Managing internationalisation: institutional co-operation

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Mihaylo Milovanovitch …

Mihaylo Milovanovitch
OECD Directorate for Education
LACHEC 2011
Cali, Colombia

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  • 1. Managinginternationalisation:institutional co-operation Mihaylo Milovanovitch OECD Directorate for Education LACHEC 2011 Cali, Colombia
  • 2. 34 OECD MembersAustralia (1971) Hungary (1996) Poland (1996)Austria (1961) Iceland (1961) Portugal (1961)Belgium (1961) Ireland (1961) Slovak Republic (2000)Canada (1961) Israel (2010) Slovenia (2010)Chile (2010) Italy (1961) Spain (1961)Czech Republic (1995) Japan (1964) Sweden (1961)Denmark (1961) Korea (1996) Switzerland (1961)Estonia (2010) Luxemburg (1961) Turkey (1961)Finland (1969) Mexico (1994) United Kingdom (1961)France (1961) Netherlands (1961) United States of America (1961)Germany (1961) New Zealand (1973)Greece (1961) Norway (1961) 2
  • 3. OECD Directorate for Education Indicators and Analysis Centre for Management Educational of Higher Research and Education Innovation OECD Directorate for Education (EDU) Programme for Education & Cooperation Training with Non- Policy members 3
  • 4. Projected Tertiary Enrolments in 2025 under Recent Trends (2005=100) 175170150 145 139 140 133130 125 127 127 127 128 128 120 120 116 113 114 115 116 110110 100 10190 93 94 89 91 8570 69 6350 OECD (2008): Higher Education 2030, Vol. 1 Demography 4
  • 5. Long-term growth in the number of students enrolled outside their country of citizenship Growth in internationalisation of tertiary education (1975-2008, in millions)Source: Education at a Glance 2010 5
  • 6. The composition of the global talent pool has changed…Countries’ share in the population with tertiary education, for 25-34 and 55-64 year-old age groups, percentage (2009) 25-34-year-old population55-64-year-old population About 39 million people About 81 million people who attained tertiary level who attained tertiary level
  • 7. …and will continue to change… Share of new entrants into tertiary education in 2009 (all OECD and G20 countries) Other China, 36.6% countries, 4.8%Netherlands, 0. 5% Chile, 1.3% OtherAustralia, 1.3% Portugal 0.5% Czech Republic 0.4% Italy, 1.4% Israel 0.4%Spain, 1.6% Sweden 0.4%Poland, 2.1% Belgium 0.4% Hungary 0.4%Germany, 2.5% United Austria 0.4% States, 12.9% New Zealand 0.3%Argentina, 2.7 % Switzerland 0.3% Korea, 3.1% Slovak Republic 0.3% Mexico, 3.1% Denmark 0.2% Russian Norway 0.2% Federation, 10. United 0% Ireland 0.2% Kingdom, 3.3% Indonesia, 4.9 Finland 0.2% Turkey, 3.7% Japan, 4.2% % Slovenia 0.1% Estonia 0.1% Iceland 0.0%
  • 8. Changing demands for skillsPreparing future professionals and citizens with the right skills  Increasing international convergence in skills demand  ‘21st century skills’ Creativity and innovation, Critical thinking, Problem solving, Communication, Collaboration, Information fluency, Technological literacyChanging skill demand with the advent of the knowledge economy Economy-wide measures of routine and non-routine task input (US) Routine manual 65 Accelerating trend since 1990s 60 Nonroutine manual 55 Routine cognitive 50 45 Nonroutine analytic 40 8 1960 1970 1980 1990 2002 Nonroutine interactiveLevy and Murnane
  • 9. An important fact of higher education life• Internationalisation is a fact, not an option• Hence, the main question now is: What strategies for managing internationalisation? 9
  • 10. Internationalisation impact: possible areasA sample of categories of indicators on internationalisation (IMPI 2010) 10
  • 11. Internationalisation impact: selection of key areas• Quality • Relevance of education • Quality assurance systems• Equity • Access to education • Access to mobility• Domestic demand and brain drain • Asymmetric mobility 11
  • 12. Distribution of foreign students in tertiary education, by country of destination (2009) Other non-OECD countries 15.7 Other OECD United States countries 6.0 18.0 Sweden 1.1 Netherlands 1.2 Belgium 1.3 United Kingdom Switzerland 1.3 9.9 Korea 1.4 Austria 1.6 Australia 7.0 South Africa 1.7 China 1.7 Germany 7.0 Italy 1.8 New Zealand 1.9 France 6.8 Spain 2.3 Canada 5.2 Japan 3.6 Russian 12Percentage of foreign tertiary students (reported to the OECD) Federation 3.7who are enrolled in each country of destination
  • 13. Distribution of foreign students in tertiary education, by country of origin (2009) China, 16.5 India, 6.2 Korea, 3.8Other non-OECD Germany, 2.9 non-G20countries, 46.0 France, 1.6 United States, 1.6 Russian Federation, 1.6 Turkey, 1.4 Other non-OECD G20 Canada, 1.4 countries, 1.3 Other OECD Japan, 1.4 countries, 9.8 Italy, 1.3 Poland, 1.0 Saudi Indonesia, 1.1 Arabia, 1.0
  • 14. Percentage of international students changing status and staying on in selected OECD countries, 2008 or 2009 Percentage of students who have changed their status (whether for work, family or other reasons) among students who have not renewed their permits %35302520151050 Germany Norway Canada Austria Australia France Japan Ireland Netherlands Spain United Kingdom Finland Czech Republic New Zealand
  • 15. From impact to policy: balancing key options (institutional level)LOCAL CHAMPION Institutional mission McUNIVERSITY Relevance/LOCAL/REGIONAL quality of outcomes GLOBAL Programme/ ENRICH course design EXPORT Mihaylo Milovanovitch, OECD 15
  • 16. From impact to policy: balancing key options (public policy level) Academic/ ATTRACT student mobility SEND RESTRICTIVE Accreditation policy PROACTIVE System design CONVERGENCE/NATIONALISATION RECOGNITION Mihaylo Milovanovitch, OECD 16
  • 17. Managing internationalisation through institutional co-operation• Addressing the challenge to quality – Regional co-operation – Intra-institutional co-ordination – Internationalisation of QA• Addressing the challenge to equity – Credit transfer and convergence of systems for 0ptimising mobility• Attracting talent back – Diaspora mobilisation 17
  • 18. Managing internationalisation through institutional co-operation: examples• Bologna Process• Managing internationalisation: a new project by the OECD’s Institutional Management of Higher Education programme (IMHE).• AHELO – Assessment of Higher Education Learning Outcomes• CONAHEC• International Network of Quality Assurance Agencies in Higher Education (INQAAHE)• Partnerships for the Future - Portugal 18
  • 19. Suggestions for reading• Tertiary Education for the Knowledge Society (OECD 2008)• Brandenburg/de Witt (2011), The end of Internationalistation, International Higher Education, No. 62/2011• Marijk van der Wende, 2010, Quality Assurance in Higher Education and the Link to Internationalisation, CHEPS 2010, Netherlands• Indicator Projects on Internationalisation: Approaches, Methods and Findings - A report in the context of the European project “Indicators for Mapping & Profiling Internationalisation” (IMPI)• www.oecd.org/edu/ahelo• www.oecd.org/edu/imhe• conahec.org 19
  • 20. Thank you mihaylo.milovanovitch@oecd.orgwww.oecd.org/edu/nme