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OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University
OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University
OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University
OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University
OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University
OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University
OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University
OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University
OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University
OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University
OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University
OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University
OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University
OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University
OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University
OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University
OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University
OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University
OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University
OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University
OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University
OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University
OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University
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OAPEN-UK at Open Access Week 2013 - Dundee University

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Presentation on open access monographs and the oapen-uk project given at Dundee University during Open Access 2013

Presentation on open access monographs and the oapen-uk project given at Dundee University during Open Access 2013

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  • First of all thank you for inviting me up to talk about open access monographs and the OAPEN UK project. I thought that I would first talk a little about the role the monograph plays in humanities and social science research and then move onto why we are exploring a transition from traditional publishing to open access. I will then go on to talk about the OAPEN-UK project, which is my research project and what might happen next in this area.Please feel free to ask questions as we go.
  • Ok so lets start with why monographs? As I am sure you are aware, the monograph is the standard against which performance and standing of the researcher is judged. A major output of the AHSS accounting for 2/3rds of the AHRC funded research, the monograph is the primary method by which researchers communicate and disseminate their research.Yet over the last three decades, sales of monographs have fallen from an average of 2000 to just 200. In addtion, unit prices have increased to highs of £160 in some cases and as a consequence of library budgets being squeezed to support the journals, libraries have reduced the number they purchase. The result of this is less books in circulation and available for reading.What does this mean for scholarship? In an area which has discourse at its heart, the restrictions and limitation, can mean that conversations needed to progress research may not be happening. And whilst this may not seem like a big issue for researchers in the developed world, researchers in the developing world, who have little access to these monographs, are left in the bleachers.In addition, as the AHSS fights for funding, there is a real need for researchers to be able to demonstrate the reach and impact of the work they have done.Digital has helped somewhat with this, but it is still restricted to those who can pay. Could moving to an open access model provide some solutions?At the recent OA monographs conference, Jean Claude Geydon, an academic from Montreal spoke about how books are no longer a solitary activity, that it is the conversations, the collaborations and the discussion of ideas in coffee shops and online, the post publication commenting, corrections and further development of ideas – that make a book today. He believes that the idea of authorship belongs specifically to the world of traditionally printed books, and that - in a digital world - it can be done away with, as richer collaborations produce more original ideas and better work. It is this idea that opening up and sharing knowledge can make scholarship better - and it is open access that can support this. In addition, it is possible that an open model can increase reach, readership and impact.
  • The potential for open access to support researchers and to enhance scholarship through greater discourse and collaboration has taken hold here in the UK and in countries across the world. Yet we are still at the early stages of experimentation. I’ve just put up some dates so that you can see the progression from some of the main projects in the area. A major catalyst was the EU funded Open Access Publishing in European Networks (OAPEN) project that undertook significant research into business models, user needs and best practice. This stimulated the OAPEN-UK project which I manage and which I will be talking about later. Then there was the finch report which acknowledges OAPEN and OAPEN-UK but excluded monographs. In May 2013, the Wellcome Trust was the first funder to mandate OA monographs and book chapters to align with its other OA policies. Mainly in the area of medical humanities. We then had the HEFCE REF consultation which again acknowledged OAPEN-UK and the need for further experimentation and therefore excluded monographs from this consultation. In september this year, the Jisc set up its national monograph strategy group, a co-design project with SCONUL and RLUK to explore the potential for a national approach to collection, supply, preservation and digitisation of monographs. And last but not least, following the HEFCE REF consultation HEFCE has established the OA monographs reference group which has its first meeting in November this year.So as you can see, initially, back in 2008 and 2010 when we started OAPEN-UK there was very little interest or awareness of OA monographs – so much so that it was hard work getting publishers to engage with these indiatives at all. Now, post finch, there is much more recognition that OA could support a vibrant monographs market and that collaboration and experiementation is needed – and publishers have also wakened up – now they are approaching me asking to be involved and we have just added OUP to our project.Across the world there is a also lot of activity happening in the area. Australia has been particularly active as has America, Austria and Germany.
