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Portraits from Pakistan (part2)
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Portraits from Pakistan (part2)

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find the link to download this presentation on my blog : http://nubiagroup-powerpoint-collection.blogspot.com/

find the link to download this presentation on my blog : http://nubiagroup-powerpoint-collection.blogspot.com/

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Portraits from Pakistan (part2) Presentation Transcript

  • 1.  
  • 2. Muhammed Muheisen / AP A Pakistani vendor holds his balloons while sitting in a Taxi driving along a road in preparation for Valentine's Day in Islamabad, Pakistan, Sunday, Feb. 13.
  • 3. Rehan Khan / EPA - Members of Pakistan's Hindu minority pray for victory for their team Pakistan in the semi-finals of the Cricket World Cup during a collective prayer ceremony, in Karachi, Pakistan on March 29.
  • 4. Roshan Ali, 60, stands in front of the remains of his home in Pakistan's Sindh Province Roshan, aged 60, stands in front of the remains of his home in a remote village in Pakistan's Sindh Province. His house was badly damaged by flood water that swept through the village in August 2010, and although it is still standing, it is structurally unsafe, with huge cracks running through the walls. - He and his family returned to their village when the water receded in October 2010, but have been sleeping outside their house in a tent since then, as they are scared that the house will collapse. Ali's beard and chest hair are dyed with henna, a traditional practice amongst muslim men in Sindh and across Pakistan. Picture: Department for International Development/Russell Watkins
  • 5. At their peak the flood waters were up to 20 feet deep in Sindh A man points to the level that the water came up to on the side of his home when floods swept through his village in Pakistan's Sindh province in August 2010. - The fields in the background are still flooded, under three feet of water. At their peak, the flood waters were up to 20 feet deep. This man's house stands a good 10 feet above the ground water level, and the water came five feet up the wall. His fields are still under two feet of water. - mage: DFID/Vicki Francis - credit photo 'Department for International Development'.
  • 6. Collecting clean water with the help of UKaid People displaced by the 2010 flooding in Pakistan collect clean drinking water from a tapstand in the town of Ghari Kharo, in western Sindh Province. -Image: DFID/Russell Watkins source : Department for International Development'.
  • 7. Ashfaq sits waiting to see a doctor - Image: DFID/Russell Watkins - 'Department for International Development'. Ashfaq, aged 36, sits waiting to see a doctor at a mobile clinic in a remote village in Pakistan's Sindh province. "We're very happy to be able to see a doctor here in the village. Life has been hard since the floods. My house is ruined, and my daughter has been ill with diarrhoea. Apart from anything else, many people are feeling very depressed by what has happened."
  • 8. A young girl pictured at a mobile health clinic in Sindh, Pakistan – Image: DFID/Russell Watkins - 'Department for International Development'.
  • 9. Children collect clean water at a tap-stand Image: DFID/Russell Watkins - 'Department for International Development'.
  • 10. Zadi, with her son Tahir, Sindh, Pakistan - Image: DFID/Vicki Francis 'Department for International Development. Zadi, 35, with her two-year-old son Tahir. "The flood came in the middle of the night with no warning. We could only save ourselves." "We are glad to be back in our village now, but we have lost everything. We must be patient. This is a test from God."
  • 11. Munawar is twenty-five years old and has been married to her husband Rashid for four years. They have two daughters and a son, and live in Sindh province, Pakistan. - Sindh was badly affected by the devastating floods in July and August 2010 and, although the water is receding, parts of the province still remain underwater. - Thankfully Munawar and her family managed to escape the flood water but they've been struggling with fevers, flu and chest infections ever since. - Today they’re getting treatment as a mobile health clinic is in town, - Image: DFID/Vicki Francis - 'Department for International Development'.
  • 12. Long Khan and his family, Sindh province, December 2010 - Long Khan, aged 70, says that the flood came at four in the morning. He and his family had to move to a camp for two months and have only recently returned at the start of November. "We didn't have time to save our belongings or our livestock," he says. - "When we came back we had nothing and we were living under the sun, in the open.«  - - Image: DFID/Russell Watkins - 'Department for International Development'.
  • 13. Children in Sindh, Pakistan, play at a water pump in a village - Image: DFID/Russell Watkins - 'Department for International Development'
  • 14. Brothers Faisal (left, 6 yrs) and Amir (right, 7 yrs) below at their recently rehabilitated primary school in Muzaffargarh, Sindh. Their school was under water for more than a month during the flood, and has just been rehabilitated by Save the Children, who reinstalled electrics, toilets, safe drinking water, as well as repairing, cleaning, and repainting the building. credit photo 'Department for International Development'
  • 15. Long Khan, aged 70, says that the flood came at four in the morning. He and his family had to move to a camp for two months and have only recently returned at the start of November. - "We didn't have time to save our belongings or our livestock," he says. "When we came back we had nothing and we were living under the sun, in the open.«  credit photo 'Department for International Development'
