OECD, Toby Green

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  • Clay Shirky, noted US writer about all things online and digital, is, of course, a best-selling author. I bet his publisher doesn’t just push a button . . .
  • To remind audience that the mandate is Part I statistical data only.No mandate or commitment on publicationsWe will continue to sell, including statistical data servicesPublishing Policy is unchanged save for the commitment that 100% of Part I data be freely available in basic form
  • Key message: Delta continues the existing practice of stepping up the value chain to find revenues and using these revenues to build improved free services to non-subscribers.This is why Freemium model can work: As new needs emerge, new, innovative, premium services are provided generating the revenues to enable mature services to become free.
  • Key message: Delta continues the existing practice of stepping up the value chain to find revenues and using these revenues to build improved free services to non-subscribers.
  • Analytical content: 100% freeFull ‘Read’ service on iLibrary and oecd.org (now available on mobile devices)Full ‘Read’ service on Google BooksAll declassified documents free on oecd.orgData: 70% free, includingAll core indicators and data: Factbook, At a Glance, Key TablesThe most popular data from all OECD databasesNB The remaining 30% data is highly specialized. The consultant’s report concluded that making it free would represent only a marginal increase in use and impact (less than 1% of today’s free data)Dissemination figures2.4 million1.6 new revenue800k efficiencies
  • OECD, Toby Green

    1. 1. Freemium Access A Case Study in Sustainable Publishing: OECD Toby Green Head of Publishing toby.green@oecd.org Open Access Monographs in the Humanities and Social Sciences Conference. July 1-2, 2013
    2. 2. “The audience which finds your content interesting and useful is always larger than you think.” AuthorsResearchersStudentsPractitioners, unaffiliated researchers, educated layman . . . . Do we know our audience . . .?
    3. 3. Demand for scholarly works: More students = more readers in the future 50% going to university c.14 countries in 2000 25 countries in 2010 But they won’t all go into research or work in subscribing institutions
    4. 4. . . . and all these graduates are growing up in a knowledge economy . . . No! You have to subscribe to knowledge!
    5. 5. . . . and the policymakers and funders are listening . . . and acting . . . What do you mean, these reports cost money? We paid for the @*^%$ research!
    6. 6. . . . so publishers are reacting . . . Don’t worry, Dad, I’m going to turn this company around 360 degrees!
    7. 7. AuthorsResearchersStudentsPractitioners, unaffiliated researchers, educated layman . . . . . . . by turning their attention to authors (and their funders) . . .at the risk of ignoring the needs of . . . READERS(and their institutions)
    8. 8. We need a little balance (and calm) For the benefit of all stakeholders in the knowledge economy: • Authors • Funders • Taxpayers • Readers • Publishers • Policymakers • Librarians . . . FREEMIUM And we think may be the new publishing paradigm
    9. 9. OECD‟s publishing policy MAXIMISE DISSEMINATION (everything has to be free) FULL COST RECOVERY (everything needs to be priced) $16.5M
    10. 10. Readers have different contexts • Home or SME or mobile • Occasional, low intensity • No or low desire for added- value services • Institution, desk-bound • High intensity, re-use • Opportunity for value-added support and services
    11. 11. Readers‟ and institutional needs are multi-faceted and evolving Needs Time PREMIUM Read on PC Save offline, copy-paste Enhanced discovery Download associated data (StatLinks) Citation tools, Text mining Basic discovery Read on tablets Save in information management systems (e.g. Mendeley) Share, Embed ValueSupport for libraries FREE Simple Complex FREEMIUM
    12. 12. OECD‟s Freemium boundary evolves All content free to read online Basic downloadable edition 1999 2004 2005-2010 Enhanced downloadable edition 20% of pages free to read 100% of pages free to read 20-30% of books free to downloadNon-customers (free access) Customers (Cost recovery) Download by chapter 2012 Read by chapter Today Services
    13. 13. Our offers OECD iLibrary SERVICES Delivery and support: • OECD Offices • Partners, Agents MOBILE Books Periodicals PRODUCTS Distribution channels: • OECD Online Bookshop • Tradtional Booktrade • E-Bookshops • Subscription agents • Resellers
    14. 14. FREEMIUM means we can maximise dissemination (more people read our stuff!) 14 - 2,000 4,000 6,000 8,000 10,000 12,000 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Sold Free In 2012, 10 out of 12 readings were free of charge Downloads(„000s) MAXIMISE DISSEMINATION
    15. 15. Freemium means cost recovery Income(millionseuros) 0 2 4 6 8 10 12 14 2000 2001 2002 2003 2004 2005 2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011 2012 Books Periodicals PRODUCTS OECD iLibrary SERVICES FULL COST RECOVERY c. 300 institutions with premium services to all titles c. 1200 institutions with premium services to all titles
    16. 16. Freemium in action www.oecd-ilibrary.org
    17. 17. Thank you Toby Green Head of Publishing, OECD toby.green@oecd.org www.oecd-ilibrary.org @TobyABGreen

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