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LIBYA Massive Exode and UN Sanctions
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LIBYA Massive Exode and UN Sanctions

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find the link to download this presentation on my blog : http://nubiagroup-powerpoint-collection.blogspot.com/

find the link to download this presentation on my blog : http://nubiagroup-powerpoint-collection.blogspot.com/

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  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
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  • mercu cher Bernard :)
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  • Thanks dear Bala :)))
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  • Take Care Nubia, may you have a wonderful Vacation, Enjoy yourself!
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  • Intéressante présentation chère Nubia...Tout comme l’on parle de l’échelle de Richter pour mesurer l’intensité d’un séisme, on pourra presque calculer l’intensité de la répression libyenne avec le nombre de personnes ayant prit la route de l’exode. Selon les douaniers tunisiens et égyptiens, plusieurs dizaines de milliers de libyens auraient déjà traversé la frontière. “300.000 autre seraient certainement déjà sur les routes, ” explique le Ministère italien des Affaires Etrangères. Merci mon amie de nous sensibiliser à ces drames humains... Bises. Bernard
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LIBYA Massive Exode and UN Sanctions LIBYA Massive Exode and UN Sanctions Presentation Transcript

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  • Massive exode from Libya - The unanimous UN sanctions targets five members of the Gaddafi family. As more cities fall into the hands of the pro-democracy protesters, Muammar Gaddafi, the Libyan leader, is hanging on to the capital where security forces loyal to him seem to have a firm hold, even amid reports of sporadic gunfire. On Sunday, protesters had reportedly taken over the towns of Misurata and Zawiyah, further shrinking the control of Gaddafi's government. However, tanks were surrounding Zawiyah, 50km from Tripoli, and locals feared an imminent raid by pro-Gaddafi forces. Diplomats say about 2,000 or more people have been killed across the country. 'Transitional government' Meanwhile, Libya's former justice minister announced he was forming a "transitional government" to replace Gaddafi's crumbling regime, which now controls only some western areas around the capital and a few long-time bastions in the arid south, reporters and witnesses say. Assets frozen : The UN Security Council imposed a travel and assets ban on Gaddafi's government and, with exceptional unanimity, ordered an investigation into possible crimes against humanity by the Libyan strongman UN sanctions: Who is targeted? The unanimous UN sanctions targets five members of the Gaddafi family. The United Nations Security Council has unanimously imposed "biting sanctions" on Muammar Gaddafi, the Libyan leader, and four of the most influential members of his immediate family. Resolution 1970 included a travel ban and asset freeze on the following Libyan figures: Muammar Gaddafi, the Libyan leader, took power in 1969 in a bloodless coup. In recent days, Gaddafi has lost control of much of the country as protesters have fought against security forces that remain loyal to him. Many members of his regime - including diplomats, military personnel and members of government - have defected. Saif al-Islam Gaddafi, Muammar Gaddafi's second-oldest son, has been accused of inciting violence. He is the second most visible face of the Libyan regime. Saif al-Islam was, until he played a key role in the regime's attempts to suppress the protest movement, viewed as a potential ally by many in the West, who considered him the most inclined to reform and open the country. Saadi Gaddafi, the leader's third son, is being targeted for his role as the commander of the country's special forces, which have been cracking down on the protesters. As well as playing a supportive role in his father's government, the leader's third son has also been captain of the Libyan football team. He played for Italy's Perugia club, until he tested positive for performance-inducing steroids after just one match. Khamis Gaddafi, heads the Khamis Brigade, an army special forces brigade that is equipped with sophisticated weaponry. Aisha Gaddafi is the leader's only daughter. Few days ago, she denied fleeing the countryon Libyan state television. Aisha is a lawyer and was a member of Saddam Hussein's defence team in 2004. The UN dropped her as a goodwill ambassador this week.
