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Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
Key findings from the 2013 edition of  Education at a Glance - Andreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for Education
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Key findings from the 2013 edition of Education at a Glance - Andreas Schleicher Advisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education Policy Deputy Director for Education

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Some 10 years ago, we lived in a very different world in which education systems tended to be inward-looking , where schools and education systems typically considered themselves to be unique and to …

Some 10 years ago, we lived in a very different world in which education systems tended to be inward-looking , where schools and education systems typically considered themselves to be unique and to operate in a unique context that would not allow them to borrow on policies and practices developed elsewhere.

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  • 1. 11London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsAndreas SchleicherAdvisor of the OECD Secretary-General on Education PolicyDeputy Director for EducationKey findings from the 2013 edition ofEducation at a Glance
  • 2. 22London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsAcross the worldmore people obtain better qualificationsbut the pace of change varies hugely across countries
  • 3. 33London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsA world of change – higher education05,00010,00015,00020,00025,00030,0000 10 20 30 40 50 60 701995Expenditureperstudentattertiarylevel(USD)Tertiary-type A graduation rate (%)CostperstudentGraduate supply
  • 4. 44London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsA world of change – higher education05,00010,00015,00020,00025,00030,0000 10 20 30 40 50 60 701995Expenditureperstudentattertiarylevel(USD)Tertiary-type A graduation rate (%)CostperstudentGraduate supplyUnited States
  • 5. 55London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsA world of change – higher education05,00010,00015,00020,00025,00030,0000 10 20 30 40 50 60 702000Expenditureperstudentattertiarylevel(USD)Tertiary-type A graduation rateUnited Kingdom
  • 6. 66London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsA world of change – higher education05,00010,00015,00020,00025,00030,0000 10 20 30 40 50 60 702001Expenditureperstudentattertiarylevel(USD)Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  • 7. 77London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsA world of change – higher education05,00010,00015,00020,00025,00030,0000 10 20 30 40 50 60 702002Expenditureperstudentattertiarylevel(USD)Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  • 8. 88London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsA world of change – higher education05,00010,00015,00020,00025,00030,0000 10 20 30 40 50 60 702003Expenditureperstudentattertiarylevel(USD)Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  • 9. 99London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsA world of change – higher education05,00010,00015,00020,00025,00030,0000 10 20 30 40 50 60 702004Expenditureperstudentattertiarylevel(USD)Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  • 10. 1010London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsA world of change – higher education05,00010,00015,00020,00025,00030,0000 10 20 30 40 50 60 702005Expenditureperstudentattertiarylevel(USD)Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  • 11. 1111London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsA world of change – higher education05,00010,00015,00020,00025,00030,0000 10 20 30 40 50 60 702006Expenditureperstudentattertiarylevel(USD)Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  • 12. 1212London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsA world of change – higher education05,00010,00015,00020,00025,00030,0000 10 20 30 40 50 60 702007Expenditureperstudentattertiarylevel(USD)Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  • 13. 1313London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsA world of change – higher education05,00010,00015,00020,00025,00030,0000 10 20 30 40 50 60 702008Expenditureperstudentattertiarylevel(USD)Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  • 14. 1414London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsA world of change – higher education05,00010,00015,00020,00025,00030,0000 10 20 30 40 50 60 702009Expenditureperstudentattertiarylevel(USD)Tertiary-type A graduation rate
