Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)<br />Education at a Glance 2010Key results<br />7September 2...
Education in times of economic uncertainty<br />In the current economic environment…<br />…	Continued strong demand for ed...
Unabated educational expansion<br />
Growth in baseline qualifications (2008)Approximated by percentage of persons with upper secondary or equivalent qualifica...
Growth in university-level qualificationsApproximated by the percentage of the population that has attained tertiary-type ...
Current and future stock of high qualification (2008)<br />25<br />OECD average<br />High attainment; <br />Lower attainme...
The increase in the number of number knowledge workers has not led to a decrease in their pay<br />…which is what happened...
Positive relation between education and employment Percentage of 25-64 year-olds in employment (2008)<br /> Chart A6.1<br />
Relative earnings from employment for males By level of educational attainment and gender for 25-to-64-year-olds (upper se...
Relative earnings from employment for femalesBy level of educational attainment and gender for 25-to-64-year-olds (upper s...
Components of the private net present value for a male with higher education<br />Net present value in USD equ.<br />
Components of the private net present value for a female with higher education<br />Net present value in USD equivalent<br />
Public and private investment for a male obtaining higher education<br />Public costs<br />Privatecosts<br />Total investm...
Public and private investment for a female obtaining higher education<br />Public costs<br />Privatecosts<br />Total inves...
Percentage point change of relative earnings; 25-64 year-olds (1998 -2008 or latest available years)<br />TA7.2a<br />* Li...
Taxpayers are getting a good return too<br />
Thousands USD<br />625 559<br />500<br />Private<br />Private<br />Tertiary education<br />Upper secondary education<br />...
Public cost and benefits for a male obtaining tertiary education<br />Public costs<br />Net present value, USD equivalent<...
Public cost and benefits for a male obtaining upper secondary or post-secondary non-tertiary education<br />Net present va...
Incrementaldifferences in self-reported good health and political interest associated with an increase in the level of edu...
Proportion of adults reporting good health,by level of educational attainment (2008)<br />%<br />Chart A9.1<br />
Women still earn less<br />but the gap is smaller for better-educated women<br />
Differences in full-time, full-year earnings between females and males (2008)by level of educational attainment<br />Chart...
Education and competitiveness<br />Using the skill potential<br />
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Panorama de la Educación 2010

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Presentación del Panorama de la Educación 2010 (Mexico, 07 septiembre 2010)

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  • Net entry rate and expenditure per student (in USD) in tertiary-type A programmes are added next to country names.
  • Panorama de la Educación 2010

    1. 1. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD)<br />Education at a Glance 2010Key results<br />7September 2010<br />
    2. 2. Education in times of economic uncertainty<br />In the current economic environment…<br />… Continued strong demand for education <br />Poor labour markets and low opportunity costs for education<br />… Substantial public and private gains from education<br />Earnings premium for tertiary education remains large<br />- Public long-term gains from higher education are almost three times the size of the investments<br />… High-level skills key to competitiveness<br />… Comparative cost advantage across OECD countries varies with educational levels<br />… Labour-market entry becomes more difficult<br />Particularly for young lower educated individuals <br />… Education a good insurance against unemployment and to stay employed especially in weak labour markets<br />Educational attainment likely to rise further<br />Continuing education increasingly important .<br />
    3. 3. Unabated educational expansion<br />
    4. 4. Growth in baseline qualifications (2008)Approximated by percentage of persons with upper secondary or equivalent qualifications in the age groups 55-64, 45-55, 45-44 and 25-34 years<br />%<br />TA1.2a<br />
    5. 5. Growth in university-level qualificationsApproximated by the percentage of the population that has attained tertiary-type A education in the age groups 25-34 years, 35-44 years, 45-54 years and 55-64 years (2008)<br />%<br />T A1.3a<br />
