & Other Research Councils 0.8 Funding Councils etc. 1.1 Total Public Sector 2.6 Charities 0.9 Private Industry 4.5 TOTAL (est.) 8.0 Source: UKCRC (2012) UK Health Research Analysis 2009/103
  • Exceptional returns to UK public medical research • 39% rate of return (real, annual) to cardio- vascular research • 9% from health gains • 30% from economic gains
  • UK health gains from cardiovascular research Source: Medical Research: What’s It Worth?
  • Total number of QALYs gained in UK due to cardiovascular interventions 1985-20053000 Quitting smoking 1ary prevention2000 of CVD Chronic stable angina treatment1000 2ary prevention of CHD post-MI 0 Types of medical interventionSource: Medical Research: What’s It Worth?
  • Average time lag between spending on research and health impact ≈ 10-25 Years 200 Age and Number of UK Papers Cited in Seven UK Mean age of cited Cardiovascular Guidelines (2003-2007) papers is 12.5 years 160 Number of cited 120 + papers 80 Period between spending 40 and publication 0 + 1 3 5 7 9 11 13 15 17 19 21 23 25 27 Age of cited papers (in years) Period between recommendation and use Time Lag ≈ 10-25 yearsSource: Medical Research: What’s It Worth?
  • UK uptake of 61 medicines launched in the UK since 2007 compared to an average for 16 countries* 150% UK uptake per head standard units /country average uptake per head 100% 50% 0% YR1 YR2 YR3 YR4 YR5 Years from launch *Australia, Canada, France, Germany, Italy, Japan, the Netherlands, New Zealand, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland and the US; Austria, Belgium, Finland, Ireland Source: OHE analysis based on IMS (for volume data) and ONS/OECD (population data)
  • Economic gains include spilloversSource: Medical Research: What’s It Worth?
  • Shorter lags between research and economic benefit Ward and Dranove (1995) ↑ 1% public basic research in a particular therapeutic area (by US NIH) ↑ 0.76% in private R&D in same ↑ 1.71% in private R&D in othertherapeutic category over 7 years therapeutic category over 7 years In total, a 1% increase in public basic research across the board will generate up to a 2.5% increase in total private pharmaceutical R&D spend Toole (2007): Distinction between basic and clinical research ↑ $1 public research Additional private R&D After how many years? Basic $8.38 8 Clinical $2.35 310
  • Exceptional returns to UK public medical research • 39% rate of return (real, annual) to cardio- vascular research • 9% from health gains • 30% from economic gains
  • Conclusions• Public, charity and private medical research are complementary and total >£8bn p.a.• Together they yield major health gains, albeit after long time lags• And important economic gains, after shorter time lags• Shorten the time lags to increase the gains
  • ReferencesHERG, OHE and RAND Europe. (2008) Medical research: what’s it worth? London: Office of HealthEconomics.Toole, A. (2007) Does public scientific research complement private investment in research anddevelopment in the pharmaceutical industry? Journal of Law and Economics. 50(1) 81–104.UK Clinical Research Collaboration. (2012) UK Health Research Analysis 2009/10. London: UKClinical Research Collaboration.
  • To enquire about additional information and analyses, please contactJon Sussex at jsussex@ohe.orgTo keep up with the latest news and research, subscribe to our blog, OHE News.Follow us on Twitter @OHENews, LinkedIn and SlideShare.Office of Health Economics (OHE)Southside, 7th Floor105 Victoria StreetLondon SW1E 6QTUnited Kingdom+44 20 7747 8850www.ohe.orgOHE’s publications may be downloaded free of charge for registered users of its website.©2013 OHE