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COPIE Toolkit for inclusive entrepreneurship
 

COPIE Toolkit for inclusive entrepreneurship

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Presentation from the capacity building seminar “Financing business start-up by under-represented groups”, 27-29 June 2012, Trento – Italy; organised by the Local Economic and Employment ...

Presentation from the capacity building seminar “Financing business start-up by under-represented groups”, 27-29 June 2012, Trento – Italy; organised by the Local Economic and Employment Development (LEED) Programme and its Trento Centre at the OECD in collaboration with the Directorate-General Employment, Social Affairs and Inclusion of the European Commission. See www.trento.oecd.org

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    COPIE Toolkit for inclusive entrepreneurship COPIE Toolkit for inclusive entrepreneurship Document Transcript

    • THE COPIE TOOLKITFOR INCLUSIVEENTREPRENEURSHIPDeveloped and tested by the partners of theCommunity of Practice on Inclusive Entrepreneurship (COPIE)
    • COPIE’s formula on inclusive entrepreneurship ∑ COPIE = e(e) COPIE’s lesson is that you can create employment through entrepreneurship. e = s × i × q A comprehensive strategy for inclusive entrepreneurship is strategic, integrated and quality based. i = s × t × i × p Integration means involving stakeholders, tailoring to target groups, coordinating instruments and paying attention to process (education – pre-start ... post-start). q = c × l Quality requires both capacity and learning, so that it improves over time.2
    • ContentsCOPIE’s formula on inclusive entrepreneurship 2Inclusive Entrepreneurship in the new regulations for EU Structural Funds 5the copie toolkit IN DETAIL 6stage 1: Diagnosis 7 The COPIE Diagnosis Tool 8stage 2: Stakeholder engagement in policy planning 10 COPIE Action Planning Tools 11stage 3: improving service infrastructure 13 entrepeneurship education 13 COPIE Entrepreneurship Education Diagnosis Tool 13 COPIE Entrepreneurship Education Case Study: Finland 15 Quality Management 16 Survey and comparative analysis of skills requirements for business advisors 16 COPIE business advisor profiling 18 COPIE business advisor training 20 COPIE business advisor self-help guide 21 COPIE business start-up advisor passport 22 Integrated Business Support 23 COPIE Resources Map Tool 23 Access to Finance 26 COPIE Manual on Access to Finance for ESF Managing Authorities 26List of COPIE partners and experts 28 3
    • preface In 2010, 32.5 million people were self-employed in the European Union (EU). This is equivalent to approximately 15% of total EU employment. The European Employment Observatory confirms that ‘Self-employment is an important driver of entrepreneurship and job creation and thus contributes to the European Union’s goals of more growth and better jobs’. But the full potential of self-employment is not and national entrepreneurship support structures. yet tapped; especially when it comes to people With this summary document, we are now from disadvantaged backgrounds who still face pleased to present the COPIE tools to a broader significant barriers in setting up and running their range of decision-makers and stakeholders in own business. entrepreneurship from across Europe. Promoting inclusive entrepreneurship and As part of this COPIE Toolkit for Inclusive introducing effective support measures Entrepreneurship, readers will find included a means assisting people to take control of first stage diagnostic tool to map the strengths their professional future, attain professional and weaknesses of existing regional or national satisfaction, realise a better income and entrepreneurship structures. To foster active contribute to regional growth. To design and stakeholder engagement in designing an inclusive deliver deliberately inclusive entrepreneurship entrepreneurship policy, we also suggest a joint policies across Europe is thus not only relevant action planning methodology that can be applied for reducing unemployment but also for fostering throughout the overall policy planning process. active labour-market inclusion of the (long-term) We finally offer a series of instruments for support unemployed, economically inactive women, interventions in the four priority areas of: single parent households, migrants and ethnic minorities, young people, seniors, people living qqentrepreneurship education; in rural areas, individuals with disabilities, or ex- qqquality management for start-up and business offenders. advice; qqintegrated business support; and As a transnational learning network established qqaccess to finance. in 2009, we as the Community of Practice on Inclusive Entrepreneurship (COPIE) have We are pleased to offer this set of tools for worked together on a set of tools that allow for a your own policy planning, and we trust that our strategic, integrated and high quality approach to experience will help decision-makers and ESF inclusive entrepreneurship policy in the European Managing Authorities from across Europe to Structural Funds (ESF). We have developed and design and deliver similar initiatives for the new tested these tools over the past three years to period of the European Structural Funds (2014– assess and improve our own individual regional 2020). With best wishes, The partners of the Community of Practice on Inclusive Entrepreneurship (COPIE)4
    • introductionInclusive Entrepreneurship in thenew regulations for EU Structural FundsOn March 14, 2012, the EU Commission presented the ‘CommonStrategic Framework’ (CSF) which intends to help Member States andtheir regions in programming and setting clear investment priorities forthe next financial planning period from 2014 until 2020.A central focus of this framework is to ‘increase coherence between policycommitments made in the context of Europe 2020 and investment on the ground’, andto ‘combine various funds to maximise the impact of EU investments’ (EU Commissionpress release March 14, 2012).In terms of COPIE’s work on fostering inclusive entrepreneurship in Europe, theCSF confirms the importance of investments into self-employment and socialentrepreneurship. As part of the thematic objectives 8: ‘Promoting Employment andSupporting Labour Mobility’ and 9: ‘Promoting Social Inclusion and Combating Poverty’,key priorities are set out for self-employment, social entrepreneurship and socialinnovation.Actions defined for the ESF include:qqSupport in particular for unemployed, disadvantaged and inactive people to start and develop businesses in all sectors, including care and health, work integration, green jobs and community development. Such support comprises skills development, including information and communications technology (ICT), entrepreneurial and management skills, mentoring and coaching and the provision of inclusive business development and financial services for business starters.qqCapacity-building and support structures for the promotion of social enterprises, in particular through social entrepreneurship education and training, networking, the development of national or regional strategies in partnership with key stakeholders, and the provision of business development services and easier access to finance.Actions defined for the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF) include:qqDevelopment of business incubators and investment support for self-employment and business creation, in particular in areas offering new sources of growth, such as the green economy, sustainable tourism (including the silver economy) and health and social services. 5