  • An image grab taken from Libyan state television on Friday, Feb. 25 shows Libyan leader Moammer Gadhafi gesturing at supporters during an address at the Green Square in Tripoli. Gadhafi told his supporters to "prepare to defend Libya.«  - Libyan-TV / AFP - Getty Images
  • Libyan U.N. ambassador Shalgham is embraced by Dabbashi, Libya's deputy U.N. Ambassador after denouncing Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi for the first time during a Security Council meeting at United Nations headquarters Feb. 25 in New York City. Shalgam, a longtime friend and member of Gadhafi's inner circle, had previously refused to denounce Gadhafi.-Staff / Reuters
  • Former military officers are welcomed by the anti-Gadhafi protesters in Benghazi Friday, Feb. 25. Libya's rebel-held city of Benghazi has filled a political void with a coalition which is cleaning up, providing food, building defences, reassuring foreign oil firms and telling Tripoli it believes in one nation. Weapons used in bloody clashes with pro-Gadhafi forces were collected and African mercenaries the coalition says the Libyan leader used to fire on protesters were in jail awaiting trial. The city paid a high price for the revolt with up to 250 dead. - Suhaib Salem / Reuters
  • Passengers disembark from the U.S. chartered ferry Maria Dolores, which was carrying hundreds of Americans and other evacuees from Tripoli, after arriving in Valletta's Grand Harbour Friday, Feb. 25. - Darrin Zammit Lupi / Reuters
  • Evacuees from different countries queue to board a ship to be evacuate from Benghazi sea port, Libya, on Friday Feb. 25. Tens of thousands of foreigners are trying to flee Libya, with Turks and Chinese climbing aboard ships by the thousands. Europeans are mostly boarding evacuation flights while North Africans have been racing to border crossings in overcrowded vans. - Hussein Malla / AP
  • Libyans perform Friday prayers outside the courthouse in the eastern city of Benghazi, Libya, on Friday, Feb. 25. Gianluigi Guercia / AFP - Getty Images
  • Around 8,000 people gathered for midday prayers outside the Benghazi courthouse Friday. A local imam delivered his sermon alongside the coffins of three men killed in the violent uprising that routed Moammar Gadhafi loyalists from Benghazi.
  • Friends and relatives carry the coffin of a man killed during clashes between Gadhafi's forces and anti-government protesters ahead of Friday prayers outside the courthouse in Benghazi. - Gianluigi Guercia / AFP - Getty Images LIBYA
  • Misrata’s international airport after an attack by security forces Thursday, according to Iman, a Libyan-American woman living in the city, which is Libya's third largest. - Courtesy of Iman LIBYA
  • Salum, Egypt — Egyptian guest workers board a bus to take them home as hundreds of vehicles jam the road out of strife-torn Libya.- PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times
  • Ras Ajdir, Tunisia — A car displaying support for the Libyan protests approaches the Libya-Tunisia border crossing at Ras Ajdir. PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times
  • FEBRUARY 25: Thousands of opposition supporters rally outside a courthouse in rebel-held Benghazi, Libya. (Tyler Hicks/The New York Times
  • Amr Nabil / AP An Egyptian raises Libya's old national flag in support of the uprising in Libya during a gathering at Tahrir Square, the focal point of the Egyptian uprising, in Cairo, Egypt on Feb. 25.
  • Yannis Behrakis / Reuters An Egyptian refugee enters a bus from the window at a refugee camp after crossing into Tunisia to flee the violence in Libya near the border crossing of Ras Jdir, Feb. 26. Thousands of Egyptian refugees scrambled to leave a refugee camp set up by the Tunisian army, as they waited to be transferred to the nearby airport to fly back home.
  • FEBRUARY 26: An Egyptian man climbs through a window into a bus to take him and others further inland, outside a refugee camp set up by the Tunisian army at the Tunisia-Libya border, in Ras Ajdir, Tunisia. The camp, which houses about 5,000 people, was built after shelters at the border couldn't handle the large numbers coming through. (Lefteris Pitarakis/Associated Press)
  • Foreigners continue to flee Libya, ships in Benghazi evacuate guest workers - PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times Ras Ajdir, Tunisia — Refugees wait with their bags amid the barren landscape near the Ras Ajdir border crossing into Tunisia from Libya. Buses are constantly streaming to the border to try to handle the growing flow of refugees.
