Bruce Crocco CBBD 2013

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Bruce Crocco presentation at CBBD 2013 in Florianópolis-Brazil

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  • This is my daughter Liz a at HS graduation in 2006 Reunion this year - YouTube, Twitter, Facebook to chronicle the event Real time.. Interesting 7 years ago YouTube had just launched), Twitter didn’t exist and Facebook was something that only college students were using. As Ingrid said last night the environments our libraries work in are very different than they were 7 years ago, the technology and economic environments are very differentand the users are empowered in very new ways because of the way the web works today. Today I will .
  • Traditionally, libraries aggregated materials in one physical space, and this attracted users to the library. Nothing could be simpler: people go to where the information they need is more easily acceptable, and the library was, in many cases, not just the best, but the only choice.
  • This is the information environment libraries and users live in today. The library is using multiple systems to try and manage their collections and make them accessible to their user. In the meantime as research as shown repeatedly, users are looking for their information first out on the Web, not in the library.
  • For our web sites we have spent budget and our staff time building a similar experience in our web sites requiring users to come to our site to access the resources you manage for them
  • One of the areas I run is our Market Research department. We have done a large number of reports for the library community. One recent one is the Perceptions of Libraries. Not surprising the study revealed users start research with search engines a large majority of the timeOther resources like Wikipedia are becoming starting places as well. Library websites are decreasing as a starting place
  • The study also showed that when comparing libraries to search engines, overwhelmingly, college students consider search engines to be more convenient, faster, more reliable and easier-to-use. Users consider libraries to be more trustworthy and more accurate.
  • In her paper Visitors and Residents, OCLC research scientist Lynn Connaway found an overarching driver for today’s information seeker – CONVENIENCE. Initial results highlight the importance of convenience as a crucial factor in information-seeking behavior
  • If users are seeking information in a variety of sources, and are using many new tools to do research, enjoy media and share their own content… What this means is that there are many organizations, many different types of businesses, each of whom have different resources and needs.Libraries must manage our collections to work for this user environment. CLICK
  • We have to bridge the systems we have built with the way users research, interact and live today.This is the information environment libraries and users work in today. The library is using multiple systems to try and manage their collections and make them accessible to their user. In the meantime as research as shown repeatedly, users are looking for their information first out on the Web, not in the library.
  • We move from personal relationships to Cooperation that creates efficiencies in managing our ability to reach users more easilyIn today’s web of data environment we have the ability to have 10s of thousands of libraries share with millions of users in an interactive way
  • Today I will share a few ways OCLC has looked at the challenges of libraries face in these environments1 ) Describe/Register: Finally, we must change the way we describe and link our data to extract what is most interesting to consumers.2) Aggregate: Gather library collections together at the network level so the grouping becomes more attractive to the web.3) Syndicate: Make that data available to the web in multiple areas to reach users in their favorite web locations
  • Knowledge Cards are literally popping up more on more on the landscape, due in part to the emergence of linked data initiatives. The observation here is that discovery is getting more sophisticated and so too are end user expectations. Knowledge cards point to how end users are becoming more accustomed to finding informationAnd we want libraries to be there also.
  • Today we have managed our catalogs, Local, Regional, Global as separate activities through copying and sharing. In a linked data world we describe (or catalog) and then link to entities such as title, subject, name, placeThis allows the data to be used to create new web objects like Knowledge Cards from multiple resources Including library information is crucial to our future.
  • The key is building and using open linked data in our library collections . This is a area that OCLC has been working on for the last few years
  • Linked data is about identifying and linking together things in a standard way that can be reused globally.
  • We use URIs or Uniform Resource Identifier that points to a web resource about a spacecraftThis picture has an identifier as part of a web location to find it on the web
  • The spacecraft also has other descriptive information that are managed as entities as well
  • Shown graphically
  • The Resource Description Framework (RDF) is a general-purpose language for representing information in the Web. And
  • One of the best examples of using Linked Data is the BBC web site. Their Nature theme show linked data in use
  • Habitats
  • Other animals that live in the habitatsAmazon Manatee
  • Behaviors
  • Social Animal
  • Brings us back to the Malard Duck
  • Behind it all is Linked Data that can be used by any library, organization or person to enhance their work and web experience.