    • introduction With the COPIE Toolkit for Inclusive Entrepreneurship, COPIE is well prepared to propose to EU Member States and their regions a set of instruments on how to design and deliver inclusive entrepreneurship policies. the copie toolkit IN DETAIL By offering a methodology on joint action planning for inclusive entrepreneurship policy, COPIE responds to the Commission’s call for coordination among EU Structural Funds and their programming at the Member State and regional level. With the COPIE diagnosis tool regions and Member States in Europe can gather crucial data and assess and reflect on the current state of the entrepreneurial system. The COPIE tools on quality management, access to finance, integrated business support services and entrepreneurship education help to design effective interventions in these priority areas of inclusive entrepreneurship support. In addition, to share and increase knowledge on inclusive and social entrepreneurship across Europe and beyond, COPIE set up an online wiki knowledge centre called wikipreneurship in 2008. Wikipreneurship.eu currently contains about 1,000 articles on inclusive entrepreneurship, local development, social entrepreneurship and social innovation. The diagram below provides you with an overview of all the COPIE tools: In the chapters that follow, each stage and its respective tools will be explained in more detail. They offer information on added value; steps for implementation; resources required; origin; stage of development; case studies; and additional web links. A complete list of contact persons is included at the end of this document, and we cordially invite you to make use of them and get in contact with our COPIE members and partners for first-hand experience.6
    • stage 1 diagnosis Diagnosis Introduction The development of successful inclusive entrepreneurship policies requires a good understanding of the existing entrepreneurship support environment. COPIE has thus developed a tailored methodology to assess strengths and weaknesses of existing start-up support infrastructures.  In contrast to other studies such as the Global Entrepreneurship Monitor (GEM), which provide aggregate data for the national level, COPIE’s analytic focus is on sub-national regional and local contexts. Capturing perceptions and views of relevant stakeholders in a selected region, city, or city district provides decision-makers with a detailed picture of the current positive and negative features of regional support systems. At the same time, the application of the methodology helps to raise awareness of the specific needs of certain target groups among the different stakeholders during the process of gathering information. Following the same methodology of diagnosis across various COPIE partner regions furthermore allows for comparison between different regional infrastructures and helps to identify successful approaches and promising initiatives from across Europe.7
    • stage 1 diagnosis The COPIE Diagnosis Tool Brief The COPIE Diagnosis Tool is a standardised instrument for assessing local or regional description business support infrastructures and their inclusive approach towards entrepreneurship. and added It combines a secondary analysis of the overall start-up environment in the region value with a direct survey among decision-makers, start-up and business advisors, and entrepreneurs. The survey analysis focuses on the The benefits of the COPIE Diagnosis Tool following questions: include: qqHow do decision-makers, advisors qqincreased awareness of strengths and and entrepreneurs assess the overall weaknesses within the regional support framework conditions and the economic infrastructure; and political funding environment for start-up initiatives in their region? qqopportunities for comparing perceptions of the needs of different stakeholder qqDo the three groups perceive existing groups and clients; and regional support services differently? qqprovision of access to European qqIs it possible to identify specific groups good practice in specific areas of of people that experience disadvantage entrepreneurship support and while realising their goal of becoming self- the opportunity for transnational employed? collaboration through COPIE. Steps for To implement the COPIE Diagnosis Tool, the following five steps need to be taken:implementation e Step 1: Commissioning of study To ensure a direct link between the study and the policy-making process, the study should ideally be commissioned by a political decision-making body (e.g. a Ministry of Economy or a Ministry of Labour). Step 2: Secondary analysis e This includes framing the area of study and collecting relevant data (e.g. on economic conditions, employment situation, market sectors, offers for those interested in setting up a business and for businesses, etc.). e e e Step 3: Selection and contacting of interviewees Step 4: Conduction of interviews and collection of results Step 5: Preparation of an overall report and joint reflection of recommendations for action Resources For the secondary analysis, one person is required for one month to conduct the initial required research and to compile the results. q For the interview process the following resources are required: qqStaff time or expert fee (usually one or two people) to identify relevant interview partners for the three survey groups (decision-makers, advisors and entrepreneurs). qqStaff time or expert fee (two people for the duration of one to two months) to schedule and conduct the interviews, and to compile the data. qqStaff time or expert fee (one person) for one month to produce the final report. COPIE has produced a manual on how to use the COPIE Diagnosis Tool which is available free of charge through the COPIE website. In addition, COPIE provides the questionnaires to conduct the interviews in different formats with the three stakeholder groups of decision-makers, advisors and entrepreneurs. An evaluation tool and a manual on how to use the evaluation tool can also be obtained through the COPIE lead contact upon request. 8
    • stage 1 diagnosis Origin The COPIE Diagnosis Tool was developed by a group of COPIE members in 2006/2007 in the context of the European Community Initiative EQUAL. It has experienced a series of updates with the latest one being realised in 2011 with support from iq consult GmbH, Berlin. Stage of Mature (applied and tested in more than three regions/Member States) development Further Further documents related to the Tool: details www.cop-ie.eu/copie-tools-copie-diagnosis-tool Local or regional implementation – final reports: www.cop-ie.eu/policy-debate-copie-reports Case studies Wales (2007) Flanders (2007) Asturias (2007) Basque Country (2008) Rheinhessen (2008) Torino (2009) Portugal (2007) Berlin-Mitte (2007) Ustecky Region (2008) Andalusia (2008) Extremadura (2008) Venice (2009) Lisbon Brandenburg (2010) Limerick, Longford, Dublin (2008) Vienna (2011) Northamptonshire (2009) Lisbon & Azores, Portugal (2012) Testimonial “Inclusive Entrepreneurship is in an early stage in Portugal. For us, the application of the Diagnosis Tool confirms that business starters need to be able to realise their business concepts, being conscious that micro-initiatives faces a series of specificities that are different to traditional models; namely that at the centre of a micro-business is the entrepreneur. In order to strengthen skills and to meet the individual needs of the entrepreneurs, the tool identifies the need of an integrated supported-system that has to be flexible and has to take into account the regional level. In the actual Portuguese context the tool works like a check list helping to clarify that the vulnerable groups needs tailored and integrated support systems, identifies the gaps, and that this is not business as usual. The tool works like a starting point to identify new strategies to support these business starters.” Catarina Silva Maciel, Portugal “ he tool works like a starting T point to identify new strategies to support these business starters.”9