  • Ras Ajdir, Tunisia — Refugees crowd onto a bus in Tunisia as they flee the violence in Libya. PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times
  • Ras Ajdir, Tunisia — A man tries to secure a seat on a bus headed into Tunisia by climbing in through a window, one of several who did so as they sought to flee the growing violence in Libya. - PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times
  • Ras Ajdir, Tunisia — People gathered on the Tunisian side of the border with Libya wave a pre-Kadafi flag from Libya as they protest his long rule over the country. -PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times
  • Ras Ajdir, Tunisia — Wind-blown dust envelopes refugees at the Ras Ajdir border crossing into Tunisia from Libya on Saturday. PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times
  • Ras Ajdir, Tunisia — Refugees wait with their bags amid the barren landscape near the Ras Ajdir border crossing into Tunisia from Libya. Buses are constantly streaming to the border to try to handle the growing flow of refugees. PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times
  • Benghazi, Libya — Guest workers seeking to flee Libya crowd toward the gangway of one of three ships evacuating foreigners at the port of Benghazi on Saturday february 26. PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times
  • Benghazi, Libya — Guest workers line up waiting to be evacuated by ship from the port of Benghazi on Saturday. PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times
  • Benghazi, Libya — Guest workers wait to be evacuated by ship from the port of Benghazi on Saturday.FEBRUARY 26 PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times
  • Benghazi, Libya — A man carries his baggage aboard a ship as others wait to leave Libya on Saturday FEBRUARY 26 PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times
  • Benghazi, Libya — Chinese nationals who had been working in Libya look down from the railing a ship as it prepares to depart the port of Benghazi on Saturday. PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times
  • Benghazi, Libya — A volunteer guards a helicopter at an air base in Benghazi PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times
  • Benghazi, Libya — A group of men pray at the graves of people who were killed in the recent violence surrounding the ouster of Moammar Kadafi's military and police forces from Benghazi. PHOTOGRAPH BY: Rick Loomis / Los Angeles Times
  • Benghazi, Libya — Libyan youths hold revolutionary flags against the breeze blowing ashore on the waterfront in Benghazi. PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times
  • Benghazi, Libya — Facing grim prospects for education and employment, Libya's youths have led the effort to end the 42-year reign of dictator Moammar Kadafi. - PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times
  • Benghazi, Libya — Artwork that mocks Libyan dictator Moammar Kadafi are posted on a booth along the Benghazi waterfront. PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times
  • Benghazi, Libya — Libyan youths wave revolutionary flags as dusk settles Saturday afternoon. February 26 PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times
  • Benghazi, Libya — Residents mill around the burned and ransacked internal security building late Saturday afternoon. February 26 PHOTOGRAPH BY: Luis Sinco / Los Angeles Times
  • John Moore / Getty Images Stranded Bangladeshi workers walk along the beach at the port of Benghazi after failing to get on an evacuation ship on Feb. 26 in Benghazi, Libya. Thousands of foreign laborers remain in Libya, stranded for days and unable to get transport out of the country. Fighting has continued around the capitol Tripoli still controlled by Gaddafi forces. The UN who is considering sanctions against Libya over its violent attempts to put down an uprising, estimates more than 1,000 people have died in the 10-day-old revolt.
  • Ahmed Jadallah / Reuters An Egyptian trying to leave Libya looks through the blankets of a makeshift shelter at Tripoli's airport Feb. 26.
  • Ahmed Jadallah / Reuters A crowd of people trying to leave Libya fills the departure hall at Tripoli's airport Feb. 26.
  • Ciro Fusco / EPA A man with an Egyptian passport carries his bleongings as thousands of Libyan, Egyptian, Tunisian and Indian refugees escape the forces of Muammar Gaddafi at Tas Jedir, Libya, on the border with Tunisia, Feb. 26. According to the United Nations Refugee Agency (UNHCR), some 16,000 people had fled over the Libyan border into Tunisia in recent days, as Libyan authorities launched a bloody crackdown on protests against the rule of Muammar Gadhafi.
  • Zohra Bensemra / Reuters Egyptians rush to take buses at the Libyan and Tunisian border crossing of Ras Jdir, after fleeing unrest in Libya, Feb. 26. People in Tunisia and Egypt are driving to the border to help those arriving from Libya, with many hosting strangers in their homes, international aid groups said on Friday. More than 30,000 people have streamed across land borders in response to violence in Libya, mainly Tunisians and Egyptians who had been working in the North African country, according to the International Organisation for Migration.