    6. 6. Current and future stock of high qualification (2008)<br />25<br />OECD average<br />High attainment; <br />Lower attainment; <br />Catching up<br />Increasing advantage<br />Korea<br />20<br />15<br />France<br />Poland<br />Japan<br />Ireland<br />Luxembourg<br />OECD average<br />Higher attainment<br />Belgium<br />10<br />Norway<br />Chile<br />Spain<br />Portugal<br />Increasing advantage<br />Denmark<br />Sweden<br />Slovenia<br />New Zealand<br />Canada<br />Netherlands<br />Australia<br />Hungary<br />Italy<br />United Kingdom<br />5<br />Greece<br />Switzerland<br />Mexico<br />Turkey<br />Slovak Republic<br />Iceland<br />Russian Federation<br />Czech Republic<br />Finland<br />Austria<br />Estonia<br />Brazil<br />United States<br />0<br />Germany<br />Israel<br />Lower attainment; <br />High attainment; <br />Getting behind further<br />Decreasing advantage<br />-<br />5<br />0<br />10<br />20<br />30<br />40<br />50<br />60<br />Proportion of the 25<br />-<br />64 year<br />-<br />old population with tertiary <br />education<br />
    7. 7. The increase in the number of number knowledge workers has not led to a decrease in their pay<br />…which is what happened for low-skilled workers <br />
    8. 8. Positive relation between education and employment Percentage of 25-64 year-olds in employment (2008)<br /> Chart A6.1<br />
    9. 9. Relative earnings from employment for males By level of educational attainment and gender for 25-to-64-year-olds (upper secondary and post-secondary non-tertiary education= 100) (2008 or latest available year)<br />% of index<br />TA7.2a<br />
    10. 10. Relative earnings from employment for femalesBy level of educational attainment and gender for 25-to-64-year-olds (upper secondary and post-secondary non-tertiary education=100) (2008 or latest available year)<br />% of index<br />Chart A7.2b<br />
    11. 11. Components of the private net present value for a male with higher education<br />Net present value in USD equ.<br />
    12. 12. Components of the private net present value for a female with higher education<br />Net present value in USD equivalent<br />
    13. 13. Public and private investment for a male obtaining higher education<br />Public costs<br />Privatecosts<br />Total investmentprivate+public in USD equivalent<br />USD equivalent<br />
    14. 14. Public and private investment for a female obtaining higher education<br />Public costs<br />Privatecosts<br />Total investmentprivate+public in USD equivalent<br />USD equivalent<br />
    15. 15. Percentage point change of relative earnings; 25-64 year-olds (1998 -2008 or latest available years)<br />TA7.2a<br />* Limited years; Other notes: Yellow within +/- 3%; Red > -3%; Green > +3%<br />
    16. 16. Taxpayers are getting a good return too<br />
    17. 17. Thousands USD<br />625 559<br />500<br />Private<br />Private<br />Tertiary education<br />Upper secondary education<br />450<br />Public<br />Public<br />Upper secondary education<br />Tertiary education<br />508 776<br />526 118<br />400<br />487 733<br />Total public and private return <br />440 543<br />444 638<br />350<br />300<br />416 776<br />350 172<br />351 693<br />358 627<br />335 525<br />250<br />297 050<br />291 248<br />204 820<br />279 714<br />200<br />215 189<br />262 035<br />217 342<br />181 500<br />150<br />131 993<br />129 809<br />100<br />50<br />0<br />Private and public returns for a male obtaining an upper secondary (ISCED 3/4), and obtaining a tertiary education, (ISCED 5/6); 3% real interest rate<br />Chart A8.1<br />
    18. 18. Public cost and benefits for a male obtaining tertiary education<br />Public costs<br />Net present value, USD equivalent<br />Public benefits<br />Chart A8.5<br />USD<br />
    19. 19. Public cost and benefits for a male obtaining upper secondary or post-secondary non-tertiary education<br />Net present value, USD equivalent<br />Public costs<br />Public benefits<br />Chart A8.5<br />USD<br />
    20. 20. Incrementaldifferences in self-reported good health and political interest associated with an increase in the level of educational attainment<br />Political interest<br />Movingfrombelowuppersecondary to uppersecondary<br />Health <br />Movingfromuppersecondary to tertiary<br />C A9.4 <br />C A9.5<br />
    21. 21. Proportion of adults reporting good health,by level of educational attainment (2008)<br />%<br />Chart A9.1<br />
    22. 22. Women still earn less<br />but the gap is smaller for better-educated women<br />
    23. 23. Differences in full-time, full-year earnings between females and males (2008)by level of educational attainment<br />Chart A7.1<br />
    24. 24. Education and competitiveness<br />Using the skill potential<br />
    25. 25. Most tertiary graduates also work in skilled occupationsProportion of 25-29 year-olds with tertiary degree working in semi-skilled or elementary occupations<br />Chart C3.5<br />
    26. 26. Education and occupational mismatches among 25-29-year-olds (2007) Proportion of 25-29 year-old workers not in education with a tertiary-level degree working in semi-skilled or elementary occupations (ISCO 4-9) to all 25-29 year-old workers not in education with a tertiary degree<br />
    27. 27. Labour costs for different qualificationsDeviation from the OECD mean in annual labour costs<br />In USD for 25-64 year-old population<br />Chart A10.2<br />
    28. 28. Deviation from the OECD mean annual labour costs of tertiary-educated individuals, by age groupsUSD 64 000 for the 25-64 year-old populationand USD 50 000 for the 25-34 year-old population<br />Chart A10.1<br />