    • stage 2 stakeholder engagement Stakeholder engagement in policy planning Introduction Designing inclusive entrepreneurship policies based on a sound understanding of successful structures and of challenges requires a multi-stakeholder and cross-departmental approach. The fundamental message that runs right through COPIE’s approach to policy planning is that no single department, no single agency, no single organisation will be successful in creating an entrepreneurial region or Member State. It is therefore essential from the outset that the key organisations work together and deliberately and explicitly agree to follow some form of joint action planning. Building upon the COPIE Diagnosis Tool which calls for an inclusive entrepreneurship regional action plan, COPIE has chosen to test a specific methodology on action planning. This methodology can be used to bring together stakeholders to create consensus about what needs to be achieved, how best to evaluate it, what the collective communication messages are and how to ensure residual value at the end of the programme. 10
    • stage 2 stakeholder engagement COPIE Action Planning Tools Brief The COPIE Action Planning Tools for developing and sustaining effective inclusive description entrepreneurship policies focus on the following topics: and added value qqDeveloping a common vision qqAgreeing an evaluation strategy qqBuilding an integrated campaign qqPlanning for a legacy These topics were identified through baseline studies in participating COPIE partner regions. They can be adapted and changed to other local or regional priorities. According to the action planning methodology, each topic is addressed through a specific 1.5 day interactive and participatory workshop. The workshops start with an analysis of what is currently state-of-the-art in the respective topic area, before leading on towards discussing visions of success and comparing experience to date. Participants are then asked to reflect on strengths and further areas of development. At the end of each workshop delegates are encouraged to commit to undertake specific actions which are followed up after the workshop through a series of teleconferences. By involving a range of entities including ESF Managing Authorities, business support providers and policy departments in the workshops, this approach to action planning helps to address the issues from various angles and thus plan policies in a truly integrated approach. It helps partners to integrate EU-funded activity with locally-funded activity, and it stimulates practical actions of value to all attendees. Steps for Partners will need to have an interest in joining up activity in promotion of implementation entrepreneurship supported by regional/Member State funds and structural funds from Europe. Step 1:  e Commissioning of baseline study and identification of four or five key stakeholders The baseline study will confirm policy intentions of each stakeholder and resources currently available to the support of entrepreneurship and opportunities for future joint working. The selected stakeholders will be interviewed as part of the baseline study and they (or members or their organisations) are expected to participate in the workshops. Step 2: e Realisation of the four 1.5 day workshops The exact topics for these workshops will be agreed following the baseline study. Workshops can be held solely in a given region but are more valuable to participants when held with other regions .The format works well with four regions participating, each bringing four delegates. If the scheme is run on an interregional basis, workshops would be hosted by each region in turn. In the testing of the action planning methodology, four workshops were held each with four or five Member States/regions. Step 3: e Workshop report and follow-up of pledges for action through teleconferences11
    • stage 2 stakeholder engagement Resources Partners will need to be able to identify a person to act as the first point of contact for the required action planning. This person would agree arrangements in advance of each workshop and q provide feedback after each workshop by email and teleconference. The meeting rooms would be provided by the host partner institution, any travel and accommodation costs for delegates attending would be met by the delegates themselves. The costs for implementing the COPIE Action Planning Tools include: qqStaff time or expert fee for the baseline studies plus travel and subsistence. qqStaff time or expert fee to run the workshops plus travel and subsistence. These costs need to be calculated for up to 20 delegates and need to include all liaison with regional coordinators in advance of the event, facilitation of the workshop itself and the delivery of a report recording the workshop. Origin The tool was developed by Iain Willox, the COPIE expert for the topic of Action Planning to the German Federal Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs. Stage of Mature (applied and tested in more than three regions/Member States) development Further Further documents related to the Tool: details http://www.cop-ie.eu/copie-tools-action-planning Case studies Asturias (2010) Czech Republic (2010) Germany (2010) Flanders (2010) Wallonia (2010) Testimonials “I have understood how I might use more role models, and I have reconfirmed how important it is to provide appropriate support to all interested people and in particular achieve a good geographical coverage. In addition, the idea that entrepreneurship could be seen as a transversal activity is an interesting one.” Jenny Charlier, Director, ESF Agency French Speaking Belgium “I now have a deeper awareness of the necessity for cooperation between the Department of Labour and the Department of Economy, for example, the need to ensure that frontline officers from both departments have at least basic information about both employment opportunities and self-employment opportunities. I also have a deeper awareness of the necessity for a good allocation of promotion and communication budgets to stimulate desire to start up a business. This must be seen differently to the requirement for accurate and up-to-date information about how to start up.” Didier Clarinval, Responsable de l’animation transversale, Agence de Stimulation Economique “ have a deeper I awareness of the necessity for a good allocation of promotion and communication budgets to stimulate desire to start up a business.” 12