  • So why is it that we need all this experimentation? What is it that is stopping us from moving over to an open access model right now?Well first the monograph market exists in a delicate balance – publishers often use revenue from other parts of the company to support the monograph and secondly, we need to be careful how the market is disrupted to ensure that whilst the monograph remains a key standard in career evaluation panels etc, that we do not bring down or harm HSS research in any way.This means a slow transition with lots and lots of consultation and testing is needed to help address some of the main issues that are arising from research in the area:Academic reaction – perception and attitudes – acceptance of change, how does it impact on my work flows, why is this being done to me?Quality of content and processes (peer review) – quality is a central component that must not be compromised, we need to avoid situations such as the recent journal scam happening. Assessment and career progression – what impact might OA monos have? Would an OA be seen on equal footing to a printed one by career panels? Will it be accepted by REF, will something I do not impact on my REF submissions later?Fears over Creative Commons – there are a lot of worries about CC licensing….Business models and funding – we need to find viable business models which is particularly hard in this market. How the OA monos will be funded is a particular issue, especially for early career researchers who may not have the same access to funding as more established academicsStandards adoption – how do you as a researcher verify the publisher? DOAB, access, discoverability, preservationUK v International – need to be considerate that a high proportion of monographs are published by publishers outside the UK, especially in the US. Will the monograph continue to exist? Or will we move towards more journal articles or shot form writing and what about the potential interactivity of the book. Will the author continue to exist?And the thing that can really help with these issues is understanding, evidence, being able to see things from other stakeholders perspectives and this is why we are undertaking OAPEN-UK.
  • OAPEN-UK is a four-year research project that is exploring an OA model for publishing HSS monographs in collaboration with publishers, research funders, learned societies, researchers and institutions. JISC and the AHRC have provided funding for the OAPEN-UK project. The project is exploring open access scholarly monograph publishing in the humanities and social sciences. It is an innovative and highly consultative project – working in an area where little research exists and connecting with all the key stakeholders to identify and discuss concerns, challenges, perceptions and opportunities related to a transition to open access monographs. OAPEN-UK recognises that open access will require changes to current working practice as well as cultural change and that resistance to change is inevitable. By working with each stakeholder and sharing findings between stakeholders, the project promotes understanding and knowledge and enables stakeholders to make informed decisions based on evidence, rather than assumptions.There are two elements to OAPEN, the evidence we are gathering to test a business model and the research programme.OAPEN-UK is a four-year research project that is exploring an OA model for publishing HSS monographs in collaboration with publishers, research funders, learned societies, researchers and institutions. JISC and the AHRC have provided funding for the OAPEN-UK project. The project is exploring open access scholarly monograph publishing in the humanities and social sciences. It is an innovative and highly consultative project – working in an area where little research exists and connecting with all the key stakeholders to identify and discuss concerns, challenges, perceptions and opportunities related to a transition to open access monographs. OAPEN-UK recognises that open access will require changes to current working practice as well as cultural change and that resistance to change is inevitable. By working with each stakeholder and sharing findings between stakeholders, the project promotes understanding and knowledge and enables stakeholders to make informed decisions based on evidence, rather than assumptions.Move onto the OAPEN-UK project and what we are doing in terms of research and experimentationWhat have we found
  • We are piloting the model used by the OAPEN project which was an EU project whereby a grant is paid to the publisher who publish a PDF of the monograph available under a creative commons licence but can also generate revenue through sales of print and ebook device friendly editions such as epub.What we have done though is set up two groups in our pilot – the open access group and the control group. Publishers were invited to submit titles for inclusion in the pilot but they had to submit pairs of titles matched on subject area, publication date, sales etc. The pairs were then selected by the project’s Steering Group and one from each pair randomly selected to go into the experimental group and one into the control group.The titles in the OA pot are made available under a CC licence from the publishers website, the OAPEN Library website and IRs. The control group titles are made available for sale under the publishers normal route such as for sale to libraries as part of packages, via aggregators.All the titles, whether OA or Control are available for purchase in print format and some are also available in epub or specific e-formats such as amz. We have 58 tiles from Palgrave Macmillan, Taylor & Francis, Berg Publishers, Liverpool University Press and University Wales Press and over the next three years we will gather and compare sales and usage data for each group to measure the effects on OA.The pilot is just one part of OAPEN UK, we are also running a large programme of researchExperiment with 29 pairs of titles to track differences in sales and usage between OA and control group titles - identify what happens in a real-world scenario where traditional publishers attempt to incorporate an OA model into their existing workflows- explore the difference between sales and usage of OA and control group books to inform business model development- explore effects on both front- and back-list titles to see whether OA can reinvigorate usage and sales of older books - openly accessible information (which would usually be considered commercially sensitive by publishers) about sales and usage to inform new market entrants including university and researcher presses and consortia as well as traditional publishers who are considering offering an OA model for researchers to use - templates and protocols for data collection established, baseline, 6 month and year 1 data collected- further rounds of data collection and analysis at end of years 2 and 3.