  • The traditional approach to managing our data focuses on the whole record—flat and doesn’t fit in with how the web works.We believe we need to use linked data to strengthen to global use of our collections to help our local users but represent our collections globally
  • WorldCat is a our database of Over 302M member library contributed recordsOver 2B library holdingsAlmost 1B article recordWe have release 250 M records as ODC-BY open linked data trafficWe have a public site worldcat.org for anyone in the world can search the database This is an example search
  • What we have done is added a linked data section which shows are entity definitions and
  • We have worked Schema.org from the beginning and use their definitions.There are other linked data standards for library materials which we are involved with but we used Schema.org to help make the data available in non-library related sites.
  • OCLC has released for experimental purposes portions of Dewey Decimal Classification System.
  • VIAF Represents 20 agencies in 16 countries
  • Aggregation of data provides leverage for organizations to negotiate
  • Partnerships improve access to library collections via WorldCat.org This slide shows how much traffic comes to WC.org from signed partners Google Books is our largest signed partner, with over 12 million referrals last year Google itself – 50 million – started as a signed partnershipRest of the signed partners  9.6 million referrals. 30 such partners, including: EasyBib, GoodReads, BibMe, Lexile, Citavi and others.
  • We discussed knowledge cards beforeCLICK
  • By libraries Describing their collections with linked dataAggregating the data into one or a just a few hubsAnd working together to use the power of the aggregation to enable collections to be syndicated to where our users areCLICKWe can achieve our goal of having the library collections show up as a knowledge card.
  • Obrigado /Thank you
  • Bruce Crocco CBBD 2013

    1. 1. The world’s libraries. Connected. Managing Integration of Library Collections with Today’s Web XXV CBBD Conference July 8, 2013 Bruce Crocco Vice President, Library Services for the Americas OCLC
    2. 2. The world’s libraries. Connected. Library patrons
    3. 3. The world’s libraries. Connected. National/ Global System Electronic Vendor A complex environment Print Vendors Library ILS Circulation Cataloging Self- Service Acquisitions Consortial SystemResolver ERM Meta- search A to Z List Users OPAC
    4. 4. The world’s libraries. Connected. Exemplum College Library Vision Goals Strategies
    5. 5. The world’s libraries. Connected. How college students use information sources Perceptions 2010, p 54 Search engine 2005: 92% 2010: 83% Wikipedia 2005: NA 2010: 7% Library Web site 2005: less than 1% 2010: 0% Library Web site use 2010: 57% 2005: 61% Perceptions of Libraries, 2010 Context and Community
    6. 6. The world’s libraries. Connected. Libraries vs. search engines Perceptions 2010, p 55 Perceptions of Libraries, 2010 Context and Community More trustworthy 76% 24% More accurate 69% 31% Faster 8% 92% More convenient 13% 87% Easier-to-use 16% 84% More reliable 36% 64% Libraries: more trustworthy Search engines: faster
    7. 7. The world’s libraries. Connected. http://oc.lc/Convenience
    8. 8. The world’s libraries. Connected. The User Has Many Choices
    9. 9. The world’s libraries. Connected. National/ Global System Electronic Vendor Bringing the User and Library Environments Together Print Vendors Library ILS Circulation Cataloging Self- Service Acquisitions Consortial SystemResolver ERM Meta- search A to Z List YouTube Good Reads Users Facebook Wikipedia Amazon WebMD BBC News HathiTrust iTunes Scholar portals EasyBib Google Scholar ESPN OPAC JSTOR university.edu Google
    10. 10. The world’s libraries. Connected. The ―problem‖ with access to library collections isn’t that the user isn’t using the library catalog. The problem is that access to library collections is imperfect because we are not exposing our collections to today’s web as well as we should.
