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Better skills, better jobs,
better lives

OECD EMPLOYER
BRAND
Playbook

Andreas Schleicher
5 February 2014

1
Problem solving skills
in a digital environment
Young adults (16-24 year-olds)

All adults (16-65 year-olds)

Sweden
Finla...
Evolution of employment in occupational groups
defined by problem-solving skills
%
25
20

Medium-low
level of
problem-solv...
4

PISA in brief
• Over half a million students…
– representing 28 million 15-year-olds in 65 countries/economies

… took ...
High mathematics performance
Mean score … Shanghai-China performs above this line (613)
580

Singapore

570
560

Chinese T...
High mathematics performance

Singapore
Chinese Taipei

Hong Kong-China

Average performance
of 15-year-olds in
mathematic...
2012

Shanghai-China
Singapore
Singapore
Chinese Taipei
Chinese Taipei

Hong Kong-China

Hong Kong-China
Korea

Macao-Chin...
Australia
Austria
Belgium
Canada
Chile
Czech Rep.
Denmark
Estonia
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Hungary
Iceland
Ireland
Is...
Australia
Austria
Belgium
Canada
Chile
Czech Rep.
Denmark
Estonia
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Hungary
Iceland
Ireland
Is...
Contribution of various factors to upper secondary teacher
compensation costs, per student as a percentage of GDP per capi...
Australia
Austria
Belgium
Canada
Chile
Czech Rep.
Denmark
Estonia
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Hungary
Iceland
Ireland
Is...
Australia
Austria
Belgium
Canada
Chile
Czech Rep.
Denmark
Estonia
Finland
France
Germany
Greece
Hungary
Iceland
Ireland
Is...
13

The American dream of social mobility
In some countries it is close to a reality
10

Shanghai-China
Hong Kong-China
Macao-China
Viet Nam
Singapore
Korea
Chinese Taipei
Japan
Liechtenstein
Switzerland
Est...
High impact on outcomes

15
15

Quick wins

Lessons from high performers

Must haves

Catching up with the top-performers
...
High impact on outcomes

16
16

Quick wins

Must haves

Lessons from high performers

Commitment to universal achievement
...
Find out more about PISA at www.pisa.oecd.org
• All national and international publications
• The complete micro-level dat...
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PISA and Skills Outlook - Parliamentary Days 2014

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Skills have become the global currency of 21st century economies. Without sufficient investment in skills people languish on the margins of society, technological progress does not translate into productivity growth, and countries can no longer compete in an increasingly knowledge-based global economy. And, at a time when growing economic and social inequalities are a major challenge, effective skills policies must be part of any response to address this challenge. But this ‘currency’ depreciates as skill requirements of labour markets evolve and individuals lose the skills they do not use. For skills to retain their value, they must be continuously maintained and upgraded throughout life so that people can collaborate, compete and connect in ways that drive economies forward.
With its skill assessment programmes PISA and PIAAC, the OECD has developed global metrics not only to assess the quality and quantity of the skills available in the population, but also to help policy-makers determine and anticipate the skills required in the labour market; develop and deploy those skills in the most effective and equitable ways; and establish sustainable approaches to who should pay for what, when and how. By Andreas Schleicher, OECD Deputy Director and Special Advisor on Education Policy to the Secretary-General, Directorate for Education and Skills.

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Transcript of "PISA and Skills Outlook - Parliamentary Days 2014"