  • - inform development of other work packages- ensure project remains agile within rapidly-changing environment- maintains awareness of wider developments in related areas e.g. electronic publishing, university presses, open access policies- centralised, open resource for anyone interested in open access monographs- supports other projects and experiments in this area e.g. Knowledge Unlatched- first iteration available on project website - all relevant literature plus blogs, tweets, news articles etc tagged in OAPEN UK diigo group (openly-available resource) on regular basis- next iteration of literature review will be made live in June 2013
  • 2: Annual benchmarking survey Annual survey of project participants (authors and steering group) to track attitudinal changescapture perceptions and views of participants as project progresses, particularly in reaction to data collected through other work packagescontinuing evaluation of the project as it progresses, allowing us to make adjustments evaluation of multi-stakeholder approach and identification of different opinions within stakeholder groups shows progress of views by range of stakeholders involved in a collaborative OA monograph project, suggesting key messages for anyone trying to change attitudes or practice around OA monographs First year complete and results on the project website. Second year released in March 2013 following February advisory group meeting.
  • 3: Initial focus groups 6 focus groups with key project stakeholders identified through initial project mapping: researchers, institutions, publishers, aggregators, funders, learned societies identify key issues and challenges of OA monographs for different stakeholder groups, including areas of conflict/crossoverinform development of other work packages, especially WP4brought a clearer focus upon learned societies and their concerns about OA open resource outlining perceptions, attitudes and concerns of different stakeholder groups for other projects or bodies moving into this areaclear delineation of areas of conflict, misconception or confusion about OA books among various stakeholders for other projects or bodies moving into this area
  • 4: In depth surveys, interviews and case studies HSS researcher survey: 690 usable responses from HSS researchersverify and expand on focus group findings to test wider extent of knowledge, concerns, behaviours, benefits and aspirations for open access monograph publication and views on the wider scholarly environment inform development of later work packages e.g. WP11raise profile of project with academics and other stakeholders unique insight into the views and values of HSS researchers, openly available to any bodies, projects or institutions who could use it to inform work with researchersif we can re-run it, as we hope to do, evidence about the change in attitudes and opinions among HSS researchers during the period of RCUK mandate implementationFirst iteration fully complete and available on the project website. We would like to repeat at the end of the project (Y3&4)
  • Learned society case studies: 2 case studies, each involving 6 interviews with learned society officers across a range of functions responding to need identified in WP3, improving the project’s understanding of the role of learned societies in monograph publishing, and possible impact of OA on their business modclear message that this project is consulting with learned societies in an area (OA) where they have previously felt less involved than they would likeinform development of later work packages e.g. WP7 provides unique in-depth evidence base about learned society operations and how publishing interacts with other disciplinary support activities which can be used by other bodies seeking to work in this area- increased clarity for anyone working in this area without a clear understanding of how learned societies operate- information that should help protect learned societies and their business models in future- offers participant societies an opportunity to reflect upon and develop their approach to OA - Royal Historical Society case study with interviewees for approval and will be published mid-MarchRegional Studies Association interviews in progress and case study will be published in AprilMay broaden findings with a survey of HSS learned societies, depending upon outcome of case studies and steering group advice
  • Institutional case studies: 4 case studies of institutions from different mission groups, interviewing 4-6 individuals from different parts of the institution in each case - better understanding of the environment that researchers are operating within, policies and messages that they will be receiving from employers- Understanding challenges and potential blockages within institutions which may prevent successful implementation of OA monographs or policies about OA monographs- inform the development of later work packages e.g. WP7 - explore the possibility of Green OA for monographsidentify areas for national or international collaboration or support services to improve efficiency, discoverability and long-term availability for OA monographs case studies which can be used by other institutions addressing similar issues to inform their own policy and development; in particular, areas where people from different parts of the institution need to join up their thinking and actions- increased clarity for researchers seeking to publish an OA monograph on the issues their employing institution might be facing- institutions identified, interviews will commence in April