  • 15. 1515London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsA world of change – higher education05,00010,00015,00020,00025,00030,0000 10 20 30 40 50 60 702010Expenditureperstudentattertiarylevel(USD)Tertiary-type A graduation rateIcelandPolandUK
  • 16. 1616London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsA world of change – higher education05,00010,00015,00020,00025,00030,0000 10 20 30 40 50 60 702010Expenditureperstudentattertiarylevel(USD)Tertiary-type A graduation rateUS
  • 17. 1717London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsMore people are participating in education than ever beforeProportion of population with tertiary education, and difference in attainmentbetween 25-34 and 55-64 year-olds (2011)AUSAUSBELCABCHLCZEDNKESTFINFRAGERGRCHUNISLIRLISRITAJPNKORLUXMEXNLD NZLNORPOLPRTSVKSVNESPSWECHETURUKMUSABRARUS- 1001020304050600 10 20 30 40 50 60Proportion of 25-64 year-olds with tertiary educationOECDOECD averagePercentage pointsDifference between the 25-34 and 55-64 year-old populations with tertiary education.High attainment;decreasingadvantageLower attainment;catching upHigh attainment;IncreasingadvantageLow attainment;Getting furtherbehindChart A1.3Tertiary attainmentIncreasingadvantageDE
  • 18. 1818London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsAn increasing female advantageEU
  • 19. 1919London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsMore women than men earn a university-level degreeProportion of students who enter tertiary education and graduate with at least a firstdegree/qualification at this level, by gender (2011)0102030405060708090100JapanAustraliaSpain,DenmarkFinlandBelgium(Fl.)TurkeyNetherlandsCzechRepublicGermanyPolandEU21averagePortugalOECDaverageMexicoAustriaNorwayNewZealandHungaryUnitedStatesSwedenWomen Men%Chart A4.2EUUK
  • 20. 2020London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsMixed success ratesEU
  • 21. 2121London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013Keyfindings Less than 70% of students entering tertiary educationactually graduateProportion of students who enter tertiary education and graduate with at least a first degree0102030405060708090100JapanAustraliaDenmarkFranceSpainFinlandGermanyTurkeyBelgium(Fl.)NetherlandsCzechRepublicUnitedKingdomSlovakRepublicEU21averageOECDaveragePortugalMexicoAustriaPolandNewZealandNorwaySwedenUnitedStatesHungary%Chart A4.1US/EU
  • 22. 2424London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsThe crisis has amplifiedthe value of a good education
  • 23. 2525London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013Keyfindings A tertiary education is an advantage,particularly during an economic downturnUnemployment rates for 25-64 year-olds tertiary educated people (2005, 2008 and 2011)051015202530NorwayAustriaGermanySwitzerlandCzechRepublicNetherlandsAustraliaBrazilKoreaJapanBelgiumLuxembourgNewZealandRussianFederationSwedenIsraelUnitedKingdomHungaryFinlandIcelandPolandSloveniaOECDaverageMexicoFranceUnitedStatesCanadaDenmarkItalyEU21averageSlovakRepublicChileIrelandTurkeyEstoniaPortugalSpainGreece% 2011 2008 2005Chart A5.2-3
  • 24. 2727London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013Keyfindings Adults with no upper secondary educationsuffer even more in weak labour marketsUnemployment rates for 25-64 year-olds with below upper secondary education(2005, 2008 and 2011)051015202530KoreaMexicoChileBrazilNorwayNetherlandsAustraliaLuxembourgNewZealandAustriaIsraelIcelandSwitzerlandTurkeyDenmarkItalySwedenUnitedKingdomFinlandCanadaBelgiumOECDaverageSloveniaFrancePortugalGermanyRussianFederationEU21averageUnitedStatesPolandGreeceCzechRepublicIrelandHungaryEstoniaSpainSlovakRepublic% 2011 2008 2005Chart A5.2-1
