ODI Knowledge Policy and Power event presentation Harry Jones

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Exploration of the 'Knowledge, Policy and Power in International Development: a practical guide' book through the context of Nepal

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  • Research on the policy process Talk about the approach we’re using ...useful for understanding
  • PEA is used to understand reform processes, p-m, national balance of power Incentives: e.g. A prevailing perspective that political parties engage in pp not to try and solve ‘policy problems’ but to capture resources and maximise their own power Institutions: e.g. Structure of CA and Ministries, gives certain spaces for influence on policy Structures: e.g. Historical patterns of wealth and deprivation in the country Point is: power battles, bargaining and negotiation and politics, NOT analysis and problem-solving
  • PEA is used to understand reform processes, p-m, national balance of power Incentives: e.g. A prevailing perspective that political parties engage in pp not to try and solve ‘policy problems’ but to capture resources and maximise their own power Institutions: e.g. Structure of CA and Ministries, gives certain spaces for influence on policy Structures: e.g. Historical patterns of wealth and deprivation in the country Point is: power battles, bargaining and negotiation and politics, NOT analysis and problem-solving
  • Dimensions which shape policy making on an issue, or in a country Actors: interests, values and beliefs, and credibility+capacities Political context: e.g. Level of competition, decentralisation shapes opps+cons’s for knowledge Knowledge: role of research-based, practical and citizen knowledge KI processes: how links between K and P are ‘wired’, dissemination, consulting, collaboration, CB etc
  • Dimensions which shape policy making on an issue, or in a country Actors: interests, values and beliefs, and credibility+capacities Political context: e.g. Level of competition, decentralisation shapes opps+cons’s for knowledge Knowledge: role of research-based, practical and citizen knowledge KI processes: how links between K and P are ‘wired’, dissemination, consulting, collaboration, CB etc
  • INTEREST GROUP: This involves the competition of well-organised rival groups. Policy making takes place largely behind the scenes, in informal meetings and networks, or in closed spaces. Decision makers being forced to take sides, with shifting alliances and bargaining, with incremental changes rather than major confrontations, won depending on the energy and strength of groups. CLIENT: Small groups benefit directly from policies where the general public is often the loser. Well-organised clients can secure political support largely in private; those who stand to lose out are often unaware of the issue, or hard to organise. politicians using government spending to reward their constituents ENTREPRENEURIAL: very broad groups in society, are pitted against concentrated special interests. This is likely to involve political entrepreneurs identifying opportunities and bringing together a large coalition of beneficiaries, framing issues to capture the public imagination. Examples : environmental standards on companies. MAJORITARIAN: policy making is more likely to play out in public fora such as legislative debates or policy debates around an election. The public debate often addresses questions of whether social benefits exceed the costs, and basic ideological beliefs and values may come into play, in potentially partisan dialogues.
  • INTEREST GROUP: This involves the competition of well-organised rival groups. Policy making takes place largely behind the scenes, in informal meetings and networks, or in closed spaces. Decision makers being forced to take sides, with shifting alliances and bargaining, with incremental changes rather than major confrontations, won depending on the energy and strength of groups. CLIENT: Small groups benefit directly from policies where the general public is often the loser. Well-organised clients can secure political support largely in private; those who stand to lose out are often unaware of the issue, or hard to organise. politicians using government spending to reward their constituents ENTREPRENEURIAL: very broad groups in society, are pitted against concentrated special interests. This is likely to involve political entrepreneurs identifying opportunities and bringing together a large coalition of beneficiaries, framing issues to capture the public imagination. Examples : environmental standards on companies. MAJORITARIAN: policy making is more likely to play out in public fora such as legislative debates or policy debates around an election. The public debate often addresses questions of whether social benefits exceed the costs, and basic ideological beliefs and values may come into play, in potentially partisan dialogues.
  • INTEREST GROUP: This involves the competition of well-organised rival groups. Policy making takes place largely behind the scenes, in informal meetings and networks, or in closed spaces. Decision makers being forced to take sides, with shifting alliances and bargaining, with incremental changes rather than major confrontations, won depending on the energy and strength of groups. CLIENT: Small groups benefit directly from policies where the general public is often the loser. Well-organised clients can secure political support largely in private; those who stand to lose out are often unaware of the issue, or hard to organise. politicians using government spending to reward their constituents ENTREPRENEURIAL: very broad groups in society, are pitted against concentrated special interests. This is likely to involve political entrepreneurs identifying opportunities and bringing together a large coalition of beneficiaries, framing issues to capture the public imagination. Examples : environmental standards on companies. MAJORITARIAN: policy making is more likely to play out in public fora such as legislative debates or policy debates around an election. The public debate often addresses questions of whether social benefits exceed the costs, and basic ideological beliefs and values may come into play, in potentially partisan dialogues.
  • Policy making different from issue to issue, Will help you engage in that issue, understand how to work towards preferred outcomes or to improve PM on it 2. Country-wide structures, landscape of the knowledge-policy interface, improve ‘governance’ and policy making
  • ODI Knowledge Policy and Power event presentation Harry Jones

    1. 1. Knowledge, Policy and PowerUnderstanding the role of context and actors in the Nepal petroleum sector ‘Knowledge, Policy and Power in International Development’ European Book launch 1st May 2012 Harry Jones (ODI, RAPID)
    2. 2. Study context‘Prospecting policy issues’ for the Nepal Centre for Inclusive Growth (CIG)• Sector analysis and policy options• Institutional arrangements• Knowledge-policy interfaceHas been used to:• Select policy issues for CIG engagement• Identify entry points, opportunities & risks for CIG projects
    3. 3. Petroleum in Nepal
    4. 4. Petroleum in Nepal: 3 issueso Nepal – India import regime £40M p.a  Bad deal for Nepal £100Mo Price setting p.a  De facto subsidy £10-50Mo Petrol supply chains  Corruption, theft and inefficiency
    5. 5. Knowledge, policy and powerKey dimensions:• Political context• Actors• Knowledge (different types)• Knowledge interaction processes
    6. 6. Political contextDimension Price setting Supply chainCapacity to Turmoil & instabilityabsorb changeInformal political Elite subsidy Syndicates andrelationships patronageSeparation of Power of cabinet Many oversightstate powers bodies for NOCExternal forces South Asian petrol subsidiesFormal political Lack of localparticipation elections
    7. 7. Actors: spread of interests Price setting Supply chain
    8. 8. Actors: interests vs. values Supply chain Price setting
    9. 9. Actors: credibility and values Supply chain Price setting
    10. 10. Implications?What is this useful for?• Guides policy engagement and dialogue, highlights sub-issues and windows• Highlights topics and key actors for knowledge/research to influence change• Guidance for policy-making, especially for knowledge-based tools
    11. 11. Thank youh.jones@odi.org.uk
    12. 12. ODI is the UK’s leading independent think tank oninternational development and humanitarian issues.We aim to inspire and inform policy and practice toreduce poverty by locking together high-qualityapplied research and practical policy advice.The views presented here are those of the speaker,and do not necessarily represent the views of ODI orour partners. 111 Westminster Bridge Road, London, SE1 7JD T: +44 207 9220 300 www.odi.org.uk h.jones@odi.org.uk

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