  • Publisher interviews: interviews with 8-10 publishers, including open access publishers and university presses: 1-3 people within each publisher - move beyond the publishers in the pilot to take account of the broader publishing environment- understanding the attitudes and processes that might prevent a viable open access monograph publishing route for researchers who want or need to take it- explore the possibility of Green OA for monographs- inform development of later work packages e.g. WP7identify areas for national or international collaboration or support services to improve efficiency, discoverability and long-term availability for OA monographs - open resource identifying good and bad practice so that new market entrants (OA publishers, university presses) can provide sustainable OA monograph routes for researchersidentification of cross-industry issues where other players need to develop their systems in order to permit effective OA (e.g. retailers, aggregators) - publishers identified, interviews will commence in April
  • Funder interviews: with HeFCE, AHRC, ESRC, Wellcome Trust, EU and NEH - ensure project remains agile in view of developing funder interest in this area- discuss and capture aspirations for OA monographs within policy developments- opportunity to reflect on processes for implementationinform development of later work packages e.g. WP7 openly-available information for all stakeholders on funder priorities for OA monographs to inform policy and practice funders identified, interviews will begin in May
  • Experiment with 29 pairs of titles to track differences in sales and usage between OA and control group titles- identify what happens in a real-world scenario where traditional publishers attempt to incorporate an OA model into their existing workflows- explore the difference between sales and usage of OA and control group books to inform business model developmentexplore effects on both front- and back-list titles to see whether OA can reinvigorate usage and sales of older booksopenly accessible information (which would usually be considered commercially sensitive by publishers) about sales and usage to inform new market entrants including university and researcher presses and consortia as well as traditional publishers who are considering offering an OA model for researchers to use templates and protocols for data collection established, baseline, 6 month and year 1 data collected- further rounds of data collection and analysis at end of years 2 and 3. identify areas where third parties (especially aggregators and retailers) need to adapt systems and processes to support an OA model transparent view of the challenges of implementing an OA stream into a publisher’s existing workflow, and overview of how to do this successfully, useful for any new market entrants including researcher and university presses
  • 10: Infographics Workshops and survey with authors and publishers to map monograph publishing process from start to finish- address issues identified in WP3 about lack of clarity for different stakeholders about their relation to other stakeholders in the publishing process- identifies key differences between OA and traditional publishing processes- provides information for researchers and institutions considering setting up their own OA presses, identified as necessary in WP3may provide additional information to support development of WP7transparent view of activities of authors and publishers towards producing a monograph- shows new market entrants (researcher and institutional presses) what must be done and where to focus their efforts if seeking to publish books- shows traditional publishers areas where OA presses are gaining efficiencies (if any), thereby potentially reducing APCs - initial workshops with researchers and publishers run and findings analysed- verification planned through publisher interviews and open online review- verified information will be used to create an infographic
  • 11: Creative Commons guide Short guide for researchers seeking to publish OA monographs on CC licences address issues identified in WP3 and WP4 (researcher survey) around researcher lack of awareness and concern about CC licencesbring Creative Commons into the stakeholder group for the project widely-available resource which may have value beyond monographspromote understanding of CC through a quick reference guide which can help raise the profile of CC and OA more generally key areas identifiedQ&A’s to be written and answered, reviewed by researchers and legal experts, and then designed and publishedlaunch at OA monograph conference
