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Factors influencing an efficient entrance in higher education - Jo Breda
 

Factors influencing an efficient entrance in higher education - Jo Breda

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  • No more quick wins, more democratisation / more underrepresented groups, we need all the talent available
  • On the one hand there are large differences according to the sort of trajectory folowed in secondary education, seams like a likely candidate to make transit from SO to HO more efficient but: if seen as a predictive test very bad. No general school leaving exam, differences between schools not only differences between trajectories. On the other hand
  • On the one hand there are large differences according to the sort of trajectory folowed in secondary education, seams like a likely candidate to make transit from SO to HO more efficient but: if seen as a predictive test very bad. On the other hand
  • Entrance exam or what Edwards ‘2012 in Higher education management and policy’ calls admission test (aptitude or achievement tests) according to his overview these test are prevalent in developed countries. Now no entrance exams or admission tests – more precisely: no general test, but medicine and fine art courses have an admission test, and before also for the enineering courses: those have higher success rates. Edwards 2012 lists 3 reasons for caution: sometimes there is a lack of available evidence, biases, burden on institutions and cost for applicants. + still failure for individual student without remedy + scare off some possible candidates. + in flanders already a high level of participation, focus on underrepresented groups who often suffer from biases.
  • Entrance exam or what Edwards ‘2012 in Higher education management and policy’ calls admission test (aptitude or achievement tests) according to his overview these test are prevalent in developed countries. Now no entrance exams or admission tests – more precisely: no general test, but medicine and fine art courses have an admission test, and before also for the enineering courses: those have higher success rates. Edwards 2012 lists 3 reasons for caution: sometimes there is a lack of available evidence, biases, burden on institutions and cost for applicants. + still failure for individual student without remedy + scare off some possible candidates. + in flanders already a high level of participation, focus on underrepresented groups who often suffer from biases.
  • Entrance exam or what Edwards ‘2012 in Higher education management and policy’ calls admission test (aptitude or achievement tests) according to his overview these test are prevalent in developed countries. Number of pro’s: comparablility over different schools, more than schoolresults; attempting to identify greater numbers of canditates from underrepresented groups whose socio-economic background might influence their secondary school outcomes (maar dat heeft ook effect op admission tests), giving people further insights on what they are capable of, complement achievement scores by academic aptitude tests. Now no entrance exams or admission tests – more precisely: no general test, but medicine and fine art courses have an admission test, and before also for the enineering courses: those have higher success rates. Edwards 2012 lists 3 reasons for caution: sometimes there is a lack of available evidence, biases, burden on institutions and cost for applicants. + still failure for individual student without remedy + scare off some possible candidates. + in flanders already a high level of participation, focus on underrepresented groups who often suffer from biases.
  • Entrance exam or what Edwards ‘2012 in Higher education management and policy’ calls admission test (aptitude or achievement tests) according to his overview these test are prevalent in developed countries. Now no entrance exams or admission tests – more precisely: no general test, but medicine and fine art courses have an admission test, and before also for the enineering courses: those have higher success rates. Edwards 2012 lists 3 reasons for caution: sometimes there is a lack of available evidence, biases, burden on institutions and cost for applicants. + still failure for individual student without remedy + scare off some possible candidates. + in flanders already a high level of participation, focus on underrepresented groups who often suffer from biases.
  • Entrance exam or what Edwards ‘2012 in Higher education management and policy’ calls admission test (aptitude or achievement tests) according to his overview these test are prevalent in developed countries. Now no entrance exams or admission tests – more precisely: no general test, but medicine and fine art courses have an admission test, and before also for the enineering courses: those have higher success rates. Edwards 2012 lists 3 reasons for caution: sometimes there is a lack of available evidence, biases, burden on institutions and cost for applicants. + still failure for individual student without remedy + scare off some possible candidates. + in flanders already a high level of participation, focus on underrepresented groups who often suffer from biases.
  • Entrance exam or what Edwards ‘2012 in Higher education management and policy’ calls admission test (aptitude or achievement tests) according to his overview these test are prevalent in developed countries. Now no entrance exams or admission tests – more precisely: no general test, but medicine and fine art courses have an admission test, and before also for the enineering courses: those have higher success rates. Edwards 2012 lists 3 reasons for caution: sometimes there is a lack of available evidence, biases, burden on institutions and cost for applicants. + still failure for individual student without remedy + scare off some possible candidates. + in flanders already a high level of participation, focus on underrepresented groups who often suffer from biases.
  • Entrance exam or what Edwards ‘2012 in Higher education management and policy’ calls admission test (aptitude or achievement tests) according to his overview these test are prevalent in developed countries. Now no entrance exams or admission tests – more precisely: no general test, but medicine and fine art courses have an admission test, and before also for the enineering courses: those have higher success rates. Edwards 2012 lists 3 reasons for caution: sometimes there is a lack of available evidence, biases, burden on institutions and cost for applicants. + still failure for individual student without remedy + scare off some possible candidates. + in flanders already a high level of participation, focus on underrepresented groups who often suffer from biases.
  • Now: low tuition, the loss of possible salary is not salient for all students, encourages ‘trying’. If students were economically rational thinkers, increasing the initial investment might raise commitment. But economic models have limited explanotory power in Kuh 2006, but also other speaker Ross Finnie. Chenn (2011): students from a high socio-economic background have 55% higher odds of persisting than their peers from a low socio-economic background; might be a cultural issue (higher socio-economic is ofthen higher educated and those parents can give more support / mirer more the benifits)
  • Other tools are circumstantial, this is the core buisiness of universities. Kuh 2006: student engagement in the programme en the institution seems to be a crucial element. Especially in the starting phase of study programmes, feedback can be very important for development and persistence.
  • Support for chosing a study programme, prerequisites, feedback, some remedial actions, (but recruitement en councilling are interwined)
  • Flemish universities invest a lot in these actions, but they have a limited effect
  • So I am going to keep this choice. But I am going to complement this with earlier actions of the same kind: What if secondary education would prepare more for higher education? After all, nowadays 40 % striving for almost 50% of pupils will go to higher education. Not preparation content wise, but working around motivation, learning capacity etc all toghether: orienting pupils towards higher education
  • Foretaste helping motivation and clarification of interest and competencies
  • Conclusion: flemish universities are prepared to invest even more in the quality of the learning environment for new students, but ask for secondary e
  • Conclusion: I have not deleted the first three tools, but flemish universities focus on investing in individual people, including as many as possible in a trajectory focused on remedy as a means to further even more the number of higher educated people. The Flemish universities are prepared to invest even more in the quality of the learning environment for new students, but ask for secondary education to make higher education more salient for pupils, to motivate them, to foster realistic expectations, and to make them better prepared for higher education: to enduce a culture of study