  1. 1. Better skills, better jobs, better lives OECD EMPLOYER BRAND Playbook Andreas Schleicher 5 February 2014 1
  2. 2. Problem solving skills in a digital environment Young adults (16-24 year-olds) All adults (16-65 year-olds) Sweden Finland Netherlands Norway Denmark Australia Canada Germany England/N. Ireland (UK) Japan Flanders (Belgium) Average Czech Republic Austria United States Korea Estonia Slovak Republic Ireland Poland % 100 Basic digital problem-solving skills Advanced digital problemsolving skills 80 60 40 20 0 20 40 60 80 100 2
  3. 3. Evolution of employment in occupational groups defined by problem-solving skills % 25 20 Medium-low level of problem-solving 15 10 5 0 Low level of problem-solving -5 -10 -15 -20 Medium-high level of problem-solving 3
  4. 4. 4 PISA in brief • Over half a million students… – representing 28 million 15-year-olds in 65 countries/economies … took an internationally agreed 2-hour test… – Goes beyond testing whether students can reproduce what they were taught… … to assess students’ capacity to extrapolate from what they know and creatively apply their knowledge in novel situations – Mathematics, reading, science, problem-solving, financial literacy – Total of 390 minutes of assessment material … and responded to questions on… – their personal background, their schools and their engagement with learning and school • Parents, principals and system leaders provided data on… – school policies, practices, resources and institutional factors that help explain performance differences .
  5. 5. High mathematics performance Mean score … Shanghai-China performs above this line (613) 580 Singapore 570 560 Chinese Taipei Korea 550 540 Macao-China Japan Liechtenstein Switzerland 530 520 510 500 490 480 470 Hong Kong-China Poland Belgium Germany Austria Slovenia New Zealand Denmark France Czech Republic Latvia Luxembourg Portugal Spain Slovak Republic United States Connecticut Hungary Massachusetts Florida Netherlands Estonia Finland Canada Viet Nam Australia Ireland United Kingdom Iceland Norway Italy Russian Fed. Lithuania Sweden Croatia Israel 460 450 Greece Serbia Turkey Romania 440 430 420 410 Chile … 12 countries perform below this line Bulgaria U.A.E. Kazakhstan Thailand Malaysia Mexico Low mathematics performance Average performance of 15-year-olds in Mathematics Fig I.2.13
  6. 6. High mathematics performance Singapore Chinese Taipei Hong Kong-China Average performance of 15-year-olds in mathematics Korea Macao-China Japan Liechtenstein Switzerland Strong socio-economic impact on student performance Poland Belgium Germany Austria Slovenia New Zealand Denmark France Czech Republic Latvia Luxembourg Portugal Spain Slovak Republic United States Hungary Netherlands Estonia Finland Canada Viet Nam Australia Ireland United Kingdom Iceland Norway Italy Russian Fed. Lithuania Sweden Croatia Israel Greece Serbia Turkey Romania Chile Bulgaria U.A.E. Kazakhstan Thailand Malaysia Mexico Low mathematics performance Socially equitable distribution of learning opportunities
  7. 7. 2012 Shanghai-China Singapore Singapore Chinese Taipei Chinese Taipei Hong Kong-China Hong Kong-China Korea Macao-China Japan Switzerland Switzerland Liechtenstein Korea Japan Liechtenstein Estonia Macao-China Netherlands Netherlands Estonia Poland Poland Canada Canada Belgium Belgium Finland FinlandViet Nam Viet Nam Germany Germany Strong socio-economic Socially equitable Austria Denmark Austria DenmarkAustralia Australia New ZealandNew Zealand impact on student Slovenia Ireland Ireland Slovenia distribution of learning Iceland Iceland Czech Rep. Czech Rep. performance 22France 18 opportunities France UK 26 24 20 1816 16 14UK14 12 12 10 10 0 24 22 20 8 8 6 6 44 22 0 Latvia Latvia Luxembourg Norway Luxembourg Norway Portugal Portugal Italy Italy Russian Fed. Russian Fed. US US Spain Lithuania Spain Lithuania Sweden Sweden Slovak Rep. Slovak Rep.Hungary Hungary Croatia Croatia Israel Israel Bulgaria Chile Greece Greece Serbia Serbia Turkey Turkey Romania Romania Bulgaria United Arab Emirates United Arab Emirates Kazakhstan Thailand Chile Malaysia Malaysia Mexico Kazakhstan Thailand Mexico
  8. 8. Australia Austria Belgium Canada Chile Czech Rep. Denmark Estonia Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Iceland Ireland Israel socio-economic Strong Italy impact on student Japan performance Korea Luxembourg Mexico Slovak Rep. Netherlands New Zealand Norway Poland Portugal Slovak Rep. Slovenia Spain Sweden Switzerland Turkey UK US 2012 Korea Japan Switzerland Netherlands Poland Belgium Germany Estonia Canada Finland Socially equitable Austria Australia New Zealand Denmark Ireland Slovenia distribution of learning Iceland Czech Rep. opportunities France UK Luxembourg Norway Portugal Italy US Spain Sweden Hungary Israel Greece Turkey Chile Mexico
