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Randall Eberts - Integrating employment and economic development, lessons from the US and Australia
 

Randall Eberts - Integrating employment and economic development, lessons from the US and Australia

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Presentation by Randall Eberts, Executive Director, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, United States. ...

Presentation by Randall Eberts, Executive Director, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, United States.

9th Annual Meeting of the OECD LEED Forum on Partnerships and Local Governance (Dublin-Kilkenny, Ireland), 26/27 March 2013.

http://www.oecd.org/cfe/leed/9thfplgmeeting.htm

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    Randall Eberts - Integrating employment and economic development, lessons from the US and Australia Randall Eberts - Integrating employment and economic development, lessons from the US and Australia Presentation Transcript

    • 9th Annual Meeting IMPLEMENTING CHANGE: A NEW LOCAL AGENDA FOR JOBS AND GROWTHIn co-operation with the EU Presidency, Irish Government and Pobal 26-27 March 2013, Dublin-Kilkenny, IrelandPLENARY SESSION I: A NEW LOCAL AGENDA FOR JOBS AND GROWTH Randall Eberts President, W.E. Upjohn Institute for Employment Research, United States
    • Forum on Partnerships and Local Governance, Dublin & Kilkenny, March 2013 “Implementing Change: A new local agenda for jobs and growth” INTEGRATING EMPLOYMENT AND ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT, LESSONS FROM THE UNITED STATES AND AUSTRALIAMarch 26th, 2013Randall Eberts, President, W.E. Upjohn Institute forEmployment Research, United States
    • Skills Shortage and Mismatch• Employers complain they can’t find enough qualified workers• Without qualified workers, employers can’t fill job openings and employers can’t create jobs• Increasing skills and improving the match between the supply of and demand for skills is a critical challenge
    • Real Consequences of Skills Gap Larger the skills gap, the lower the job creation Each dot is a US metro area; data provided by Rothwell, 2012
    • Real Consequences of Skills GapLarger the skills gap, the higher the unemployment rate Each dot is a US metro area; data provided by Rothwell, 2012
    • Integrating supply and demand• OECD/LEED has studied models that integrate workforce development and economic development to increase skills, improve skills utilization, and reduce the skills gap• Basic components of integration: – Flexibility – Partnerships – Collaboration
    • Prerequisites for Effective Collaboration• Vision• Strategic planning• Leadership• Metrics• Resource Alignment• Trust• Collaborative infrastructure
    • Models of Integration: US and Australia• Similarities – Contract out JSA to private providers – Local providers – Performance outcomes – Initial screening and identification of needs • JSCI for Australia; WPRS for US – Reemployment Assessment Plans – Strategic plans – Local and state economic development efforts
    • Models: DifferencesAustralia United StatesNational agency contracts JSA Local WIBs contract JSA and trainingPayment based mostly on performance Payment based mostly on formula, withoutcome financial incentives for making/missing targetsNational VocEd qualifications Local and/or industry qualificationsDemand-driven training: industry, unions, Demand-driven training: employers andprofessional associations at national level local community colleges at local leveldefine outcomes required from training develop training curriculumMore national skills standards, national Few national skills standards; mostly statetraining products and local standards 16 mandated programs co-located at One- Stop Career CentersLocal Employment Coordinator: identifies Local WIBs offer opportunity to be catalystneeds and match with employers, for integrating economic development andeducation and training facilities workforce development at local level
    • U.S. WIBs: Partnership Catalyst Partnership Arrangements Vouchers or training accounts Federal Administrative $$ Programs fee to WIB Administrative Businesses accountability $ State Non - financial Agreements $$ $$ County WIB Government Local organizations Master Inter - local Contract Sub - Agreement contracts Administrative Agent Memoranda of County Understanding Government Leadership role with non - contractual service organizations
    • Payoff to Partnerships States with more local WIBs tend to have higher placement rates WIA Adult Program, 2006Q3 88% Participants who found employment 86 CA 84 82 MI 80 TX 78 76 74 72 70 0 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 50 Number of WIBs within a state
    • Conclusion• Narrowing the gap between demand for and supply of skills is a critical challenge for job creation• Local flexibility and autonomy can foster partnerships that connect workforce and economic development• The two models provide examples of local areas that use their flexibility to form effective partnerships to help create jobs