  • Gregorio Borgia / AP Chinese citizens wait aboard the "Palermo Grimaldi" ferry at the harbor in Valletta, Malta, Saturday, Feb. 26, after being evacuated from Benghazi, Libya. Tens of thousands of foreigners have been fleeing Libya this week. Turkish and Chinese workers climbed aboard ships by the thousands, Europeans mostly boarded evacuation flights and North Africans have been heading to Libya's borders with Egypt and Tunisia in overcrowded vans.
  • The brother of Salem Al-Moqlah, right, a Libyan who was killed in the recent clashes, mourns next to his grave in a cemetery in Benghazi, Feb . 26. - Suhaib Salem / Reuters
  • A man plays with his son in front of a cartoon depicting Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi in Benghazi, Feb. 26. - Goran Tomasevic / Reuters
  • A Libyan mourner collapses during the funeral of Anwar Elgadi, 44, who was killed the previous day by security forces, according to his brother Mohammed, in the Tajoora neighborhood of Tripoli, Feb. 26. - Ahmed Jadallah / Reuters
  • Getty Images - Refugees wait in line for transport after crossing the Ras Jedir border from Libya into Tunisia on February 27, 2011, near the Tunisian city of Ben Guerdane. More than 10,000 people fled Libya into Tunisia at the Ras Jedir post yesterday, most of them Egyptians, the Red Crescent said today, calling it a 'humanitarian crisis'.
  • Getty Images - The Italian warship San Giorgio arrives from Libya in the port of Catania on February 27, 2011. Italy has evacuated more than 1,000 of its citizens from the turmoil in Libya, the foreign ministry said on February 26. The evacuation effort 'has so far allowed more than 1,000 Italian citizens to return to Italy from Libya,' the ministry said in a statement.
  • Getty Images - Thousands of Egyptians wait to take transport at the Ras Jedir border crossing after fleeing Libya on February 27, 2011 near the Tunisian city of Ben Guerdane. More than 10,000 people fled Libya into Tunisia at the Ras Jedir post on Saturday, most of them Egyptians, the Red Crescent said today, calling it a 'humanitarian crisis'.
  • Getty Images Overseas Filipino workers (OFWs) from Libya fill in forms after their arrival at the Manila International Airport on February 27, 2011. A second batch of Filipino workers arrived home from violence-torn Libya as the Philippines' foreign secretary landed in Tunisia to help oversee evacuation plans for the thousands still stranded. A total of 168 Filipinos have so far arrived home, including a group of hotel and construction workers who landed in the capital Manila early Sunday, the foreign department said in a statement.
  • Reuters Pictures A Shiite Muslim supporter of Majlis e Wahdat e Islami holds up a poster depicting Libyan leader Muammar Gaddafi as he marches with others in support of the people of Libya, Tunisia, Bahrain, Egypt and Yemen during a rally in Karachi February 27, 2011.
  • Reuters Pictures - Men wait in line to board British Royal Navy HMS Cumberland frigate at Benghazi port February 27, 2011. The frigate is being used to evacuate British citizens and other nationals from Libya.
  • Reuters Pictures - British Royal Marines stand on the HMS Cumberland frigate at Benghazi port February 27, 2011. The frigate is being used to evacuate British citizens and other nationals from Libya.
  • Getty Images - Bangladeshi workers are stranded at the Giuliana pier in the port of Benghazi on February 27, 2011. Thousands of foreign workers fled Libya by air, land and sea the eve, in a vast exodus from the oil-rich North African state as terrified residents of Tripoli braced for a bloody showdown. In Bangladesh, hundreds of angry relatives of workers stranded in Libya blocked a key highway northeast of the capital Dhaka, accusing the government of dragging its heels in rescuing the estimated 60,000 Bangladeshis there.
  • Getty Images - Thousands of people wait to take the bus after fleeing from Libya, on February 27, 2011, at the Ras Jdir border post, near the Tunisian city of Ben Guerdane. More than 10,000 people fled Libya into Tunisia at the Ras Jedir post on February 26, most of them Egyptians, the Red Crescent said Sunday, calling it a 'humanitarian crisis'.'More than 10,000 people passed through Ras Jedir yesterday,' the organisation's regional president in Ben Guerdane, the main border town, Monji Slim said. More than 40,000 have come through this border post in the past week, including more than 15,000 Egyptians.