Factors influencing an efficient entrance in higher education - Jo Breda Factors influencing an efficient entrance in higher education - Jo Breda Presentation Transcript

  • Factors influencing an efficiententrance in higher educationJo BredaFlemish Interuniversity Council
  • 2
  • Ambition 44,9% 47,8% 2010 In 2020 3
  • Current tools 44,9% 47,8% 2010 In 2020 No selection (+/-) Low financial obstacles 4
  • Efficient? 44,9% 47,8% 2010 In 2020 No selection Low success rate (+/-) Low financial obstacles 5
  • Other tools? Secondary school achievement 6
  • Other tools? Secondary school achievement Large differences? 7
  • Other tools? Secondary school achievement Large differences? Earlier choices more dictated by home culture? 8
  • Other tools? Secondary school achievement 9
  • Other tools? Secondary school achievement Entrance exam 10
  • Other tools? Entrance exam Higher success rate 11
  • Other tools? Entrance exam Higher success rate No remedy 12
  • Other tools? Entrance exam Higher success rate No remedy Scares off some candidates 13
  • Other tools? Entrance exam Higher success rate No remedy Scares off some Biases candidates 14
  • Other tools? Secondary school achievement Entrance exam 15
  • Other tools? Secondary school achievement Entrance exam Tuition fee 16
  • Other tools? Tuition fee Raise commitment? 17
  • Other tools? Secondary school achievement Entrance exam Tuition fee Quality of study environment 18
  • Other tools? Before: information, summer courses, … Quality of study environment 19
  • Other tools? Before: information, summer courses, … At start: counselling, remedy on academic skills like learning methods en Quality of study environment language 20
  • Other tools? Before: information, summer courses, … At start: counselling, remedy on academic skills like learning methods and academic language usage Quality of study environment … During first semester: feeback, monitoring and counselling… 21
  • Other tools? Secondary school achievement Entrance exam Tuition fee Quality of study environment Stronger orientation towards higher education 22
  • Other tools? Clarification of interest, competencies and motivation Stronger orientation towards higher education 23
  • Other tools? Clarification of interest, competencies and motivation Focus on remedy Stronger orientation towards higher education 24
  • Other tools? Secondary school achievement Entrance exam Tuition fee Quality of study environment Stronger orientation towards higher education 25