  • What about business models – a major period of experimentationTalk a little about the different business models and options being explored1. Open Access PDF: Author pays fee to the publisher to cover only the costs associated with publishing an Open Access PDF of the monograph (not any associated print or other electronic format costs). The publisher is free to sell the print and other electronic formats such as epub, kindle edition. This model recognises that publishers will still need to produce print copies which many academics still prefer. Revenue generated through sales may support the reduction of the open access fee. Who is exploring this model? Two major initiaitves, OAPEN-UK (Jisc and AHRC funded) and OAPEN-NL are both testing this model and collaborating with publishers to evaluate any impact of the free OA PDF on print / electronic sales and to analyse usage and citations. Participating publishers in these projects include: Palgrave, Taylor & Francis, Bloomsbury, Liverpool University Press, University Wales Press, Brill, Springer, and Amsterdam University Press amongst others. The projects aim to identify and test what a relevant and affordable ‘fee’ for the OA PFD based on real data collected from over 60 open access books all available on the OAPEN Library. An early look at the OAPEN-NL data suggests that for an average monograph, including all the standard quality checks such as peer review, a publisher would need to charge around EUR 6,000 to cover the costs associated with an open access version.  SpringerOpen also uses this model – the PDF (chapter by chapter) is available to download for free and the whole book is also viewable online. The epub and print are for sale. In their model, the open access fee is about EUR 15,000 but varies by number of pages. Manchester University Press also offers a gold option that charges £5,900 for titles up to 80,000 words going up to £7700 for 120 – 140,000 words. Discounts are available to authors who prepare press-ready files to their specification. 2. Open Access all e-formats: Author pays fee to the publisher to release the monograph in open access in all electronic formats (including epub). The publisher offers print versions for sale. This model is based on the principle that all electronic versions should be open access and whilst print is available to purchase for those that prefer it, assumes low print sales. Who is exploring this model? Palgrave is applying this model ‘Palgrave Open’ to their monographs and their ‘Pivot’ titles and charge an open access publication charge of £11,000 for a monograph and £7,500 for a pivot title. The charge takes into account all the costs involved in publishing including editorial, quality processes etc. Palgrave expects that this model will mostly be used by those that have received research council funding. PalgraveOpen is one of the first traditional publishers to apply the CC BY licence. Ubiquity Press, a fully open access publisher, also make all electronic formats of the monograph available online with a print on demand option. Their model is based on a chapter processing charges of around £150 and an XML first workflow to keep the production costs efficient. The profit from the print on demand is shared with the author or re-invested into new titles. 3. Open Access HTML: The publisher makes the HTML version of the monograph available online in open access at no charge to the author. Only the HTML version is free to view online. Charges are made to download the title in various formats including PDF, epub and print.  Who is exploring this model?One the very first to use this model was Bloomsbury Academic who provides the online html version for free and charges around £50 for the print / epub versions. Open Humanities Press was launched in 2008 by a group of international scholars, librarians and publishers and in 2009 they started publication of open access monographs. A particularly innovative born OA press, Open Humanities Press collaborates with the University of Michigan Library (MPublishing) and makes use of the Public Knowledge Project Open Monograph Press software system. Scholars work on book series and act as editors, select the manuscripts and oversee the series. The monographs are then published in open access in HTML and in most cases the PDF is also freely available. Print and electronic editions are sold at reasonable prices to cover the production costs, pay author royalties and to subsidise other titles. As a born OA publisher, Open Humanities Press explores new modes of publishing, peer review and leverages technology to create new forms of monographs, including their living books series which was Jisc funded. Open Book Publishers, who has recently one the Brill and IFLA award for open access, in another born OA publisher that uses HTML model. Founded by academics from Cambridge University, Open Book Publishers will publish the online html version at no charge, but does ask authors that if they are able to apply for publication grants from their university and elsewhere to contribute towards the costs which average between £3,000 and £5,000, that they do so to help sustain their operations (they will also make the PDF free in this