  • 16. Nekbakhat, aged 50, had to flee her home with her husband and five children in the middle of the night when the flood came in August 2010. "Before the flood I was happy here. The water came in the middle of the night. It was difficult to escape in the dark. We were holding onto each other and crying.«  - "It is good now that we have clean water here again. Since we came back we had to go to the next village to get water, so now it is a little easier. The hygiene training has also been good, and it means that now there is no disease in the village". "The problem now is that we cannot grow rice or wheat to eat, not even fodder for the animals, as our fields are still flooded. The water is taking a long time to drain away". - credit photo 'Department for International Development'
  • 17. Punhal, aged 42, from a village near Jacobabad in Pakistan's Sindh province, says, "Before the flood, we were doing ok. We were cultivating wheat and rice, and were able to produce enough to sell some and store enough for the year«  - "The water came suddenly without warning. We used to have good houses here, but they were washed away. Now we are living in tents. We tried to save our animals, but we had to sell them to pay for transport to get to safety in Quetta.«  - "When we first came back to the village after two months away, there was no clean water, so people were getting sick. Now that we have clean water again thanks to Mercy Corps, it is much better." "When returned, we had no means to make any money. Until the stagnant water drains away, we can't plant seed again. I'm hoping to get some work on a cash-for-work scheme, so that we can buy some seed.«  - credit photo 'Department for International Development'
  • 18. Getty Images - Pakistani labourer sort onions at a vegetable market in Lahore on April 5, 2011. Pakistan's government has pushed food prices too high for an impoverished population, as malnutrition levels rise despite the recovery of crops after devastating floods, a UN food relief official said.
  • 19. Reuters Pictures -A flood victim drinks water from a hand pump in Murad Chandio village, some 35 km (22 miles) from Dadu in Pakistan's Sindh province, January 26, 2011. Six months after Pakistan's epic floods demolished this farming village in the southern province of Sindh, its residents still live in limbo on a roadside. Picture taken on January 26, 2011.
  • 20. Reuters Pictures - A newborn baby girl, who has yet to be given a name, sleeps in a makeshift tent after her family of flood victims returned to their village of Adam Khan, some 30 km (19 miles) from Dadu in Pakistan's Sindh province, January 27, 2011. Six months after the floods raged through Pakistan, victims of one of the country's worst natural disasters are still heavily dependent on aid agencies.
  • 21. AP Photo - Afghan refugee girls pose for a picture while playing on a railway track, on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, Monday, April 4, 2011.
  • 22. AP Photo Adar Gul, 80, an elderly Afghan refugee, arranges bricks while working in a brick factory on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, Friday, April 1, 2011.
  • 23. AP Photo An Afghan refugee girl prepares to perform during an event organized by the Hashoo foundation, in a tent at their camp on the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, Thursday, Feb. 10, 2011. The Hashoo Foundation is an economic and social development agency that operates as an entity in its own right. It is both non-profit as well as non-partisan, and works with multiple stakeholders and communities irrespective of their race, caste, faith or creed.
  • 24. AP Photo An Afghan refugee girl holds a baby goat while playing with other children in an alley of a slum in the outskirts of Islamabad, Pakistan, Monday, March 21, 2011.
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  • 29. 11-year-old Pakistani Saken Bashir sells camel milk by the roadside on the outskirts of Islamabad. (AP / Muhammed Muheisen)
  • 30. Afghan refugee in the alley slums on the outskirts of Islamabad. (AP / Nathalie Bardou)
  • 31. Afghan refugee in the slums of Islamabad. (AP / Nathalie Bardou)
  • 32. Pakistani cobbler sews a bag with his tray of goods in Islamabad. (AP / Anjum Naveed)
  • 33. young Pakistani and coated with oil lamps made of clay, which supposedly cures the disease in the local church in Islamabad. (AP / BKBangash)
  • 34. Two Pakistani sell shoes on the roadside on the outskirts of Islamabad. (AP / Muhammed Muheisen)
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  • 51. Trees cocooned in spiders webs, an unexpected side effect of the flooding in Sindh, Pakistan An unexpected side-effect of the flooding in parts of Pakistan has been that millions of spiders climbed up into the trees to escape the rising flood waters. Because of the scale of the flooding and the fact that the water has taken so long to recede, many trees have become cocooned in spiders webs. People in this part of Sindh have never seen this phenonemon before - but they also report that there are now less mosquitos than they would expect, given the amoungt of stagnant, standing water that is around. It is thought that the mosquitos are getting caught in the spiders web thus reducing the risk of malaria, which would be one blessing for the people of Sindh, facing so many other hardships after the floods. - Picture: Russell Watkins/Department for International Development
  • 52. Trees cocooned in spiders webs, an unexpected side effect of the flooding in Sindh, Pakistan
  • 53. Trees cocooned in spiders webs, an unexpected side effect of the flooding in Sindh, Pakistan .
  • 54. Trees cocooned in spiders webs, an unexpected side effect of the flooding in Sindh, Pakistan
  • 55. Trees cocooned in spiders webs, an unexpected side effect of the flooding in Sindh, Pakistan
  • 56. Trees cocooned in spiders webs, an unexpected side effect of the flooding in Sindh, Pakistan
  • 57. A presentation by Nubia Nubia _group@ yahoo . fr http:// nubiagroup - powerpoint -collection. blogspot . com / http://groups. yahoo . com /group/ Nubia _group_ Powerpoint _Collection/