  • 25. 2828London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013Keyfindings The private returns on an investment in tertiaryeducation are substantialPrivate costs and benefits for a man attaining tertiary education (2009)600 000 400 000 200 000 0 200 000 400 000 600 000 800 000 1 000 000Turkey 64177New Zealand 66357Greece 70128Denmark 72592Sweden 84239Norway 95465Belgium 116694Spain 118157Germany 132531Estonia 137268Japan 143018Netherlands 145886Israel 151443Australia 152564Italy 155346Korea 161173OECD average 162718Portugal 163882France 166155EU21 average 167528Finland 169020Canada 169217United Kingdom 180560Austria 187103Hungary 210381Slovak Republic 217086Slovenia 227191Poland 230630Czech Republic 277158Ireland 288543United States 364847Direct costForegone taxes on earningsIncome tax effectSocial contribution effectTransfers effectGross earnings benefitsUnemployment effectGrants effectChart A7.3 bisCosts BenefitsEquivalent USD
  • 26. 2929London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013Keyfindings The net public return on investment for a man in tertiaryeducation is over USD 100 000.Net private and public returns associated with a man attaining tertiary education (2009)0 50 000 100 000 150 000 200 000 250 000 300 000 350 000 400 000United StatesIrelandCzech RepublicPolandSloveniaSlovak RepublicHungaryAustriaUnited KingdomCanadaFinlandEU21 averageFrancePortugalOECD averageKoreaItalyAustraliaIsraelNetherlandsJapanEstoniaGermanySpainBelgiumNorwaySwedenDenmarkGreeceNew ZealandTurkeyEquivalent USDPrivate net returns Public net returnsChart A7.1
  • 27. 3030London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsUpper secondary education has become the normPercentage of 25-64 year-olds whose highest level of attainment is upper secondary or post-secondary non-tertiary education (2011)01020304050607080Czech…Slovak…PolandAustriaHungarySloveniaGermanyJapanEstoniaSwedenEU21averageUnitedStatesOECD…LuxembourgFinlandDenmarkSwitzerlandNorwayChileFranceItalyNewZealandGreeceKoreaRussian…NetherlandsIcelandCanadaUnited…IrelandBelgiumIsraelAustraliaBrazilSpainMexicoTurkeyPortugalUpper secondary or post-secondary non-tertiary (ISCED 3/4) with no distinction by orientationUpper secondary or post-secondary non-tertiary (ISCED 3/4) with general orientationUpper secondary or post-secondary non-tertiary (ISCED 3/4) with vocational orientation%Chart A1.2EU/USEurope now matches US qualificationlevels (among 55-64-year-olds it wasstill 25 percentage points behind)
  • 28. 3131London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013Keyfindings Often a vocationally oriented secondary education offersbetter insurance against unemployment than general educationUnemployment rates among 25-64 year-olds with vocational or general upper secondary or post-secondary non-tertiary education (2011)02468101214161820NorwaySwitzerlandAustriaNetherlandsAustraliaSwedenIcelandNewZealandBelgiumGermanyIsraelItalyDenmarkCanadaFinlandOECDaverageFranceHungarySloveniaTurkeyEU21averagePolandSlovakRepublicEstoniaIrelandSpainGreece%Vocational education at ISCED 3/4 level General education at ISCED 3/4 levelChart A5.3EU/US
  • 29. 3232London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsEducation also has important social outcomes
  • 30. 3333London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013Keyfindings Adults with a tertiary education are half as likely to be obeseas those with only a below upper secondary educationPercentage of adults who are obese, by educational attainment (2011)01020304050UnitedKingdomUnitedStatesNewZealandChileAustraliaCanadaIcelandHungaryCzechRepublicOECDaverageEstoniaSloveniaPolandGreeceEU21averageSlovakRepublicIsraelIrelandBelgiumNorwaySwedenTurkeyFranceAustriaSpainNetherlandsBelow upper secondary education Upper secondary education Tertiary education%Chart A8.1