  • Getty Images Egyptian people carrying their belongings, run to take the bus after fleeing from Libya, on February 27, 2011, at the Ras Jedir border post, near the Tunisian city of Ben Guerdane. More than 10,000 people fled Libya into Tunisia at the Ras Jedir post on Saturday, most of them Egyptians, the Red Crescent said Sunday, calling it a 'humanitarian crisis'.'More than 10,000 people passed through Ras Jedir yesterday,' the organisation's regional president in Ben Guerdane, the main border town, Monji Slim said. More than 40,000 have come through this border post in the past week, including more than 15,000 Egyptians.
  • Getty Images Egyptians wait to take buses after fleeing from Libya, on February 27, 2011, at the Ras Jedir border post, near the Tunisian city of Ben Guerdane. More than 10,000 people fled Libya into Tunisia at the Ras Jedir post on Saturday, most of them Egyptians, the Red Crescent said Sunday, calling it a 'humanitarian crisis'.'More than 10,000 people passed through Ras Jedir yesterday,' the organisation's regional president in Ben Guerdane, the main border town, Monji Slim said. More than 40,000 have come through this border post in the past week, including more than 15,000 Egyptians.
  • Getty Images - Egyptian people carrying their belongings, run to take the bus after fleeing from Libya, on February 27, 2011, at the Ras Jedir border post, near the Tunisian city of Ben Guerdane. More than 10,000 people fled Libya into Tunisia at the Ras Jedir post on Saturday, most of them Egyptians, the Red Crescent said Sunday, calling it a 'humanitarian crisis'.'More than 10,000 people passed through Ras Jedir yesterday,' the organisation's regional president in Ben Guerdane, the main border town, Monji Slim said. More than 40,000 have come through this border post in the past week, including more than 15,000 Egyptians.
  • Reuters Pictures - Evacuees from Libya disembark at the port of Piraeus near Athens February 27, 2011. A passenger ferry with 390 evacuees from 17 countries, including Britain, the Netherlands, Germany, Portugal and Brazil arrived at Piraeus port early morning on Sunday after a 22-hour trip from the port town of Benghazi.
  • Getty Images - A ferry carrying 1749 foreigners from The Philipines, China, Morocco, Thailande, Brazil, Egypt, Vietnam arrive in the port of La Valetta, Malta, after being evacuated from Tripoli, Lybia, on Febrruary 27, 2011. A British warship and a Chinese-chartered ferry arrived in Malta on February 26 loaded with thousands of evacuees from Libya in an exodus of foreign nationals fleeing the oil-rich North African state.
  • AP Photo In this photo taken Saturday, Feb 26, 2011, a Bangladeshi woman reacts as she displays a document with a photograph of her husband believed to be trapped in violence stricken Libya during a protest at Bhairab, 35 kilometers (50 miles) north of Dhaka, Bangladesh. Hundreds of relatives of Bangladeshis working in Libya blocked a highway Saturday demanding that the Bangladeshi government take steps to ensure their security.
  • AP Photo - Libyans give out food during a protest in the eastern city of Benghazi, Libya, Saturday, Feb. 26, 2011. (AP Photo/Tara Todras-Whitehill.
  • Getty Images -Asian workers wait for evacuation on February 26, 2011 at the harbour of the Libyan port city of Benghazi, as thousands fled Libya in an exodus of foreign nationals escaping by air, land and sea amid fears of a full-blown civil war.
  • Getty Images - Asian workers wait for evacuation on February 26, 2011 at the harbour of the Libyan port city of Benghazi, as thousands fled Libya in an exodus of foreign nationals escaping by air, land and sea amid fears of a full-blown civil war.
  • Getty Images Asian workers wait for evacuation on February 26, 2011 at the harbour of the Libyan port city of Benghazi, as thousands fled Libya in an exodus of foreign nationals escaping by air, land and sea amid fears of a full-blown civil war.
  • AP Photo Chinese citizens wait aboard the "Palermo Grimaldi" ferry at the harbor in Valletta, Malta, Saturday, Feb. 26, 2011, after being evacuated from Benghazi, Libya. Tens of thousands of foreigners have been fleeing Libya this week. Turkish and Chinese workers climbed aboard ships by the thousands, Europeans mostly boarded evacuation flights and North Africans have been heading to Libya's borders with Egypt and Tunisia in overcrowded vans.
