Expanding the reach of OERs throughProfessional, Statutory and RegulatoryBodies (PSRBs)Professor Stephen Gomez, Alex Fenlo...
Barriers to uptake of OERs Freely available Unregulated Can be produced by anyone Can be altered by anyone ‘Pedigree...
3Higher Education Academy(HEA)http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/
3 years of HEFCE funding~£13million(182,000,000,000 rupiah)3 phases, multiple calls perphase; 115+ projects.66 different i...
Phase 1 2009 – 2010 £5.7milDevelopment of resources for teachers, practitioners andstudents, and the exploration of effect...
UKOER3 JISC Academy ukoer 3 themes and focus areas —Lou McGillhttp://www.wordle.net/show/wrdl/4776236/ukoer3
One theme - Professional, Statutory and RegulatoryBodies (PSRBs) Aims Promote OP with PSRBs & Subject Associations; Fa...
 Association for the Study of Medical Education (ASME)- Promoting open approaches in medicine. Royal Society of Chemistr...
 Increased an understanding of OP in medicine; Created a portfolio of scenarios where OP has beenadopted; Highlighted c...
 Need to develop more effective policies &procedures, especially around copyright & licencing; Organisations have limite...
 Projects increased awareness & understanding of OERacross a range of disciplines.  to the systematic collation of good...
 What are your experiences around perception of qualityassurance of open materials? What is your view of using professio...
Professor Stephen GomezHEA Academic Lead - Online LearningStephen.Gomez@heacademy.ac.uk@profgomez13Further information
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OCWC Global Conference 2013: Expanding the reach of OERs through Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Bodies (PSRBs)

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Professor Stephen Gomez, Alex Fenton & Dr. Rebekah Southern
The Higher Education Academy

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  • Association for the Study of Medical Education - Promoting open approaches with the UK PSRB/subject associations in medicine.Royal Society of Chemistry - Higher Education Learn Chemistry projectRoyal College of Veterinary Surgeons Charitable Trust - Aiding the Transition from Veterinary School to PracticeRoyal Geographical Society (with IB) - OER: Facilitating and catalysing uptake in GeographySociety of Biology - Promoting OER in bioscience Higher Education.
  • Developed and increased the baseline understanding of open approaches in PSRB/SA and charitable organisations, primarily in medicine. The final report suggests that in some cases there has been a significant increase in understanding within specific organisations;  Created a portfolio of scenarios where open approaches can be adopted by the PSRB/SA, subject to approval by the relevant internal processes. As lead organisation ASME’s executive committee has signed off some changes to their own practice and it is thought that other partners have done the same based on the content of their original collaboration agreement; Highlighted current best practice within each organisation that can be shared for the benefit of other PSRB/SA in different academic and professional fields. This has been maximised with support from the external copyright consultant; Increased the authority with which partners are able to lead discussions on the adoption of new policies and work procedures with their own members, contacts, affiliated organisations and contracted parties; and, Provided an understanding and knowledge of open content and access approaches - and their associated issues - to enable greater participation in national debate and policy development.
  • The case studies developed by the project have highlighted that generally there is a need to develop more effective policies and procedures to help potential stakeholders understand copyright and licensing. Most organisations were found to have a limited knowledge of open approaches including tools such as Creative Commons. This has increased through the project and there is an expectation that organisational understanding will continue to grow and indeed spiral.  The final report also highlights that it was not always straightforward to consistently identify the owners of web-based materials; and that it was unclear on occasions how educational resources and materials could be used (paper/hardcopy and electronic). There was variation in statements of ownership and whether materials could be copied or not, even within an organisation, depending on the type/format of resource and legal advice being given at the time of publication. Few of the resources referred to updated polices elsewhere (such as on website pages), meaning that the guidance for use/re-use of previously published works were difficult to retrospectively change or update. Additionally, particularly for electronic resources, the actual materials usually did not have anything embedded to explain how the resources could be used. This means once the resources are removed from the host website there is no mechanism to inform future potential users. The project also uncovered other issues around open practice for membership based organisations. There are fundamental questions around what to share more openly and what to keep for the benefit of members and this is of particular relevance for those that are commercially dependent upon membership fees for their continuing existence. Feedback through the evaluation indicates the need for organisations to decide what their overall policy towards making resources available will be, based on individual circumstances, including the extent to which they are reliant on the income generated from books and journals for their continuing existence.
  • Overall, the projects have increased the awareness and understanding of OER across a range of disciplines. In many cases this has led – or will in time lead – to the systematic collation of good quality resources in new repositories that will be of enormous benefit to a range of audiences. In other projects gaps have been identified where new OER are required and, encouragingly, there seems to be a real appetite for rising to this challenge. In some instances funding has already been secured to develop new material.
  • In the meantime, I’d like to remind you that all our resources are openly available and we are keen to assist you with any enquiries. One person to contact in the first instance is Professor Stephen Gomez, our Academic Lead for Online Learning. He will be able to inform you about the numerous other initiatives in the e-learning arena that I haven’t had time to discuss here.
  • OCWC Global Conference 2013: Expanding the reach of OERs through Professional, Statutory and Regulatory Bodies (PSRBs)