    • Stage 3: Improving service infrastructure – education Entrepreneurship Education Introduction Entrepreneurship is one of the eight key competences for lifelong learning and represents a valuable set of knowledge, skills and attitudes that enable people to transform ideas into actions. The role of education in the development of this competence should not be underestimated. Evidence suggests that making entrepreneurship education an integral part of the curriculum leads to an increase in entrepreneurial intention and attitude but also to greater prospects to get a job. The Europe2020 strategy thus highlights the importance of entrepreneurship education in promoting a more competitive and entrepreneurial workforce. COPIE Entrepreneurship Education Diagnosis Tool Brief description The COPIE Entrepreneurship Education Diagnosis Tool builds upon the COPIE Diagnosis and added value Tool as described in Stage 1 of this COPIE Toolkit. It is structured in a very similar way: Policy-makers, practitioners, intermediary organisations, students and employers are asked to rate and comment on a series of statements about the definition, policy, practices, evaluation and dissemination of entrepreneurship education programmes in a selected geographical area. Opinions are then compared with the help of the tool. The benefit of the Entrepreneurship Education Diagnosis Tool is that it helps policy- makers and practitioners to analyse, reflect and identify the main gaps or challenges in the entrepreneurship education ecosystem by involving all relevant stakeholders. To address these gaps and challenges decision-makers are then exposed to existing good practices elsewhere in Europe to help design an action plan for entrepreneurship education. Steps for The tool can be applied by following five simple steps: implementation Step 1: e Setting up a regional support group e Step 2: Selecting a geographical area Step 3: e Selecting interviewees from different stakeholder groups Step 4: e Analysing matrix results Step 5: e Action planning based on results13
    • Stage 3: Improving service infrastructure – education Resources Ideally, the regional support group consists of: required qqManaging Authority or Intermediate Bodies for EU Structural Funds q qqPolicy-makers representing ministries involved (e.g. Education and Economy) qqA national/regional expert Other people can be included as necessary. For the interview process the following resources are required: qqStaff time or expert fee to identify relevant interview partners for the three survey groups (decision-makers, advisors and entrepreneurs). qqStaff time or expert fee to schedule and conduct the interviews, and to compile the data. qqStaff time or expert fee to produce the final report. COPIE has produced a manual on how to use the COPIE Entrepreneurship Education Diagnosis Tool which is available free of charge through the COPIE website. In addition, COPIE provides the questionnaires for the different stakeholder groups. An evaluation tool and a manual on how to use the evaluation tool can also be obtained through the COPIE lead contact upon request. Origin The COPIE Entrepreneurship Education Diagnosis Tool was developed by Ciudad Industrial del Valle del Nalón, S.A.U. (Valnalón) in Asturias as part of their function as COPIE lead experts on entrepreneurship education to the ESF Unit at the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs in Spain. In the course of the process, Valnalón experts closely cooperated with iq consult GmbH, Berlin, who have responsibility for adapting the COPIE Diagnosis Tool. Stage of Young (tested in at least one region) development Further Further documents related to the Tool: http://cop-ie.eu/thematic-groups- details entrepreneurship-education-tools Case studies Saxony-Anhalt (2012) Testimonial “Working with the COPIE Education Tool showed us once more: Fostering Entrepreneurship Education has to be realised as a collaborative action – while all players in the field of course continue to follow different perspectives. This gets even more challenging as the world of schools and the world of companies are still not familiar with each other.” Gerhild Vollherbst, Deutsche Kinder- und Jugendstiftung (German Children and Youth Foundation)“ orking with the COPIE W Tool showed us once more: Fostering Entrepreneurship Education has to be realised as a collaborative action.” 14
    • Stage 3: Improving service infrastructure – education COPIE Entrepreneurship Education Case Study: ESF support to entrepreneurship education in Finland Brief Finland has consistently been using ESF funds to finance entrepreneurship education description projects in a unique way. Under a specific National Development Programme for and added Entrepreneurship Education, ‘Driving Change through Entrepreneurship Education and value Competence Development Programme’, the Finnish National Board of Education has been acting as the funding authority and grants support for ESF projects developing entrepreneurship education. The main aims for projects are defined as follows: qqPromoting teachers’ and principals’ competence in entrepreneurship education. qqCreating regional networks across school boundaries, which include different stakeholders. qqBuilding learning pathways supporting business and entrepreneurial competence from pre-primary to higher education. qqDeveloping learning environments and teaching materials, familiarising learners with business activities and increasing action-based learning for individuals and groups. In all their activities, the Finnish decision-makers have put a specific emphasis on coordination of initiatives, aligning projects to overall investment priorities and cross- departmental collaboration. By describing the Finnish approach in detail, the COPIE report provides insights into ways on how to open up new funding possibilities for entrepreneurship education projects within the framework of the ESF 2014–2020 programming period. It specifically focuses on three mains aspects: qqIntegration of entrepreneurship education within Finland’s current ESF Operational Programme. qqCoordination method between ESF and the Ministry of Education. qqImplementation and impact of ESF-funded entrepreneurship education projects. The Finnish case can thus serve as a case study for other Member States and regions interested in strengthening entrepreneurship education through the European Social Fund. Further A PDF copy of the report can be obtained here: details http://cop-ie.eu/sites/default/files/TG_Education_Finland_studyvisit_report_may2011. pdf Testimonial “Before going to Helsinki, I expected to get during the study visit a good view on how entrepreneurship education is organised in Finland. I must say that my expectations were fully met. We even got an overview of other ESF-supported projects too. What struck me most is ‘the culture of confidence’ in the education system in Finland. Lessons learned are that we have to better diffuse best practices in Flanders and that we have to focus on teacher training.” Ilse Boeykens, Department of Economy, Science and Innovation, Flemish Government15