  • AP Photo - A man from India, who did not provide his name and who used to work in a construction company in Libya, stands in a refugee camp set up by the Tunisian army, after fleeing Libya at the Tunisia-Libya border, in Ras Ajdir, Tunisia, Saturday, Feb. 26, 2011. The camp, which houses about 5,000 people, was built after shelters at the border couldn't handle the large numbers coming through.
  • AP Photo - Libyan's hits a defaced billboard of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi during a demonstration against the regime in the city of Tobruk, eastern Libya, Saturday, Feb. 26, 2011.
  • AP Photo - In this image made available by Romania's Foreign Ministry, Romanian evacuees from Libya board a military airplane in Tripoli, Libya, that will take them back to Romania, Friday, Feb. 25, 2011. A total of 31 people, including 24 Romanians and 7 EU citizens, arrived in Bucharest early Saturday, Feb. 26, 2011 after being evacuated from Libya, according to the Romanian Defense Ministry.
  • AP Photo - Mourners carry the coffin at the funeral of Anwar Algadi, 44, who according to his brother Mohammed was killed Friday during clashes with pro-regime forces and according to a copy of his death certificate shown by the brother listed cause of death as "receiving a live bullet to the head", in the Tajoura district of eastern Tripoli, Libya, Saturday, Feb. 26, 2011. Residents there have blocked many streets with roadblocks after protesters demanding Moammar Gadhafi's ouster came under a hail of bullets Friday when pro-regime militiamen opened fire to stop the first significant anti-government marches in days in the Libyan capital.
  • AP Photo - A boy leaps over felled palm trees used as roadblocks by residents in the Tajoura district of eastern Tripoli, Libya, Saturday, Feb. 26, 2011. Residents there have blocked many streets with roadblocks after protesters demanding Moammar Gadhafi's ouster came under a hail of bullets Friday when pro-regime militiamen opened fire to stop the first significant anti-government marches in days in the Libyan capital.
  • AP Photo - Brazilian Ambassador to the United Nations Maria Luiza Ribeiro Viotti, right, listens as United Nations Secretary-General Ban Ki-moon addresses the Security Council after they voted on the peace and security in Africa, Saturday, Feb. 26, 2011 at U. N. headquarters. The U.N. Security Council met urgently Saturday to consider new sanctions against Libya to halt a violent crackdown on anti-government protesters, but members disagreed over a proposal to refer Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi and top aides to an international war crimes tribunal.
  • AP Photo United Nations Security Council vote on the peace and security in Africa, Saturday, Feb. 26, 2011 at U. N. headquarters. The U.N. Security Council met urgently Saturday to consider new sanctions against Libya to halt a violent crackdown on anti-government protesters, but members disagreed over a proposal to refer Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi and top aides to an international war crimes tribunal.
  • AP Photo - A Bangladeshi foreign worker who has been trying to leave Libya for over 4 days, stands near the water as he waits for word to be evacuated at the port in the eastern city of Benghazi, Libya, on Sunday Feb. 27, 2011. U.S. President Barack Obama has called on Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi to leave power immediately, saying he has lost the legitimacy to rule with his violent crackdown on his own people.
  • AP Photo - An anti-Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi gunman sits on a military vehicle as he celebrates the freedom of the Libyan city of Benghazi, Libya, on Sunday Feb. 27, 2011. US President Barack Obama has called on Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi to leave power immediately, saying he has lost the legitimacy to rule with his violent crackdown on his own people.
  • AP Photo Abdel-Hafidh Ghoga, the spokesman for the new council to govern liberated areas in Libya, holds a press conference after announcing the formation of the group, in the eastern city of Benghazi, Libya, Sunday, Feb. 27, 2011. U.S. President Barack Obama has called on Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi to leave power immediately, saying he has lost the legitimacy to rule with his violent crackdown on his own people.
  • AP Photo - Abdel-Hafidh Ghoga, the spokesman for the new council to govern liberated areas in Libya, holds a press conference after announcing the formation of the group, in the eastern city of Benghazi, Libya, Sunday, Feb. 27, 2011. U.S. President Barack Obama has called on Libyan dictator Moammar Gadhafi to leave power immediately, saying he has lost the legitimacy to rule with his violent crackdown on his own people.
