Your SlideShare is downloading. ×
0
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×

Thanks for flagging this SlideShare!

Oops! An error has occurred.

×
Saving this for later? Get the SlideShare app to save on your phone or tablet. Read anywhere, anytime – even offline.
Text the download link to your phone
Standard text messaging rates apply

Ohio Education Research Center: Christopher King Keynote Presentation

783

Published on

Published in: Education
0 Comments
0 Likes
Statistics
Notes
  • Be the first to comment

  • Be the first to like this

No Downloads
Views
Total Views
783
On Slideshare
0
From Embeds
0
Number of Embeds
2
Actions
Shares
0
Downloads
0
Comments
0
Likes
0
Embeds 0
No embeds

Report content
Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
No notes for slide

Transcript

  • 1. Putting Research into Action for Student, School and System Success Christopher T. King The University of Texas at Austin Ohio Education Research Center Conference Columbus, OH June 28, 2012
  • 2. OutlineBackgroundCentral Texas: A Multifaceted, Multi-sector EffortCollective (or Individual) Impact?Student Futures Project: Research in ActionSuccessesLessons Learned
  • 3. Our Story BeginsA school board member, a chamber VP, a nonprofit director and an academic walk into a bar ...Each is concerned about problems facing the education system in Central Texas.Timely data about the situation and how best to address it are difficult to access, of dubious quality, and in short supply.
  • 4. BackgroundClosing the Gaps reports (2000, 2004) cite the challenge of changing demographics: rising % Hispanic, first-gen students with much lower college- going rates.2004 Market Street Report highlights growing shortage of college-educated talent as problem for Austin v. other ‘benchmark’ cities/regions.2004-2005, Greater Austin Chamber (GAC) asks UT’s Ray Marshall Center (RMC) for help with data access and use, forms task force to address talent shortage.2007, Texas creates 3 Education Research Centers (ERCs). RMC partners with UT-Dallas and others.
  • 5. Collective Impact?Five (5) conditions—• Common Agenda• Shared Measurement• Mutually Reinforcing Activities• Continuous Communication• Backbone SupportDoes GAC’s Central Texas Initiative qualify?Source: Hanleybrown, Kania & Kramer, “Channeling Change: MakingCollective Impact Work,” Stanford Social Innovation Review (2012)
  • 6. Common AgendaShared vision for change with common understanding of the problem and joint approach to solving it. Goals• To increase the direct- to-college enrollment rate to 62% in 2010, and to 70% in 2015.• To increase college and career-readiness rates (added later).
  • 7. Backbone SupportSeparate organization with staff and specialized skills serving as ‘backbone support’ for the effort and coordinating participating organizations.Greater Austin Chamber (GAC) has:• Played a vital, visible, respected role in educational policy, programming and systems change.• Raised funds via Opportunity Austin and advocated for bond elections.• Staff highly skilled and experienced in education at all levels, and expertise in policy advocacy and coordination of complex, multi-faceted efforts.• Pressed for accountability at all levels, serving as a ‘critical friend’.
  • 8. Mutually Reinforcing ActivitiesActivities differentiated but coordinated through a mutually reinforcing plan of action.• Proactive college and career-readiness counseling (ISDs, campuses)• Tutoring to bring students up to college/career standards (nonprofits)• Financial Aid Saturdays (GAC, TG, ISDs, volunteers)• Early College Connection (Austin Community College)• Data collection & analysis (Student Futures Project of the RMC, some ISDs)• Lobbying for policy and systems change (GAC)
  • 9. Continuous CommunicationConsistent, open communication building trust, assuring mutual objectives and creating common motivation.• Monthly College Readiness and Enrollment Support Team (CREST) meetings, chaired by ISD counselor with reps from ISDs, campuses, colleges, non- and for- profits.• Periodic Financial Aid Task Force meetings.• Real-time FAFSA and Common Application reports.• Regular ISD and community briefings, including reports from the Student Futures Project.