    • Stage 3: Improving service infrastructure – quality Quality Management Introduction As recognised by various EU studies, self-employment is an important driver of entrepreneurship and job creation in Europe. It offers a professional opportunity for people to gain their own income and become independent from social welfare transfers, especially in times of high unemployment. Tailored support can help these people to overcome initial start-up barriers which they might encounter due to the nature of their business, their background or existing framework conditions that favour larger high-growth businesses over micro and small sized companies. However, in order to have a meaningful impact, this support has to be offered in line with a sound quality management system which takes into account the changing support requirements within the start-up environment. Ideally, this quality management system is established at a regional or national level. Key aspects to be considered when designing the system are: qqenhancing transparency in the business advisor market; and qqsetting mandatory standards for publically funded support schemes. This not only increases competition between service providers but also helps both public agencies and entrepreneurs to make a sound choice. As part of COPIE’s work, the Thematic Group on Quality Management has developed a tailored model for a regional or national quality management structure for inclusive entrepreneurship support. More details on this model can be obtained through the COPIE website. Survey and comparative analysis of skills requirements for business advisors Brief The survey helps decision-makers to obtain information on how different groups of description stakeholders perceive the overall relevance of certain skills requirements for business and added advisors, and on how these groups then assess the situation in their geographical value location in this regard. The three groups addressed are entrepreneurs who are in the process of starting up a business, businessmen/women who have set up a business in the last two years and business start-up advisors. The survey is based on a defined matrix of competences which refers to four areas of knowledge, experience, skills and advisory approach, and it contains additional questions which help to evaluate the regional business start-up support infrastructure. As a result, the survey allows for a quantitative comparative analysis between the different groups. Decision-makers will be able to identify differences between the three related groups and get an overview of where to optimise advisors’ capabilities. 16
    • Stage 3: Improving service infrastructure Steps for To carry out the survey, the following steps need to be taken: implementation e Step 1: Selection of groups to be interviewed (minimum of 10 people per group) e Step 2: Definition of the interview methodology This could be one of the following options: Online survey using one of the free/open source tools (LimeSurvey or SurveyMonkey) or other appropriate applications Email with a MS Word or PDF form attached Telephone interviews Forms sent out by ordinary mail Personal interviews Step 3: e Collect data based on methodology and compile all the data in the Excel analysis tool which is provided together with the questionnaires Step 4: e Evaluate data by using existing charts and/or by adding new ones in order to get the best insight on the data Resources Staff time or expert fee (one person) for one month with knowledge on how to run required surveys, analyse and summarise the data. q COPIE provides the three questionnaires (for advisors, businessmen/women, and existing entrepreneurs) as MS Word or PDF files and also offers the evaluation tool in an MS Excel template. Survey documents are currently available in English, Spanish and German. Origin The survey was developed by iq consult GmbH, Berlin, which serves as the COPIE expert consultancy for the topic of quality management to the German Federal Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs. Stage of Young (tested in at least one region) development further The survey is available for download here: http://cop-ie.eu/copie-tools-quality- details management Case studies Extremadura (2010) Galicia (2010) Spain (2010) Testimonial “This tool brings the entrepreneurs’ real needs to light and puts them in contrast with the real support offered at regional level.” Aurelio Jiménez Romero, INCYDE Foundation, Spain17
    • Stage 3: Improving service infrastructure COPIE business advisor profiling Brief The business advisor profiling is a (self-) assessment tool for business advisors. It helps description them to evaluate their skills against a defined set of standard competences that are and added required for working as business start-up advisors. The questionnaire to be used during value the profiling is based on a defined matrix which shows the minimum requirements towards competences and refers to a set of basic training modules. It refers to all topics as defined in each training module, putting greater emphasis on knowledge and skills as compared to experience and approach. The business advisor profiling is useful to identify training needs, but also shows key aspects to be considered throughout a business start-up advisor selection process. The questionnaire can also be used from an organisation or an evaluation stance to identify competence gaps among a group or a network of business advisors. This approach at the same time serves as a strong mechanism to define and design broader training programmes. Steps for If used for self-assessment, business advisors can simply download the questionnaireimplementation and the evaluation sheet from the COPIE website. If used in a group setting, the following steps need to be taken: Step 1: e Decision on group to interview e Step 2: Definition of interview methodology The options are: a. Online survey using one of the free/open source tools (LimeSurvey or SurveyMonkey) or other appropriate applications b. Email with a MS Word or PDF form attached c. Telephone interviews d. Forms sent by ordinary mail e. Personal interviews Step 3: e Collect data based on methodology and compile all the data in the Excel analysis sheet which is provided together with the questionnaires e Step 4: Evaluate data by using existing charts and/or by adding new ones in order to get the best insight on the data The qualitative data will be checked and, if needed, the evaluator will contact advisors to clarify or add more information. 18
    • Stage 3: Improving service infrastructure – quality Resources Staff time or expert fee (one person) for one month with knowledge on how to run required surveys, analyse and summarise the data. q COPIE provides the questionnaire in a MS Word or PDF format and the evaluation tool in an Excel file. The survey documents are available in English, Spanish and German. Origin The business advisor profiling was developed by iq consult GmbH, Berlin, which serves as the COPIE expert consultancy for the topic of quality management to the German Federal Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs. Stage of Young (tested in at least one region) development Further The profiling documents are available for download here: http://cop-ie.eu/copie-tools- details quality-management Case studies Galicia (2011) Spain (2011) Saxony-Anhalt (2012) Testimonials “This tool is really useful if you have to select and manage a homogeneous group of advisors. All competences are assessed, and strengths and weaknesses are easily identifiable.” Aurelio Jiménez Romero, INCYDE Foundation, Spain “This tool has helped us to identify skills gaps, also among highly experienced advisors, and to close them through tailored offers.” Dr. Renate Ott, Regional business advisors network, Saxony-Anhalt “ his tool has helped us to T identify skills gaps, also among highly experienced advisors, and to close them through tailored offers.”19