case). In their model, they offer all versions for download, often with modest fees such as £5 for electronic versions and £10 - £20 for print editions. Open Book Publishers, by maximising on digital workflows is able to keep the costs low but keep quality high. 4. Crowdfunded Open Access: The publisher applies a crowdfunding model to hit a target price at which point the title is released in open access in all electronic formats. Crowdfunding is when people collectively pool their money to support an initiative. This model is mostly being used to release older back list titles. Who is exploring this model?Two publishers, Open Book Publishers and De Gruyter, have been experimenting in this area in partnership with Unglue.it. a crowdfunding ebook platform. Unglue.it works with the publisher to agree a price at which a digital edition of the monograph will be released in open access. De Gruyter has selected 100 titles from its e-dition series and each individual title that raises $2,100 at Unglue.it will be made available in open access. Before a campaign can start, the title has to receive 50 wishes. Open Book Publishers has successfully used the crowdfunding model to ‘unglue’ two titles.5. Freemium membership Open Access: In this model, the publisher or platform provider combines open access and paid for services to generate income to give back to the content providers and to contribute to the sustainability of the platform. It is similar to the model used by Open Book Publishers and Bloomsbury Academic where the HTML version is open access, except there is an additional membership element where members, (mainly libraries), pay an annual fee which provides them with free access to all other electronic formats including epub and makes the previously paid for services (e.g. MARC records) free. There is no charge to the author. Who is exploring this model?OpenEdition is one of the key providers of this model with their platform OpenEdition books. OpenEdition works with its publisher partners (university press, private publishers and learned societies) to make available titles in open access using the freemium model. All titles are available in open access as HTML files. Libraries that become members can either acquire the PDF or epub versions for their members to have free access to, or they can acquire the books in all formats. They can do this through individual selection, packages and also choose from subscription or perpetual access with local hosting rights. The revenue generated through model this is shared with the publisher. This model requires no payment of open access fees by the author, or be readers within an institution and Jisc Collections has just completed an agreement with OpenEdition [link to follow] for UK universities and colleges. 6. Consortia Open Access: Another model that focuses on the library rather than charging the author, this model leverages efficiencies through libraries grouping together to meet the price the publisher has agreed is required to release the monograph in open access in digital formats. It is quite similar to the freemium model as a base. Who is exploring this model?Knowledge Unlatched is a global library consortium. It is based on the fixed costs (costs associated with getting to first digital copy) of publishing a monograph, what the model calls a ‘Title Fee’. The publisher offers their book through Knowledge Unlatched and determines the Title Fee which, upon payment, will trigger the publisher to ‘unlatch’ the title and make it available as open access in HTML. Libraries, which join up to the global consortium decide which titles they wish to unlatch and contribute to the Title Fee – the more libraries in the consortium, the lower the cost as the Title Fee is shared by more libraries. In addition, as members, libraries will receive additional discounts on the hardback and premium ebook versions of titles that each library chooses to ‘unlatch’. The pilot for this model is about to commence and like OAPEN-UK and OAPEN-NL, will be working to evaluate what an affordable Title Fee will be for libraries. As with the other library models, the author is not charged a fee to make their book available in open access, however they do have to choose a publisher that part of Knowledge Unlatched.In addition to these models, there are initiatives such as MPublishing where the library at the University of Michigan is acting as a publisher to support the communications needs of scholars, and to publish, promote, and preserve the scholarly record.  The variety of models being explored reflects the recognition that funding in HSS is not straight forward, that the monograph business model is in a delicate balance and that affordability and sustainability are critical factors in any move to a gold open access environment. It’s not business as usual.http://www.jisc.ac.uk/inform/inform37/OpenAccessMonographs.html#.UmPRnlMUOSo
  • After the OAPEN-UK section, talk about what researchers need to be considering and what they need to know - OAPEN Library - DOAB - Standards being developed - What is currently on offer - KU, OUP, CUP, LUP, Palgrave - What next?