  • 10. Shared MeasurementCollect data and measure results consistently across actors to ensure efforts are aligned and actors are accountable.• Student Futures Project collects and analyzes data over time.• In addition to real-time FAFSA and Common App reports, Chamber produces periodic ISD and college progress reports.• Monthly CREST meetings convened by GAC serve as key neutral venues for presenting and discussing results and their implications for policies and programs.Student Futures Project and its role …
  • 11. Our Story ContinuesThe school board member, Chamber VP and nonprofit director convince the academic to:• Identify and assess best practices for data collection, analysis and performance management• Design an approach to meet Central Texas’ needsThe 2004-2005 LBJ School study led to the launch of the Central Texas Student Futures Project, which began with a 4 ISD pilot in Spring 2005.
  • 12. Research Questions What are graduating seniors’ high school experiences, plans and preparation for life after high school? What share of high school graduates enroll in postsecondary education, become employed, or do both in the fall after graduation? What share of graduates are enrolled and/or employed over time? Which factors are significantly associated with positive postsecondary education and employment outcomes? How do outcomes change over time for cohorts of graduates and selected populations groups?Reports can be found at: www.centexstudentfutures.org
  • 13. Data Sources Historical Senior Surveys School Records  Family background/  Student demographics influences  Courses taken  High school experiences  Course grades  Preparation for life after high school PostsecondaryEducation Records Employment Records  National Student  Texas Unemployment Insurance (UI) wage records Clearinghouse  Texas Education Research Center records
  • 14. Student Futures SuccessesSFP research has informed and contributed to policyand practice improvements since mid-2000s. Forexample:• Data on 2- and 4-year, in- and out-of-state college enrollments and labor market outcomes• ‘Aspiration gap’ and strategies for addressing it• Role of financial aid processes and uncertainty• Understanding cumulative effects of key activities on college-going and variation by student subgroup• Describing and understanding varying college, training, career & other pathways (underway via WDQI & ERC)
  • 15. Composition of Graduates (2007 Districts)Shares of Hispanic and low-income graduates gradually increasing. Class Class Class of of of 2007 2008 2009 Totals 9,410 10,452 10,793 Ethnicity Asian 6% 6% 6% Black 11% 12% 12% Hispanic 29% 31% 32% White 52% 52% 48% Gender Female 48% 50% 50% Male 50% 50% 50% Family Income Status Low-income 21% 23% 26% Not Low-income 73% 73% 70% Special Education Status Special Education 9% 9% 9% Not Special Education 85% 87% 87%
  • 16. Postsecondary Enrollment of Central Texas Graduates in Fall Following Graduation by College Type, Ethnicity and Income Status 2007 2008 2009* 2-Year 4-Year 2-Year 4-Year 2-Year 4-YearEnrolled Graduates (%) 22% 40% 22% 39% 23% 38%Ethnicity Asian 21% 57% 20% 63% 17% 64% Black 23% 35% 22% 33% 26% 36% Hispanic 22% 22% 23% 22% 25% 23% White 23% 49% 22% 49% 23% 46%Income Status Low-income 21% 19% 20% 19% 24% 21% Not low-income 23% 47% 23% 47% 24% 46% Unknown 21% 12% 21% 12% 19% 5%* Overall demoninator includes 100 students who lacked enough information to link to NSCrecords; 61% reflects the best possible rate using NSC and THECB data.
  • 17. Regional, State, and National Postsecondary Enrollment Outcomes75% 70%70% 69% 68% 68% 67% 66%65% 62% 62% 61% 61% 61%60% 57%55% 54% 54% 53%50% 52% 50% 51%45% 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 TX Enrollment (In-State, THECB) Central Texas Enrollment (NSC) National Enrollment (BLS)
  • 18. Percent of 2009 Graduates Enrolled in Fall 2009, by College Type and District (N=11,993)80% 72%70%60%50% 44% 41%40% 38% 36% 35% 30% 28%30% 27% 27% 23% 23% 22% 22% 25% 23% 24% 18% 19% 20%20% 15% 15%10%0% 2-Year 4-Year
  • 19. Percent of 2009 Graduates Enrolled in Fall 2009, by Location and District (N=11,993)80%70% 61% 60%60% 57% 57% 54% 52% 52%50% 40% 39% 39% 39%40% 30%30%20%10% 7% 7% 7% 8% 3% 3% 4% 4% 1% 2%0% In-State Out-of-State
  • 20. Employment Status, Graduation to Fall 2011 Five Quarters Post High School70% 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 0.61313156 0.628103134 0.552161532 0.539831686 54%60%50%40% 2006 2007 200830% 2009 201020% 201110%0%