    • Stage 3: Improving service infrastructure – quality COPIE business advisor training Brief The COPIE Thematic Group on Quality Management defined a set of basic training description modules to help trainees to achieve the minimum requirements for becoming business and added start-up advisors. value The titles of the nine training modules are: 1. The consultation process 6. The enterprise’s daily life 2. The entrepreneur 7. Financing 3. The advisor 8. Financial planning 4. The enterprise 9. Practice module 5. The market Descriptions of the training modules are currently available in Spanish, German and English (only the first module). A short table summary is also available in all three languages. Steps for Although the steps required for implementing the training modules will vary from oneimplementation organisation to another, it is recommended that before starting to define the training programme, potential participants apply the COPIE business advisor profiling. The results from this exercise will help the organisation in charge of designing the training programme to set priorities among the different topics. Resources The exact human and material resources needed to implement all the modules depend required on various factors. When planning the implementation of the tool, decision-makers are q encouraged to take into consideration the number of (potential) advisors to be trained; the nature of the geographical area in which the training sessions are to take place; the number of teachers available and the time frame in which the entire programme is to be implemented. COPIE provides detailed descriptions of modules 1–8 and a short summary document which refers to all nine modules. Origin The COPIE business advisor training was developed by iq consult GmbH, Berlin, which serves as the COPIE expert consultancy for the topic of quality management to the German Federal Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs. Stage of Young (tested in at least one region) development Further The training modules are available for download here: http://cop-ie.eu/copie-tools- details quality-management Case studies Galicia (2011) Rheinhessen (2012) Testimonial “To date there are no tailor-made training offers for established advisors. With this tool new career entrants can be trained and already established advisors can plan for their further education.” Dr. Ralf Sänger, Coordinator of the Federal start-up service of the nationwide Integration through Qualification (IQ-network) 20
    • Stage 3: Improving service infrastructure – quality COPIE business advisor self-help guide Brief Based on the British ACCBA/SFEDI community-based business advisors’ guide, COPIE’s description Thematic Group on Quality Management has developed a self-learning handbook in and added Spanish for business advisors in Galicia. The guide is written and designed in a way that value advisors can refer to the appropriate sections whenever they need to, rather than read from cover to cover. Throughout, advisors find that the guide: qqintroduces them to the real life world and work of a business advisor; qqhelps them develop their own confidence, capability, competence and knowledge; qqprovides them with analytical tools and checklists which they can use to help their clients; qqdeals with problems and opportunities a client may have from pre-start, through start- up, to an existing business; qqshows them where to go if they need more assistance; and qqcontributes to them meeting competence standards developed by COPIE and gets them ready to be assessed against these standards. To complement the theoretical sections, case studies from local business advisors have been included to bring the reader closer to the advisor’s real experiences. Steps for The handbook can be distributed for groups or networks of advisors to complement implementation formal training programmes. Its distribution can be in digital form or in paperback version. Resources In order to adapt the handbook to the desired implementation area, staff time or an required expert fee for at least one person is required for a period of at least one month to q coordinate and write the case studies. If the handbook requires adaptations in terms of its graphic design or of language, staff time or an expert fee for an extra person would be also required. COPIE provides the basic layout in an InDesign format. Origin The business advisor self-help guide was developed by iq consult GmbH, Berlin, which serves as the COPIE expert consultancy for the topic of quality management to the German Federal Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs. Stage of Young (tested in at least one region) development Further The guide is available for download here: http://cop-ie.eu/copie-tools-quality- details management Case study Galicia (2011) 21
    • Stage 3: Improving service infrastructure – quality COPIE business start-up advisor passport Brief The COPIE business start-up advisor passport is an individual instrument for business description start-up advisors to plan, control and document their skills development process. The and added passport shows the current state of training within each of the eight training modules value required to be certified as junior advisor at any time. Advisors can thus prove that they have acquired specific skills in business start-up support. With the passport, advisors are given a comprehensive overview of the contents of the junior advisor training. Advisors will therefore have a document which contains detailed information on the prior knowledge and skills they have acquired and the qualifications they will achieve during the training programme. The passport aims to raise awareness among advisors and helps them review and document their progress. Steps for Once the specific contents of the training programme are defined and updated, basedimplementation on an InDesign file, the document file is ready to be printed. The coordinating organisation can then distribute the material among the advisors, together with a user guide and an explanation of how the control process will work. Resources If needed, staff time or an expert fee for one person is required to update the curricula required descriptions. Printing of materials can be subcontracted to a professional printing q service. COPIE provides an InDesign file which can be adapted to the individual organisational framework. Origin The business advisor start-up passport was developed by iq consult GmbH, Berlin, which serves as the COPIE expert consultancy for the topic of quality management to the German Federal Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs. Stage of Young (tested in at least one region) development Further The business advisor passport is available for download here: http://cop-ie.eu/copie- details tools-quality-management Case study Galicia (2011) 22