  • 31. 3434London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013Keyfindings An individual with a higher level of educationis less likely to smokePercentage of adults who smoke, by educational attainment (2011)0102030405060GreeceChilePolandSpainCzechRepublicHungaryIsraelSlovakRepublicEstoniaEU21averageBelgiumNorwayOECDaverageNetherlandsSloveniaFranceIrelandAustriaUnitedStatesCanadaAustraliaIcelandNewZealandUnitedKingdomSwedenBelow upper secondary education Upper secondary education Tertiary education%Chart A8.2
  • 32. 3535London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsA worrying proportion of European youth areneither employed nor in education or trainingEU
  • 33. 3636London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsOn average across OECD countries, 8.2% of 15-19 year-oldswere neither in education nor employed in 2011(2.7% unemployed and 5.8% inactive),Percentage of 15-19 year-olds not in education and unemployed or not in the labour force (2011)051015202530354045TurkeyMexicoBrazilIsraelChileNewZealandAustraliaUnitedKingdomCanadaNorwaySpainItalyOECDaverageUnitedStatesPortugalAustriaIrelandSwitzerlandKoreaDenmarkNetherlandsSwedenGreeceEU21averageFranceBelgiumEstoniaIcelandFinlandSlovakRepublicGermanyCzechRepublicHungaryPolandLuxembourg%Not in education and not in the labour forceNot in education and unemployedNot in education (Total)Chart C5.2UK
  • 34. 3838London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsDespite the economic crisis, publicspending on education rose significantlyPublic expenditure on education as a percentage of total publicexpenditure grew by 9% – the third largest increase among OECDcountries after Australia (14%) and Iceland (13%)EU/UK
  • 35. 3939London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013Keyfindings Between 2008 and 2010, countries varied in the share oftotal public expenditure they allocated to educationIndex of change between 2008 and 2010 in public expenditure on education as a percentage oftotal public expenditure for all levels of education combined (2008=100, 2010 constant prices)80859095100105110115120125AustraliaIcelandUnitedKingdomSwitzerlandNewZealandIsraelChileKoreaDenmarkSwedenSlovakRepublicCzechRepublicAustriaPortugalOECDaverageFinlandEstoniaJapanFranceNetherlandsEU21averageSpainPolandSloveniaBelgiumItalyHungaryNorwayUnitedStatesBrazilMexicoIrelandIndex of changeChange in public expenditure on educationChange in public expenditure for all servicesChange in total public expenditure on education as a percentage of total public expenditureChart B4.2
  • 36. 4040London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013Keyfindings Between 2008 and 2010, only five countries cut publicexpenditure on educational institutionsIndex of change between 2008 and 2010 in expenditure on educational institutions as a percentageof GDP, for all levels of education (2008=100, 2010 constant prices)80859095100105110115120125AustraliaSlovakRepublicDenmarkIrelandPortugalFinlandNewZealandNetherlandsJapanUnitedKingdomCanadaCzechRepublicSloveniaMexicoSpainEU21averageAustriaOECDaverageNorwayKoreaFranceSwitzerlandSwedenEstoniaBelgiumIsraelUnitedStatesRussianFederationPolandIcelandItalyHungaryChileIndex of change(2008=100)Change in public expenditure on educational institutionsChange in Gross Domestic ProductChange in expenditure on education institutions as a percentage of GDPChart B2.3-1EU
  • 37. 4141London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013Keyfindings OECD countries spend USD 9 313 per student per yearon primary through tertiary educationIn equivalent USD converted using PPPs, based on full-time equivalents, for primary throughtertiary education02 0004 0006 0008 00010 00012 00014 00016 000UnitedStatesSwitzerlandNorwayDenmarkAustriaSwedenNetherlandsBelgiumUnitedKingdomAustraliaIrelandJapanFranceFinlandSpainEU21averageSloveniaOECDaverageItalyIcelandKoreaNewZealandPortugalIsraelPolandEstoniaCzechRepublicSlovakRepublicHungaryRussianFederationChileArgentinaBrazilMexicoIn equivalent USDconverted using PPPsTotalAncillary services (transport, meals, housing provided by institutions) and R&DCore servicesChart B1.1