  • AP Photo - A Libyan man holds a photo of a relative during a demonstration against Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi in Benghazi, in eastern Libya, Sunday, Feb. 27, 2011. Writing in Arabic below photograph reads, "Martyr Fathi Alfaitouri Moftah".
  • AP Photo -Residents lie in open graves and make the victory sign, to show their willingness to die, next to freshly-dug graves for recent victims, unseen, at a park in the main square in Zawiya, 30 miles (50 kilometers) west of Tripoli, in Libya Sunday, Feb. 27, 2011. Writing on placard in arabic reads "There is no God but Allah. Martyrs are God's beloved". Hundreds of armed anti-government forces backed by military defectors in Zawiya, the city closest to the capital Tripoli, prepared Sunday to repel an expected offensive by forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi who are surrounding the city.
  • AP Photo Pro-Gadhafi supporters atop a police vehicle honk horns and ride around chanting as they rally on a highway in Surman, west of Zawiya, 50 miles (80 kilometers) west of Tripoli, in Libya, Sunday, Feb. 27, 2011. Hundreds of armed anti-government forces backed by military defectors in Zawiya, the city closest to the capital Tripoli, prepared Sunday to repel an expected offensive by forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi who are surrounding the city.
  • AP Photo - A Libyan militia member from the forces against Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi guards three men, who they suspect to be mercenaries from Chad, center, after detaining them at a roadbloack near Marj in eastern Libya, Sunday, Feb. 27, 2011.
  • AP Photo Armed residents stand on top of a captured tank flying a flag of Libya's monarchy prior to Moammar Gadhafi's reign, in the main square in Zawiya, 30 miles (50 kilometers) west of Tripoli, in Libya Sunday, Feb. 27, 2011. Hundreds of armed anti-government forces backed by military defectors in Zawiya, the city closest to the capital Tripoli, prepared Sunday to repel an expected offensive by forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi who are surrounding the city.
  • AP Photo -Libyan pro-Gadhafi security forces man a checkpoint on the way to Zawiya, 30 miles (50 kilometers) west of Tripoli, in Libya, Sunday, Feb. 27, 2011. Hundreds of armed anti-government forces backed by military defectors in Zawiya, the city closest to the capital Tripoli, prepared Sunday to repel an expected offensive by forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi who are surrounding the city.
  • AP Photo - Residents beckon foreign journalists to come closer past barricades to see the situation in the main square in Zawiya, 30 miles (50 kilometers) west of Tripoli, in Libya Sunday, Feb. 27, 2011. Hundreds of armed anti-government forces backed by military defectors in Zawiya, the city closest to the capital Tripoli, prepared Sunday to repel an expected offensive by forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi who are surrounding the city.
  • AP Photo - Armed residents display their weapons in the main square in Zawiya, 30 miles (50 kilometers) west of Tripoli, in Libya Sunday, Feb. 27, 2011. Hundreds of armed anti-government forces backed by military defectors in Zawiya, the city closest to the capital Tripoli, prepared Sunday to repel an expected offensive by forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi who are surrounding the city.
  • AP Photo - A pro-Gadhafi youth riding in the back of a pickup truck brandishes a knife, as they ride up and down chanting at a rally on the highway in Surman, west of Zawiya, 50 miles (80 kilometers) west of Tripoli, in Libya, Sunday, Feb. 27, 2011. Hundreds of armed anti-government forces backed by military defectors in Zawiya, the city closest to the capital Tripoli, prepared Sunday to repel an expected offensive by forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi who are surrounding the city.
  • AP Photo - Pro-Gadhafi forces man a checkpoint on the outskirts of Zawiya, 30 miles (50 kilometers) west of Tripoli, in Libya Sunday, Feb. 27, 2011. Hundreds of armed anti-government forces backed by military defectors in Zawiya, the city closest to the capital Tripoli, prepared Sunday to repel an expected offensive by forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi who are surrounding the city..
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  • LIBYA - 2011 february 26
  • A presentation by Nubia [email_address] http://nubiagroup-powerpoint-collection.blogspot.com/ http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Nubia_group_Powerpoint_Collection /