    • Stage 3: Improving service infrastructure – integrated services Integrated Business Support Introduction Providing for effective business support services is at the heart of regional entrepreneurship programmes. Member States and regions in Europe have established and financed a large number of support structures and schemes for different sectors and for different stages in the entrepreneur’s itinerary. However, to in effect offer all entrepreneurs tailored assistance throughout the whole process of starting up a business, i.e. from the development of the idea up to the consolidation and growth stage, it is crucial to take an integrated and coordinated approach to service delivery. This requires the collection of information on existing business support structures and their services and resources for collaboration in the area. To ensure transparency and effectiveness of the system, this information needs to be distributed among clients in an easily accessible way. COPIE Resources Map Tool Brief The COPIE Resources Map offers users a comprehensive overview of existing description organisations and services, based on a detailed analysis of the business support and added infrastructure in a given geographic area. By grouping services along the five stages of value motivation, pre-start-up, start-up, access to finance and growth and consolidation, it serves as a structured guide for both clients and stakeholders in the region. Compared to other diagnostic tools described in the Toolkit, the Resources Map does not specifically focus on gathering customer or stakeholder feedback on individual segments of the support chain. As a basis for further reflection it rather seeks to capture and provide detailed data and information on all services offered and on the resources available to clients. In fact, the very process of collecting the data allows public and private stakeholders to actively engage in a process of discussion on the role of individual organisations and services within the overall entrepreneurial support chain. Depending on the results of this analysis, decision-makers are able to identify the strengths and to then design an action plan to address weaknesses or fill gaps in the support environment. The Resources Map Tool therefore enhances the effectiveness and efficiency of support structures and organisations delivering services in the area, and, as a result, the allocation of public resources.23
    • Stage 3: Improving service infrastructure – integrated services Steps for To implement the Resources Map Tool, the following steps need to be taken:implementation Step 1: e Setting up a regional support group The implementation of future policy actions requires the active involvement of decision- makers. This should be realised by setting up a regional support group and by explaining - current thinking, process, objectives and expected outcomes of this action to the stakeholders from the outset. e Step 2: Identification of all entrepreneurship support services active in the selected geographic area. This step is highly relevant to establish a mechanism for an extension of work based on the agreed objectives. It should involve those working on each stage of the entrepreneur’s itinerary. e Step 3: Definition of work methodology including online tools or other forms of collaboration e Step 4: Collection of data through standardised questionnaire e Step 5: Evaluation of data and reflection of results among key stakeholders e Step 6: Development of Resources Map document based on standard format e Step 7: Distribution of Resources Map among decision-makers (in the first step) and service providers and other institutions that have direct access to potential clients Resources Access to decision-makers (Directorates-General (DGs) and Managing Authorities) who required define policies and design programmes to promote entrepreneurial spirit in the area, and q one expert on this issue in the area. The development of the Resources Map requires staff time or expert fee: qqto identify entrepreneurship support services acting in the area and contacts; qqto establish guidelines and coordination of data collection; and qqto create the Resources Map document. COPIE provides a Resources Map guide to help organise business support services in a European region. It is available free of charge through the COPIE website. In addition, COPIE provides the standardised questionnaire to develop the Resources Map as well as a sample Resources Map document from the Spanish Principality of Asturias. 24
    • Stage 3: Improving service infrastructure – integrated services Origin The Resources Map was developed by CEEI Asturias which serves as the COPIE expert consultancy for the topic of integrated business support to the Principality of Asturias. Stage of New development The questionnaire has been used by the Czech Republic, Galicia, Kaunas region and Extremadura. Further A guide on how to apply the Resources Map is available for download here: http://www. details cop-ie.eu/copie-tools-integrated-business-support case studies Asturias (2007) Czech Republic (2011) Galicia (2011) Kaunas (2011) Testimonial “The Resources Map is a key element to organise business support structures in the region according to their role in the entrepreneur’s itinerary. It helps to identify strengths and weaknesses of the organisations and the business support package, and as a result, allows for new policies and the implementation of services of added value to promote and improve entrepreneurship and to optimise the existing structure.” Noemi Iglesias, Business & Innovation Centre Galicia “ he Resources Map T is a key element to organise business support structures in the region.”25
    • Stage 3: Improving service infrastructure – finance Access to Finance Introduction 92% of all businesses in Europe are micro-businesses with less than 10 employees. They contribute significantly to the European economy and play a major role with regard to employment and the European labour market. In addition, self-employment and micro-entrepreneurship in particular have proven to be a way of facilitating social and economic inclusion for individuals excluded from the labour market. These include the (long-term) unemployed, economically inactive women, single parent households (mostly headed by women), migrants and ethnic minorities, youths, seniors, people living in rural areas, individuals with disabilities, or ex-offenders. When thinking about starting up or in the process of running a business, access to appropriate finance is a major barrier for these people to realise their ambition. Therefore, the European Union has given microcredit high priority as a cross-cutting theme in the Union’s internal, regional, enterprise and employment policies. In fact, in 2007 the European Commission estimated the potential demand for microfinance by entrepreneurs from at- risk groups at 712,900 loans representing 6,145 million EUR. With the financial crisis taking place, it is assumed that this demand is expected to be even higher. European Structural Funds can serve as an effective mechanism to unlock financial opportunities for small scale entrepreneurs from disadvantaged backgrounds. As, in fact, confirmed COPIE, ‘microfinance lies at the intersection of at least two structural funds’ scope: the European Social Fund (ESF) and the European Regional Development Fund (ERDF)’. Due to the variety in the regulatory environment between regions and Member States, individual models of using European