    29. 29. Skills supply and skills premium Labour cost ratio of tertiary educated individuals (5/6) to below upper secondary individuals (0/1/2) and attainment levels <br />Chart A10.5<br />
    30. 30. Foreign direct investment and annual labour costs for tertiary educated male 25-64 year-old populationForeign direct investment (FDI) net balance as a percentage of GDP (average 2003-08) and annual labour costs (USD) for tertiary educated male 25-64 year-old population<br />
    31. 31. Education and competitiveness<br />Student mobility<br />
    32. 32. An increasingly mobile student population<br />In 2008, over 3.3 million tertiary students were enrolled outside their country of citizenship<br />New players are emerging in an increasingly competitive market for international education<br />Russia expanded its market share by two percentage points over the past decade and Australia, Korea and New Zealand each by one percentage point <br />Share of the U.S. dropped from 26% to 19%Germany, the U.K. and Belgium also lost ground<br />Largest numbers of international students are from China and India<br />
    33. 33. Student mobility in tertiary education (2008)Percentage of international students in tertiary enrolments<br />Chart C2.1<br />
    34. 34. Distribution of foreign students in tertiary education, by country of destination (2008)Percentage of foreign tertiary students reported to the OECD who are enrolled in each country of destination<br />Chart C2.2<br />
    35. 35. Trends in international education market shares Percentage of all foreign tertiary students enrolled by destination<br />Market share (%)<br />
    36. 36. University-level graduation rate (first degree): Impact of international/foreign students (2008)<br />%<br />
    37. 37. Who pays for what, when and how?<br />
    38. 38. Investment in education<br />OECD countries as a whole spend 6.2% of their GDP on education<br />Expenditure per school student increased on average by 43% between 1995 and 2007 <br />Mixed pattern in tertiary education<br />Countries vary significantly in how they spend their money, different priorities on…<br />… Salaries, learning time, teaching time, class size<br />Room for more effective cost-sharing between government and households <br />Even if household expenditure rose much faster than public spending in tertiary education .<br />
    39. 39. Total public expenditure on education,as a percentage of total public expenditure (2000, 2007)<br />Chart B4.1<br />
    40. 40. Expenditure on educational institutions as a percentage of GDP, for all levels of education (1995, 2000, 2007)<br />
    41. 41. Changes in student numbers and expenditure for tertiary education<br />Index of change between 2000 and 2007 (2000=100, 2007 constant prices)<br />Chart B1.7<br />
    42. 42. Share of private expenditure on educational institutions (2007)percentage, by level of education<br />Chart B3.1<br />
    43. 43. USD<br />5000<br />4000<br />3000<br />2000<br />1000<br />500<br />0<br />Average annual tuition fees charged by tertiary-type A public institutions for full-time national students (academic year 2006-07)<br />United States (65%, 27 010)<br />Korea (61%, 10 115), United Kingdom1(55%, 15 463)<br />Japan (46%, 15 822), <br />Australia (86%, 15 944), <br />Canada (m, 24 424) <br />This chartdoes not takeintoaccountgrants, subsidies or loansthatpartially or fully offset the students’ tuitionfees<br />New Zealand (76%, 10 666)<br />Netherlands (60%, 15 969)<br />Portugal (64%, m), Italy (53%, 8 678)<br />Austria (42%, 15 174), Spain (41%, 12 940), <br />Belgium (Fr. and Fl.) (m, m)<br />Chart B5.1<br />France (m, 13 467)<br />Czech Republic (54%, 8 621), Denmark (57%, 16 646), Finland (71%, 13 566), Ireland (44%, 12 631), Iceland (73%, 9 309), Mexico (32%, 6 971), Norway (70%, 17 140), Sweden (73%, 19 013)<br />1. Public institutions do not exist at this level of education and most students are enrolled in government-dependent private institutions.<br />
    44. 44. Public subsidies for education in tertiary education (2007)Public subsidies for education to households and other private entities as a percentage of total public expenditure on education, by type of subsidy<br />Chart B5.2<br />
    45. 45. Average tuition fees and proportion of students who benefit from public loans and/or scholarships/grants Tertiary-type A, public institutions, academic year 2006/07, national full-time students<br />Bubble size shows graduation rates<br />Averagetuitionfeescharged by public institutions in USD<br />Group 2:Potentially high financial barriers for entry to tertiary-type A education, but also large public subsidies to students.<br />Group 3:Extensive and broadly uniform cost sharing across students, student support systems somewhat less developed. <br />Group 4:Relatively low financial barriers to entry to tertiary education and relatively low subsidies<br />Group 1:No (or low) financial barriers for tertiary studies due to tuition fees and still a high level of student aid. <br />Chart B5.3<br />% of students who benefit from public loans AND/OR sholarships/grants<br />