  • 38. 4242London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsSpending per student at the tertiary levelAnnual expenditure per student by educational institutions for all services, by level of education (2010)02 0004 0006 0008 00010 00012 00014 00016 00018 00020 00022 00024 00026 00028 00030 000UnitedStatesSwitzerlandSwedenDenmarkNorwayNetherlandsFinlandJapanIrelandUnited…BelgiumAustraliaFranceAustriaSpainBrazilEU21averageIsraelPortugalNewZealandKoreaSloveniaItalyPolandHungaryIcelandMexicoCzech…ChileSlovak…EstoniaArgentinaExpenditure per student (equivalent USDconverted using PPPs)Tertiary educationChart B1.2-3EU
  • 39. 4343London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsBurden on householdsUK
  • 40. 4444London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013Keyfindings Some 16% of all spending on educational institutionscomes from private sourcesShare of private expenditure on educational institutions (2010)01020304050607080ChileUnitedKingdomKoreaJapanUnitedStatesAustraliaIsraelCanada1Russian…NewZealandItalyOECDaveragePortugalMexicoSlovakRepublicPolandNetherlandsEstoniaArgentinaEU21averageSpainCzechRepublicIrelandFranceSloveniaAustriaBelgiumSwedenIcelandDenmarkFinlandNorwaySwitzerlandLuxembourg%Primary, secondary and post-secondary non-tertiary educationTertiary educationChart B3.1
  • 41. 4545London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013Keyfindings The share of private expenditure on tertiary institutionsincreased from 24% in 2000 to 32% in 2010Share of private expenditure on tertiary educational institutions (2000, 2005 and 2010)0102030405060708090ChileUnitedKingdomKoreaJapanUnitedStatesAustraliaIsraelCanadaRussianFederationNewZealandItalyEU21averageOECDaveragePortugalMexicoSlovakRepublicPolandNetherlandsEstoniaArgentinaSpainCzechRepublicIrelandFranceSloveniaAustriaBelgiumSwedenIcelandDenmarkFinlandNorway%2010 2005 2000Chart B3.3
  • 42. 4646London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsThe early yearsEU
  • 43. 4747London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013Keyfindings Expenditure on pre-primary education accounts for anaverage of 0.6% of GDP.Expenditure on early childhood educational institutions as a percentage of GDP, by funding sources(2010)0.00.20.40.60.81.01.2DenmarkIcelandSpainIsraelRussianFederationLuxembourgSloveniaFranceSwedenHungaryPolandMexicoChileBelgiumNewZealandArgentinaEU21averageAustriaOECDaverageCzechRepublicNorwayUnitedStatesSlovakRepublicItalyEstoniaFinlandBrazilNetherlandsPortugalUnitedKingdomKoreaJapanSwitzerlandAustraliaPrivate expenditure on educational institutions in percentage of GDPPublic expenditure on educational institutions in percentage of GDPTotal% of GDPChart C2.3UK
  • 44. 4848London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013Keyfindings The ratio of pupils to teaching staff indicates the levelof resources devoted to pre-primary educationRatio of pupils to teaching staff in early childhood education in public and private institutions(2011)02468101214161820222426MexicoIsraelChinaTurkeyChileFranceIndonesiaUnitedKingdomBrazilKoreaBelgiumPolandPortugalJapanNetherlandsOECDaverageAustriaCzechRepublicUnitedStatesEU21averageSpainGermanySlovakRepublicItalyLuxembourgHungarySaudiArabiaFinlandSloveniaNewZealandEstoniaSwedenIcelandChildren to educational staff ratioChart C2.4UK/DE
  • 45. 4949London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsResources in schooling
  • 46. 5050London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsStudents in OECD countries receive an average of 7 751 hoursof instruction during primary and lower secondary education,most of which is compulsoryNumber of intended instruction hours in public institutions (2011)0 2 000 4 000 6 000 8 000 10 000 12 000AustraliaIrelandNetherlandsSpainLuxembourgIcelandIsraelFrancePortugalMexicoCanadaChileDenmarkEnglandNorwayOECD averageEU21 averageBelgium (Fr.)ItalyGermanyJapanIndonesiaSlovak RepublicGreeceBelgium (Fl.)AustriaFinlandSwedenPolandSloveniaCzech RepublicKoreaRussian FederationEstoniaHungaryTurkeyTotal number of intended instruction hoursCompulsory instruction time Non-compulsory instruction timeCompulsory instruction time Non-compulsory instruction timePrimary education Lower secondary educationChart D1.1UK