  • Transcript

    • 1. Open Access (OA) Monographs – Why, How and What Next? Caren Milloy , JISC Collections @oapenuk #oapenuk
    • 2. Why monographs & why OA? • 2/3rd of AHRC funded outputs are monographs and edited collections • Standard against which performance and standing of researcher is measured • Sales decline from 2000 to 200 max • What does this mean for scholarship? • Need to demonstrate impact and reach • Could OA make scholarship better?
    • 3. OA monograph research • SEP 08: OAPEN Project • OCT 10: OAPEN-UK funded by AHRC and Jisc • JUN 12: The “Finch” report excluded monographs but noted: ‘universities, funders, publishers, and learned societies should continue to work together to promote further experimentation in open access publishing for scholarly monographs’ • MAY 13: Wellcome Trust only funder to mandate OA monographs / chapters • JUL 13: HEFCE Post 2014 REF consultation: noted the OAPEN-UK project and excluded monographs • SEP 13: Jisc National Monographs Strategy Project • NOV 13: HEFCE Open Access Monograph Reference Group
    • 4. Main issues to explore • • • • • • • • Academic reaction – perception and attitudes Quality of content and processes (peer review) Assessment and career progression Fears over Creative Commons Business models and funding Standards adoption – access, preservation UK v International Will the monograph continue to exist?
    • 5. • OAPEN-UK is an innovative and highly consultative project – working in an area where little research exists and connecting with all the key stakeholders to identify and discuss concerns, challenges, perceptions and opportunities related to a transition to open access monographs. OAPEN-UK recognises that open access will require changes to current working practice as well as cultural change and that resistance to change is inevitable. By working with each stakeholder and sharing findings between stakeholders, the project promotes understanding and knowledge and enables stakeholders to make informed decisions based on evidence, rather than assumptions.
    • 6. 76 HSS titles: 2006 - 2013 Experimental Group (38 titles) OA with CC licence OAPEN Library Publishers website Institutional Repository Google Books (100%) Control Group (38 titles) Standard e-book agreements Publishers website E-book aggregators Google Books (10%) Print version available for sale E-book device friendly version available for sale OUP, Palgrave, T&F, UWP, LUP, Bloomsbury @oapenuk #oapenuk
    • 7. The research programme 1.How policies, processes and mechanisms need to change in order to enable OA publication of monographs? 2.What are the measurable effects of a move to OA monographs? 3.How do perceptions of OA monograph publication change among participants during the project? @oapenuk #oapenuk
    • 8. Research process Initiation OAPEN-UK Research Plan Year 1 11/12 Ellen Collins, Research Information Network Year 2 12/13 Year 3 13/14 project close http://www.flickr.com/photos/stewart/461099066/ 2015
    • 9. WP1: Literature Review Literature Review available and stay up to date with our Diigo Group: OAPEN-UK http://oapenuk.jiscebooks.org/furt her-reading/
    • 10. WP2. Annual Benchmarking Baseline survey will provide benchmark to measure how the perceptions and attitudes of project participants change over the course of the project Baseline results are available at: http://oapenuk.jiscebooks.org/researchfindings/benchmarkingsurvey/ 2nd Benchmarking survey results available by end of Oct 13
    • 11. WP3. Focus groups 1. Institutional representatives including librarians, institutional repository staff, research managers 2. Publishers 3. Learned Societies 4. Researchers (as both authors & readers) 5. E-book aggregators 6. Research Funders http://oapenuk.jiscebooks.org/researchfindings/y1-initial-focus-groups/