Funds for microfinance differ. Exchanging experience is therefore key for future policy-making in this area. COPIE Manual on Access to Finance for ESF Managing Authorities Brief The COPIE Manual on Access to Finance for ESF Managing Authorities supports ESF and description ERDF Managing Authorities in organising and implementing microfinance schemes through and added financial engineering in the framework of a dedicated inclusive entrepreneurship policy value within the National Reform Plans and the associated Operational Programmes. The Manual follows a step-by-step approach along the main decision points in a policy cycle and combines information, experience, tools and examples from the COPIE partnership and the wider microfinance community in Europe that is relevant to the design of microfinance operations under the ESF. It specifically: qqaddresses strategic and operational issues in microfinance systems; qqpresents tools, methods and checklists to identify and assess policy as well as policy implementation issues and options; qqanalyses the legal and institutional environment; qqdiscusses good governance and the linkages between financial institutions and business; qqidentifies development services; and qqprovides practical examples. By using the Manual to design microcredit schemes, decision-makers are exposed to clear pathways to policy development in microfinance, and they can learn from practical experience of other ESF Managing Authorities at the same time. A crucial aspect for any programme to be considered is its potential of becoming independent from public aid in the long term. In the field of microfinance, through the ESF, decision-makers can help build capacities of financial intermediaries and test, adapt and professionalise credit procedures for the future. In this, the Manual serves as an important guide. 26
    • Stage 3: Improving service infrastructure – finance Steps for The handbook is available for download on the COPIE website and can be implementation distributed among decision-makers and financial service providers. Contact information for specific schemes is included in the document. Origin The Manual was written by the German Microfinance Institute which serves as the COPIE expert consultancy on microfinance to the ESF Managing Authority Flanders. Case studies and experience from other regions and Member States in Europe were gathered through a series of peer review events conducted as part of the COPIE Thematic Working Group on Access to Finance. More information on this process can be found on the COPIE website. Stage of New development Further The Manual is available for download here: http://www.cop-ie.eu/copie-tools- details access-to-finance More information on COPIE’s Thematic Group on Access to Finance and the different peer review meetings can be found here: http://www.cop-ie.eu/ thematic-groups-access-to-finance Testimonial “Working within COPIE is a very useful practice for INVEGA while working with the ESF. Fostering entrepreneurship is a core contribution to the European development.” Viktorija Jonušaitė, Investicijų ir verslo garantijos (INVEGA), Lithuania27
    • List of COPIE partners and experts Central Federal Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs, GermanyManagement EF 2 – ESF Implementation and lead Wilhelmstr. 49  10117 Berlin, Germany partner Tel.: ++49 (0)30 18527-6792 Action Fax: ++49 (0)30 18527-5104 Planning, Contact person: Bettina Reuter Quality Contact email: bettina.reuter@bmas.bund.de Internet: http://www.bmas.deFurther lead ASTURIAS (SPAIN): Lead partner: Integrated Business Support partners Regional Ministry of Economy and Employment – General Directorate of Trade and Entrepreneurs – Department of Entrepreneurs Contact email: dgcomercio@asturias.org CZECH REPUBLIC: Co-lead partner: Access to Finance Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs, Department for ESF Management Contact email: Filip.Kucera@mpsv.cz FLANDERS (BELGIUM): Lead partner: Access to Finance ESF Agency Flanders Contact email: joeri.colson@esf.vlaanderen.be SPAIN: Lead partner: Entrepreneurship Education Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs – European Social Fund Unit Contact email: ggarciagp@meyss.es Group of ANDALUCIA (SPAIN): Quality Management additional Regional Ministry of Employment – Regional Employment Service partners Contact emails: clarai.carmona@juntadeandalucia.es and mariaa.cruzado@juntadeandalucia.es EXTREMADURA (SPAIN): Quality Management, Integrated Business Support Regional Ministry of Equality and Employment Contact email: dgempleo.sexpe@extremaduratrabaja.net GALICIA (SPAIN): Quality Management, Integrated Business Support Regional Ministry of Economy and industry – Business & Innovation Centre (BIC Galicia), Regional Ministry of Labour (Directorate-General for Recruitment and Entrepreneurship) and Regional Ministry of Treasure (Directorate-General for Economic Planning) Contact emails: niglesias@bicgalicia.es and mcancelo@bicgalicia.es LITHUANIA: Access to Finance, Integrated Business Support Ministry of Social Security and Labour Contact emails: Arturas.Bytautas@socmin.lt and Zaneta.Maskalioviene@socmin.lt WALLONIA (BELGIUM): Action Planning ESF Agency French Speaking Belgium Contact emails: jenny.charlier@fse.be and caroline.vanderlinden@fse.be 28
    • Dissemination Incyde Foundation (Spain): Quality Management, Entrepreneurship Education partners Contact email: aurelio.jimenez@cscamaras.es Ministry of Economy of the German Federal State of Baden-WuerttemberG (Germany) Contact email: elke.burkhardt@mfw.bwl.de IQ Network Integration through qualification (Germany): Quality Management Contact email: ralf.saenger@ism-mainz.de Deutsches Mikrofinanz Institut (DMI) e.V. (German Microfinance Institute) (Germany): Access to Finance Contact email: brigitte.maas@mikrofinanz.net German Children and Youth Foundation (Germany): Entrepreneurship Education Contact email: gerhild.vollherbst@dkjs.de COPIE COPIE Diagnosis Tool: Norbert Kunz, Florian Brix, iq consult GmbH Thematic Contact emails: kunz@iq-consult.com and brix@iq-consult.com Experts Action Planning, Central coordination: Iain Willox Contact email: iainwillox1@btinternet.com Quality Management: Norbert Kunz, Benat Egana, iq consult GmbH Contact emails: kunz@iq-consult.com and egana@iq-consult.com Access to Finance: Marion Cahen, Hefboom and Brigitte Maas, Deutsches Mikrofinanz Institut (DMI) e.V. (German Microfinance Institute) Contact emails: marion.cahen@hefboom.be and brigitte.maas@mikrofinanz.net Entrepreneurship Education: Iván Diego Rodriguéz, Valnalón Contact email: ivan@valnalon.com Integrated Business Support: Ana Mendez, CEEI Asturias Contact email: ana@ceei.es Central coordination – Communications & Dissemination: Stephanie Koenen Contact email: mail@koenen.co.uk29
    • This action is supported by theEuropean Commission under the‘Learning for Change – Settingup Learning Networks under theESF 2007–2013’ programme.
    • Published by:Federal Ministry of Labour and Social AffairsEF 2 – ESF Implementation53107 Bonnwww.esf.dewww.cop-ie.euText:Stephanie Koenen and COPIE Thematic ExpertsPhotos:Frank Woelffinger, Berlin, www.studio36.deLayout:Heedi Design, Edinburgh, www.heedi.co.ukJune 2012This action is running under ‘Learning for Change – Settingup Learning Networks under the ESF 2007-2013’ andreceives funding by the European Commission.