  • 47. 5151London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013Keyfindings On average in OECD countries, class size increases by two ormore students between primary and lower secondary educationAverage class size in educational institutions, by level of education (2011)0102030405060ChinaChileJapanIsraelKoreaTurkeyIndonesiaArgentinaUnitedKingdomBrazilIrelandAustraliaFranceSpainOECDaverageGermanyBelgium(Fr.)HungaryPortugalDenmarkUnitedStatesEU21averageCzechRepublicMexicoFinlandItalySloveniaPolandIcelandAustriaSlovakRepublicRussian…EstoniaGreeceLuxembourgNumber of studentsper classroomPrimary educationLower secondary educationChart D2.2
  • 48. 5252London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013Keyfindings In only 6 countries were relative salaries for teachershigher than those of comparably educated workersRatio of teachers salary to earnings for full-time, full-year workers with tertiary education aged25-64 (2011 or latest available year)0.00.51.01.5SpainKoreaLuxembourgPortugalNewZealandCanadaGermanyFinlandIsraelEnglandAustraliaDenmarkBelgium(Fl.)OECDaverageEU21averageNetherlandsBelgium(Fr.)IrelandSwedenSloveniaFranceScotlandPolandChileNorwayUnitedStatesEstoniaAustriaItalyHungaryCzechRepublicIcelandSlovakRepublicRatioChart D3.1-2EU/US
  • 49. 5353London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013Keyfindings Between 2009 and 2011, teachers’ salaries fell, for the firsttime since 2000, by around 2% at all levels of educationOECD average of the index of change between 2005 and 2011 (2000 = 100, constant prices),for teachers with 15 years of experience and minimum training1001051101151201251302005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011Primary level Lower secondary level Upper secondary levelIndex of changeChart Box_D3.1
  • 50. 5454London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsLooking elsewhere to study
  • 51. 5555London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013Keyfindings In 2011, more than 4.3 million students were enrolled intertiary education outside their country of citizenship.Evolution in the number of students enrolled outside their country of citizenship, by region ofdestination (2000 to 2011)0.00.51.01.52.02.53.03.54.04.52000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011Worldwide OECD G20 countries Europe North America OceaniaMillion studentsChart C4.1
  • 52. 5656London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsAustralia, Canada, France, Germany, the United Kingdom andthe United States together receive more than 50% of allforeign students worldwide.Percentage of all foreign tertiary students enrolled, by destination (2000, 2011)0510152025UnitedStatesUnitedKingdomGermanyFranceAustraliaCanadaRussianFederationJapanSpainSouthAfricaChinaItalyNewZealandAustriaKoreaSwitzerlandNetherlandsBelgiumOtherOECDOtherG0andnon-OECD2000 2011Marketshare (%)Chart C4.3
  • 53. 5757London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013Keyfindings At least 15% of tertiary enrolments in Australia, Austria, NewZealand, Switzerland and the United Kingdom are internationalInternational or foreign student enrolment as a percentage of total tertiary enrolment (2011)05101520AustraliaUnitedKingdomSwitzerlandNewZealandAustriaBelgiumSwedenDenmarkCanada¹IrelandIcelandNetherlandsFinlandHungarySlovakRepublicJapanUnitedStatesPortugalSpainEstoniaSloveniaNorwayPolandChileFranceCzechRepublicSouthAfrica¹GreeceItalySaudiArabiaRussianFederationKoreaIsraelTurkeyChinaBrazilForeign students2%International studentsOECD averageChart C4.4
  • 54. 5858London,24June2013AndreasSchleicherEducationataGlance2013KeyfindingsThank you ! www.oecd.org/education/eag.htm Andreas.Schleicher@OECD.org Twitter: SchleicherEDU… and remember:Without data, you are just another personwith an opinion

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