    • 12. WP4. In-depth surveys, interviews & case studies HSS Survey March to May 2012: 690 usable responses from HSS researchers • 53% are awareness of OA & 38% familiar with OA • Around 50% of researchers think it is ok to make a profit from OA publishing as long as that profit goes back into supporting the discipline or making more OA content available – 20% think you can make a profit and use it however you like and 20% think that you can make a profit but only to cover costs • Almost 60% of researchers are aware of Creative Commons but 40% are not & 80% prefer CC BY-NC-ND • CC BY-ND is preferred over CC BY-NC • Researchers value the distribution and marketing services of publishers the most – oh and that they give them a print book at the end! • Of the 397 that had published a mono, book chapter or co-authored a mono since 2000, 45% said that their research was underpinned by core university funds, 22% from RCUK and 20% from another funder • Perception of the 690 is that open access will have negative impacts on quality, reputation and reward but will be brilliant for availability and efficiency
    • 13. WP4. In-depth surveys, interviews & case studies Learned Society Case Studies 1. Royal Historical Society 2. Regional Studies Association Improve understanding of role of learned societies in monograph publishing and impact of OA on their business model and the service they provide to HSS
    • 14. WP4. In-depth surveys, interviews & case studies Institutional Case Studies with 4 UK HEIs • Better understanding of the environment that researchers are operating within, policies and messages that they will be receiving from employers • Understanding challenges and potential blockages within institutions which may prevent successful implementation of OA monographs or policies about OA monographs
    • 15. WP4. In-depth surveys, interviews & case studies Publisher Interviews with 8 – 10 publishers including OA and UPs • move beyond the publishers in the pilot to take account of the broader publishing environment • understanding the attitudes and processes that might prevent a viable open access monograph publishing route for researchers who want or need to take it • explore the possibility of Green OA for monographs
    • 16. WP4. In-depth surveys, interviews & case studies Funder Interviews with HEFCE, AHRC, ESRC, Wellcome Trust, EU and NEH • ensure project remains agile in view of developing funder interest in this area • discuss and capture aspirations for OA monographs within policy developments • opportunity to reflect on processes for implementation
    • 17. WP5. The Pilot • Two years of data collected • Have some lessons learned to share: – Implementation issues re integrating OA into ‘traditional’ workflows – Discovery and transparency of OA content (metadata) – Supply chain issues (ONIX, Amazon)
    • 18. WP10. Infographics Mapping the monograph publishing process from start to finish- a transparent view of activities of authors and publishers towards producing a monograph • address issues identified in WP3 about lack of clarity for different stakeholders about their relation to other stakeholders in the publishing process • identifies key differences between OA and traditional publishing processes • provides information for those considering setting up their own OA presses
    • 19. WP11. A Guide to Creative Commons for HSS Authors An introductory guide for HSS researchers to creative commons, copyright and open access • Help increase awareness and understanding of CC • Help make informed decisions • Based on the concerns raised in the HoL, BIS, LS letters, blogs and our research
    • 20. Open Access Monographs in HSS Conference http://www.jisc-collections.ac.uk/JISC-Collectionsevents/oabooksconf/
    • 21. Business models OA PDF: OAPEN-UK, OAPEN-NL, Springer, MUP Crowdfunded OA: OBP, De Gruyter OA all formats: Palgrave, Ubiqity press Freemium membership OA: OpenEdition OA HTML: OBP, Bloomsbury Academic Consortia OA: Knowlede Unlatched http://www.jisc.ac.uk/inform/inform37/OpenAccessMonographs.html#.UmPRnl MUOSo
    • 22. 5 take-aways for researchers 1. Know your rights and understand Creative Commons licensing 2. Engage as much as possible in internal and external discussions 3. Visit the Directory of Open Access Books (DOAB) & OAPEN Library 4. Experiment now & support early career academics 5. Participate in our next OAPEN-UK survey!
    • 23. Thank you & Further Info OAPEN-UK website: http://oapenuk.jiscebooks.org/ Caren Milloy c.milloy@jisccollections.ac.uk Twitter: @oapenuk Twitter: @carenmilloy Diigo Group: OAPEN-UK @oapenuk #oapenuk

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