    1. 1. Expanding the reach of OERs throughProfessional, Statutory and RegulatoryBodies (PSRBs)Professor Stephen Gomez, Alex Fenlon & Dr Rebekah Southern@profgomez OCWC13
    2. 2. Barriers to uptake of OERs Freely available Unregulated Can be produced by anyone Can be altered by anyone ‘Pedigree’ is not recorded All these points  Negative perceptions of quality Barrier to use & production2A question of quality
    3. 3. 3Higher Education Academy(HEA)http://www.heacademy.ac.uk/
    4. 4. 3 years of HEFCE funding~£13million(182,000,000,000 rupiah)3 phases, multiple calls perphase; 115+ projects.66 different institutions(HEI’s, FEC’s, andprofessional bodies).4UK Open Educational ResourcesProgramme- HEA & JISCRussell GroupPost 9294 GroupFECUniversityAllianceUKADIAMillion +ProfessionalBodyUnaffiliated
    5. 5. Phase 1 2009 – 2010 £5.7milDevelopment of resources for teachers, practitioners andstudents, and the exploration of effective use, reuse andadaptation of resources.Phase 2 2010 – 2011 £5milBuilt on phase 1, using partnership models to cascadeinformation; issues around reuse and tracing releasedresources, reward and recognition for staff...Phase 3 2011 – 2012 £2.8milInstitutional policy and change; student voice in OER, significantthematic development, initial and CPD for staff, work withprofessional and learned societies, and support for seniormanagers. 5UK Open Educational ResourcesProgramme- JISC & HEA
    6. 6. UKOER3 JISC Academy ukoer 3 themes and focus areas —Lou McGillhttp://www.wordle.net/show/wrdl/4776236/ukoer3
    7. 7. One theme - Professional, Statutory and RegulatoryBodies (PSRBs) Aims Promote OP with PSRBs & Subject Associations; Facilitate a sustainable change in policy to embedOP at a discipline level; Use existing discipline-specific UK OERs as tosupport education & professional development; Identify suitable resources and for promotion toexisting members & networks.7UKOER programme
    8. 8.  Association for the Study of Medical Education (ASME)- Promoting open approaches in medicine. Royal Society of Chemistry - Higher Education LearnChemistry project Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons Charitable Trust -Aiding the Transition from Veterinary School to Practice Royal Geographical Society (with IB) - OER: Facilitatingand catalysing uptake in Geography Society of Biology - Promoting OER in bioscience HigherEducation.8Participating organisations
    9. 9.  Increased an understanding of OP in medicine; Created a portfolio of scenarios where OP has beenadopted; Highlighted current best practice with support from theexternal copyright consultant; Increased the authority with which organisations leaddiscussions on the adoption of OP; Enabled greater participation in national debate and policydevelopment.9ASME results
    10. 10.  Need to develop more effective policies &procedures, especially around copyright & licencing; Organisations have limited knowledge about CreativeCommons; Difficult to identify authors of open materials; Difficult to identify authors of materials that could be madeinto open materials; Difficult to decide what to make open & what to have‘closed’; Taking part in the project raised awareness of openpractice & likely to lead to a culture change in theorganisation. 10Lessons learned
    11. 11.  Projects increased awareness & understanding of OERacross a range of disciplines.  to the systematic collation of good quality resources innew repositories of enormous benefit to a range ofaudiences.  gaps identified where new OER are required & fundingsecured to develop new material.11Conclusion
    12. 12.  What are your experiences around perception of qualityassurance of open materials? What is your view of using professional bodies to assurethe quality of open materials? What other ways could quality be assured?12Questions
    13. 13. Professor Stephen GomezHEA Academic Lead - Online LearningStephen.Gomez@heacademy.ac.uk@profgomez13Further information

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