  9. 9. Australia Austria Belgium Canada Chile Czech Rep. Denmark Estonia Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Iceland Ireland Israel Italy Japan Korea Luxembourg Mexico Slovak Rep. Netherlands New Zealand Norway Poland Portugal Slovak Rep. Slovenia Spain Sweden Switzerland Turkey UK US Korea Japan Switzerland Netherlands Poland Belgium Germany Estonia Canada Finland Austria Australia New Zealand Denmark Ireland Slovenia Iceland Czech Rep. France UK Luxembourg Norway Portugal Italy US Spain Sweden Hungary Israel Greece Turkey Chile Mexico
  10. 10. Contribution of various factors to upper secondary teacher compensation costs, per student as a percentage of GDP per capita (2004) Salary as % of GDP/capita Instruction time 1/teaching time 1/class size Difference with OECD average 15 Percentage points 10 5 0 -5 Slovak Republic Poland United States Sweden Finland Mexico Ireland Iceland Norway Hungary Czech Republic Austria Italy Denmark Netherlands France New Zealand United Kingdom Australia Japan Greece Germany Luxembourg Korea Belgium Switzerland Spain Portugal -10
  11. 11. Australia Austria Belgium Canada Chile Czech Rep. Denmark Estonia Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Iceland Ireland Israel Italy Japan Korea Luxembourg Mexico Slovak Rep. Netherlands New Zealand Norway Poland Portugal Slovak Rep. Slovenia Spain Sweden Switzerland Turkey UK US Korea Japan Switzerland Netherlands Poland Belgium Germany Estonia Canada Finland Austria Australia New Zealand Denmark Ireland Slovenia Iceland Czech Rep. France UK Luxembourg Norway Portugal Italy US Spain Sweden Hungary Israel Greece Turkey Chile Mexico
  12. 12. Australia Austria Belgium Canada Chile Czech Rep. Denmark Estonia Finland France Germany Greece Hungary Iceland Ireland Israel Italy Japan Korea Luxembourg Mexico Slovak Rep. Netherlands New Zealand Norway Poland Portugal Slovak Rep. Slovenia Spain Sweden Switzerland Turkey UK US Shanghai 2003 - 2012 Singapore Singapore Korea Japan Switzerland Netherlands Poland Belgium Germany Estonia Canada Finland Austria Australia New Zealand Denmark Ireland Slovenia Iceland Czech Rep. France UK Luxembourg Norway Portugal Italy US Spain Sweden Hungary Israel Greece Turkey Chile Mexico
  13. 13. 13 The American dream of social mobility In some countries it is close to a reality
  14. 14. 10 Shanghai-China Hong Kong-China Macao-China Viet Nam Singapore Korea Chinese Taipei Japan Liechtenstein Switzerland Estonia Netherlands Poland Canada Finland Belgium Portugal Germany Turkey OECD average Italy Spain Latvia Ireland Australia Thailand Austria Luxembourg Czech Republic Slovenia United Kingdom Lithuania France Norway Iceland New Zealand Russian Fed. United States Croatia Denmark Sweden Hungary Slovak Republic Mexico Serbia Greece Israel Tunisia Romania Malaysia Indonesia Bulgaria Kazakhstan Uruguay Brazil Costa Rica Chile Colombia Montenegro U.A.E. Argentina Jordan Peru Qatar 14 Percentage of resilient students % 40 30 More than 40 % resilient Fig II.2.4 80 70 60 50 Socio-economically disadvantaged students not only score lower in mathematics, they also report lower levels of engagement, drive, motivation and self-beliefs. Resilient students break this link and share many characteristics of advantaged highachievers. 20 Between 20%-40% of resilient students Less than 20% 0
  15. 15. High impact on outcomes 15 15 Quick wins Lessons from high performers Must haves Catching up with the top-performers Low feasibility High feasibility Money pits Low hanging fruits Low impact on outcomes
  16. 16. High impact on outcomes 16 16 Quick wins Must haves Lessons from high performers Commitment to universal achievement Capacity at point of delivery Resources where they yield most Gateways, instructional systems Coherence A learning system Low feasibility High feasibility Incentive structures and accountability Money pits Low hanging fruits Low impact on outcomes
  17. 17. Find out more about PISA at www.pisa.oecd.org • All national and international publications • The complete micro-level database Thank you ! Email: Andreas.Schleicher@OECD.org Twitter: SchleicherEDU and remember: Without data, you are just another person with an opinion
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