    11. 11. The world’s libraries. Connected. DataCuratorToolAudience Time Era Scribe Card OPAC Web Web of Data
    12. 12. The world’s libraries. Connected. Scribe Card Catalog OPAC Web Web of Data Impact ratio of data curators to audience 1 to several several to hundreds dozens to thousands hundreds to tens-of thousands tens-of thousands to millions
    13. 13. The world’s libraries. Connected. Scribe Card Catalog OPAC Web Web of Data Impact ratio of data curators to audience benefits personal literacy societal education community access efficiency cooperation economy ubiquity creativity social discovery research relationship serendipity
    14. 14. The world’s libraries. Connected. Describe/Register Aggregate Syndicate
    15. 15. The world’s libraries. Connected. Knowledge Cards
    16. 16. The world’s libraries. Connected. Managing Entities Local Catalogs Regional Global
    17. 17. The world’s libraries. Connected. Managing Entities Cataloging in a linked environment: Locating the resource within a network of useful links.
    18. 18. The world’s libraries. Connected. Linked Data
    19. 19. The world’s libraries. Connected. Linked Data
    20. 20. The world’s libraries. Connected. Linked Data
    21. 21. The world’s libraries. Connected. Linked Data
    22. 22. The world’s libraries. Connected. Linked Data
    23. 23. The world’s libraries. Connected. Linked Data
    24. 24. The world’s libraries. Connected.
    25. 25. The world’s libraries. Connected.
    26. 26. The world’s libraries. Connected.
    27. 27. The world’s libraries. Connected.
    28. 28. The world’s libraries. Connected.
    29. 29. The world’s libraries. Connected.
    30. 30. The world’s libraries. Connected.
    31. 31. The world’s libraries. Connected.
    32. 32. The world’s libraries. Connected.
    33. 33. The world’s libraries. Connected.
    34. 34. The world’s libraries. Connected. Metadata Management in the Future Algorithmic Data Loading & Mining Cataloging Title: Subject:
    35. 35. The world’s libraries. Connected. Managing Entities for Linked Data • Manage all of the data—not just books and journals • Today focus on books and journals • Users care about parts of books, articles, collections • Change cataloging to manage entities: • Works • Persons (via authority files) • Manifestations • Concepts • Places
    36. 36. The world’s libraries. Connected. OCLC Experience with Linked Data
    37. 37. The world’s libraries. Connected.
    38. 38. The world’s libraries. Connected.
    39. 39. The world’s libraries. Connected.
    40. 40. The world’s libraries. Connected. OCLC Open Linked Data – FAST Subject Headings
    41. 41. The world’s libraries. Connected. OCLC Open Linked Data – Dewey Decimal Classification
    42. 42. The world’s libraries. Connected. OCLC Open Linked Data – VIAF International Authority File
    43. 43. The world’s libraries. Connected. Aggregation Institution Location Hours Collections Print Electronic/Licensed Digital Services OPAC Resource sharing Remote access Concepts Dewey FAST Events CBBD People WorldCat Identities Wikipedia Central Data Hub
    44. 44. The world’s libraries. Connected. Data Hubs
    45. 45. The world’s libraries. Connected. Central Data Hub Syndication
    46. 46. The world’s libraries. Connected. 0 20,000,000 40,000,000 60,000,000 80,000,000 100,000,000 120,000,000 FY10 FY11 FY12 FY13 (est) Users Find Library Content WorldCat Syndication Library Content Views
    47. 47. The world’s libraries. Connected. Libraries create value on the web with authorities
    48. 48. The world’s libraries. Connected. Knowledge Cards
    49. 49. The world’s libraries. Connected. Library Collections in Today’s Web Universidade Federal de Santa Catarina Biblioteca The Goal
    50. 50. The world’s libraries. Connected. Obrigado

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