    46. 46. Changes in student numbers and expenditurePrimary, secondary and post-secondary non-tertiary education<br />Index of change between 2000 and 2007 (2000=100, 2007 constant prices)<br />Index of change (2000=100)<br />Chart B1.7<br />
    47. 47. Cumulative expenditure on educational institutions per student over primary and secondary studies (2007) Annual expenditure on educational institutions per student multiplied by the theoretical duration of studies, in equivalent USD converted using PPPs<br />OECD average (primary and secondary)<br />Chart B1.4<br />
    48. 48. Contribution of various factors to salary cost per primary student (US$) <br />TB7.1<br />
    49. 49. Distribution of current expenditure by educational institutionsfor primary, secondary and post-secondary non-tertiary education (2007)<br />Chart B6.1<br />
    50. 50. Total number of intended instruction hours in public institutions between the ages of 7 and 14 (2008) <br />Students in OECD countries are expected to receive, on average, 6 777 hours of instruction between the ages of 7 and 14, of which 1 554 between ages 7 and 8, <br />2 467 between ages 9 and 11, and 2 755 between ages 12 and 14. The large majority of intended hours of instruction is compulsory.<br />Chart D1.1<br />Total number of intended instruction time in hours<br />
    51. 51. Average class size in primary education (2000, 2008)<br />Chart D2.1<br />
    52. 52. Average class size<br />Number of students per classroom<br />Chart D2.2<br />
    53. 53. Teachers’ salaries (minimum, after 15 years experience, and maximum) in lower secondary education (2008)Annual statutory teachers’ salaries in public institutions in lower secondary education, in equivalent USD converted using PPPs<br />Equivalent USD converted using PPPs<br />The annual statutory salaries of lower secondary teachers with 15 years of experience range from less than USD 16 000 in Hungary and in the partner country Estonia to over USD 54 000 or more in Germany, Ireland, Korea and Switzerland and more than USD 98 000 in Luxembourg.<br />Chart D3.2<br />
    54. 54. Changes in teachers’ salaries in lower secondary education, by point in the salary scale (1996, 2008)Index of change between 1996 and 2008 (1996=100, 2008 price levels using GDP deflators)<br />Indexof change<br />Chart D3.3<br />
    55. 55. Number of teaching hours per year, by level of education (2008) Net contact time in hours per year in public institutions<br />Hours per year<br />Chart D4.2<br />
    56. 56. Number of teaching hours per year in lower secondary education (2008)<br />Chart D4.1<br />
    57. 57. Opportunities for parents to exercise voice at the school level within the public school sector<br />D6<br />Green: Yes Yellow: No, although they might exist Red: No<br />
    58. 58. Public & private schools’ role in providing compulsory educationLegally permitted to operate and provide compulsory education<br />Yes<br />No<br />No for primary<br />Yes for lower secondary <br />Yes for primary No for lower secondary <br />D5.2<br />
    59. 59. Freedom for parents to choose a public lower secondary school<br />Yes<br />No<br />TD5.1<br />
    60. 60. Lifelong learning is becoming a reality……but not for all<br />Those who need it most get the least of it<br />
    61. 61. Participation of 25-64-year-olds in formal and/or non-formal education (2007)<br />%<br />ChartA5.1<br />
    62. 62. Participation of 25-64-year-olds in formal and/or non-formal education (2007) <br />
    63. 63. Mean hours per participant and participation in non-formal education, adult population (2007)<br />Chart A5.5<br />
    64. 64. Participation in formal and/or non-formal education by occupations (2007)<br />T A5.4a<br />
    65. 65. Participation rates in formal and/or non-formal education grouped by information seeking aspects (2007)<br />TA5.4a<br />
    66. 66. www.oecd.org<br />All national and international publications<br />The complete micro-level database<br />Email: Andreas.Schleicher@OECD.org<br />… and remember:<br /> Without data, you are just another person with an opinion<br />Thank you !<br />
    67. 67. Upper secondary graduation rates (1995, 2008)Percentage of graduates to the population at the typical age of graduation (unduplicated count)<br />%<br />Chart A2.2<br />
    68. 68. Upper secondary graduation rate (2008) Percentage, by age group<br />Chart A2.1<br />
    69. 69. Access to tertiary-type A education for upper secondary graduates (2008)<br />%<br />Chart A2.2<br />
    70. 70. Entry rates into tertiary-type A education<br />Chart A2.3<br />
    71. 71. Entry rate into tertiary type A: Impact of international students (2008)<br />%<br />Chart A2.5<br />
    72. 72. Tertiary-type A graduation rates in 2008 (first-time graduation) Percentage, by age group<br />Chart A3.1<br />
    73. 73. Enrolment rates of 20-29 year-olds (1995, 2000 and 2008)Full-time and part-time students in public and private institutions<br />OECD average for countries with 1995, 2000 and 2008 data<br />Chart C1.1<br />
    74. 74. Proportion of students who enter tertiary education without graduating from at least a first degree at this level (2008) <br />Chart A4.1<br />

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