  • 21. Median Wages, Graduation to Fall 2011 Fall After of High School Graduation 2007 2008 2009 2010$6,000 $2,064 $1,913 $1,737 $1,842$5,000$4,000 2006$3,000 2007 2008 2009$2,000 2010 2011$1,000 $0
  • 22. College Enrollment Aspiration Gap100% Aspiration Gap80% 89% 91% 91% 91% 91% 82% Want to go to college but face barriers, some of60% them financial Subset of these students40% might be considered 62% 61% “low-hanging fruit” 61% 61% 62% 57% A little help might go a20% long way to increasing regional DTC rates. 0% 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 College Intention (Survey) College Enrollment (NSC)
  • 23. College Enrollment Aspiration Gap, 2006 through 2011100%80% 89% 91% 91% 91% 91% 82%60%40% 57% 62% 61% 61% 61% 62%20% 0% 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 College Intention (Survey) College Enrollment (NSC)
  • 24. Participation in College Preparation Activities, 2006 through 2011100%80% 89% 91% 24% Points 81% 77%60% 67% 70% 55% 56% 58% 18% Points40% 51% 46% 40%20% 0% 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 FAFSA Submission College Entrance Test
  • 25. Senior Survey Recent Trends Plans for Postsecondary Enrollment100% 91% 91% 91% 86% 88% 88% 88% 82% 81%75%50%25% 0% Overall Hispanic Low-Income 2008 2009 2010 Primary Reason for Not Choosing Postsecondary Enrollment40% 36% 36% 31% 29% 32%30% 24% 23%20% 16% 18% 14% 12% 11%10% 7% 6% 6% 0% Financial Academic Personal Personal Other preference obligation 2008 2009 2010
  • 26. Senior Survey Recent Trends Primary Reason for Not Submitting FAFSA50% 40% 39%40%30% 22% 22% 22% 22%20% 11% 10%10% 5% 7%0% Do not Parents Probably Dont Dont need aid not wont know plan willing qualify process to enroll 2009 2010
  • 27. Predicted Cumulative Effects on College Enrollment Baseline Enrollment Cumulative Effect Enrollment -65% Overall 4% 3% -48% Hispanic 6% 6% 5% -45% Low Income 6% 4% 3% 3% 3% -49% First Generation 10% 8% 5% 4% 3% -81% Top Quartile 6% -70% Second Quartile 6% 3% 3% -60% Third Quartile 6% 5% -39% Last Quartile 6% 5% 3%-100% -80% -60% -40% -20% 0% 20% Met w/Counselor about College Completed FAFSA Plan to Pay for College Using Loans Took SAT/ACT Prep. Course Participated in College Fair Considered Financial Aid Easy
  • 28. Lessons LearnedEstablishing a robust data-driven approach to shapingpolicies and programs is time-consuming and complex.Turnover will occur among leaders, supervisors,operating staff, counselors and others. Trustingrelationships must be continually rebuilt.A continuous improvement, learning process ispreferred to more traditional accountability ones.Posing the right questions and getting the rightanswers are two very different things. The latter maynot be as susceptible to scheduling as the former.Ongoing researcher/practitioner engagement, top-to-bottom, is critical, in part to ensure researchersunderstand data that practitioners are providing.
  • 29. Lessons …Be mindful of unintended consequences; they areinevitable on both sides. (See “The Importance ofTrusting Relationships”)Despite recent progress, FERPA may still be a 4-letterword. Data access can be fragile.Engaging non-education, non-researcherstakeholders—especially business and civic leaders—is difficult and time consuming, but it pays largedividends over time.Maintaining research capacity based within colleges oruniversities is valuable and lends additional credibilityto educational improvement efforts.
  • 30. Our Story Isn’t Over YetThe school board member, Chamber VP and nonprofit director and the academic are still working together, now joined by an ever wider circle of partners and stakeholders.The Student Futures Project has grown to 12 ISDs, surveys 85% of seniors in the 4-county region and has 50,000+ students in its longitudinal database. Other areas interested in replicating the GAC/SFP model.The Texas ERC now allows survey and job training data to be uploaded and linked to education and employment records. ERCs are being rebid at present, though state support is lacking.
  • 31. For More InformationChristopher T. King, DirectorRay Marshall CenterLyndon B. Johnson School of Public AffairsThe University of Texas at Austinctking@raymarshallcenter.org512.471.2186www.centexstudentfutures.orgwww.raymarshallcenter.org

×