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JAPAN two weeks later - 2011march 25

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  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
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  • @Joelalisen it's not only about MATERIAL things, but more about the HEALTH and LIFE destroyed - spirituality cannot give all answers alas !
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  • Material things are important yes!....but let,s not forget these are ALL temporary, and all rhese things will come to pass....and that we should not hold on to them as if they are our life.....There are things more important than them...things that we cannot see, but these things will last 'till eternity....SEARCH THEM!....
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  • Oui vraiment terrible ... et j'ai peur que le pire soit à venir.. :(
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  • Quelle terrible tragédie !
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JAPAN two weeks later -  2011march 25 JAPAN two weeks later - 2011march 25 Presentation Transcript

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  • JAPAN – 2011 march 25 Dangerous breach suspected at Japan nuke site Japan struggles to avert a nuclear disaster and care for millions of people without power or water after an earthquake and tsunami killed more than 20,000 people. Prime Minister Naoto Kan described the crisis as Japan’s worst since 1945: “The earthquake, tsunami and the nuclear incident have been the biggest crisis Japan has encountered in the 65 years since the end of World War II,” he said. "The situation today at the Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant is still very grave and serious. We must remain vigilant," Kan said. "We are not in a position where we can be optimistic. We must treat every development with the utmost care.«  A suspected breach in the core of a reactor at the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant could mean more serious radioactive contamination, Japanese officials revealed Friday, as the prime minister called the country's ongoing fight to stabilize the plant "very grave and serious." A somber Prime Minister Naoto Kan sounded a pessimistic note at a briefing hours after nuclear safety officials announced what could be a major setback in the urgent mission to stop the plant from leaking radiation, two weeks after a devastating earthquake and tsunami disabled it. workers hurt after wading into water 10,000 times more radioactive than normal The uncertain situation halted work at the nuclear complex, where dozens of workers had been trying feverishly to stop the overheated plant from leaking dangerous radiation. The plant has leaked some low levels of radiation, but a breach could mean a much larger release of contaminants. Suspicions of a possible breach were raised when two workers waded into water 10,000 times more radioactive than is typical and suffered skin burns, the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) said. 'Risking their lives' The prime minister also thanked utility workers, firefighters and military personnel for "risking their lives" to cool the overheated facility. Officials have previously said that small explosions at the reactor could have damaged it, but the high seepage of radiation could imply worse damage than previously believed. A rupture in a reactor would mean a serious reversal following days of slow progress in containing radiation leaks. More than 700 engineers have been working in shifts around the clock to stabilize the six-reactor complex.
  • Reuters Pictures - Handout photo from Tokyo Electric Power Co. shows worker attempting to repair power lines at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Tomioka, Fukushima Prefecture northeastern Japan March 18, 2011. Picture taken March 18, 2011. Mandatory credit. View slide
  • Reuters Pictures - Handout photo from Tokyo Electric Power Co. shows worker attempting to repair power lines at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Tomioka, Fukushima Prefecture northeastern Japan March 18, 2011. Picture taken March 18, 2011. View slide
  • An elderly woman cries in front of a destroyed building in the devastated town of Rikuzentakata in Iwate prefecture on March 19. National police said at least 18,000 were dead or missing in Japan's worst natural disaster in 88 years. (Nicholas Kamm/AFP/GettyImages)
  • Tayo Kitamura, 40, kneels in the street to caress and talk to the wrapped body of her mother Kuniko Kitamura, 69, after Japanese firemen discovered the dead woman inside the ruins of her home in Onagawa, Japan, Saturday, March 19. -David Guttenfelder / AP
  • Mark Baker / AP Computer laptops lie damaged on the floor of an airport building at Sendai Airport, March 19. The U.S. military have been asked to help clear the debris and get the airport fully operational as soon as possible.
  • About 1,200 people were trapped inside the Sendai Airport passenger terminal when the earthquake and resulting tsunami struck on March 11. They remained cut off from all outside contact and had to survive on their own for more than two days until help arrived. This panoramic image, made on March 17, shows the damage to the interior of the airport. (Masaki Furumaya / Sankei Shimbun / MSN Japan) Jiji Press / AFP - Getty Images - The damaged radar room in the control tower at the Sendai airport.
  • This handout image, released by Japanese Self Defense Ministry on March 19, shows a fire engine dousing reactor number 3 of Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station No.1 at Okuma town in Fukushima prefecture on March 18. Japanese crews fighting to cool overheating reactors laid a power line into a stricken nuclear power plant on March 19. – Japanese Self Defense Ministry / AFP - Getty Images
  • A woman collects water leaking from a manhole in Ishimaki, Japan, March 19. - Kyodo / Reuters
  • Shigemasa Kanno, 74, holds a photograph of his missing 68-year-old wife Sueko Kanno, at the debris of his destroyed house in Rikuzentakata, Japan, March 19. - Aly Song / Reuters
  • In this Thursday, March 18 photo, a farmer checks leeks cultivated in a vinyl house in the earthquake and tsunami-stricken town of Yamamoto, Japan. Japan said Saturday, March 19, that radiation levels in spinach and milk from farms near its tsunami-stricken Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power complex exceeded government safety limits. - photo AP
  • Heavy equipment is used to clear debris from streets in the devastated town of Kesennuma, Japan, March 19, eight days after an earthquake and the subsequent tsunami. - Kaname Muto / The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP
  • Evacuees stretch while doing exercises at an evacuation center in Rikuzentakata, northern Japan on March 19. Photo AP
  • Construction workers pray in silence Saturday before starting to build temporary housing for earthquake-affected residents of the coastal city of Rikuzentakata in Iwate prefecture. - Jiji Press / AFP - Getty Images
  • Residents shop for fresh vegetables Friday at an open-air market in Sendai in Miyagi prefecture, Japan. - Jiji Press / AFP - Getty Images
  • Fisherman Kazuyuki Honga sits inside blue plastic sheets set up on the third floor of his damaged house as he spends the night for the first time since the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, in Kamaishi, Iwate Prefecture, Japan, Sunday, March 20. Shohei Izumi / The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP
  • Tsunami damage is seen in Kessennuma, Miyagi prefecture on March 20. - Nicolas Asfouri / AFP - Getty Images
  • Tsunami survivor neighborhood watch volunteers make a bonfire at a makeshift evacuation center in Minami Sanriku, Miyagi prefecture, Japan, March 20. - Kimimasa Mayama / EPA
  • An elderly woman is wheeled into a room to be checked by medical staff at a shelter in a school for people whose homes were damaged by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami in Rikuzentakata, Iwate Prefecture, Japan, March 20. - Matt Dunham / AP
  • Members of Japan Self-Defense Force pray for the body of a tsunami victim wrapped in a tarp in Onagawa, Miyagi prefecture, Japan, March 20. - Shuji Kajiyama / AP
  • Two Japanese women, using golf clubs as walking sticks, scavenge for their belongings near a wrecked apartment block in the earthquake and tsunami destroyed town of Onagawa, Miyagi Prefecture, Japan, March 20. - David Guttenfelder / AP
  • TOKYO — An 80-year-old woman and her teenage grandson were rescued Sunday in northeastern Japan when the youth was able to pull himself out of their flattened two-story house nine days after the devastating earthquake and tsunami. - When asked if she was hurt, she said no. Jin Abe, 16, was seen calling out for help from the roof of the collapsed home in the hard-hit city of Ishinomaki, according to the Miyagi Prefectural Police. Like other homes in northeastern Japan, they had lost electricity and telephone service in the March 11 earthquake. He led them inside to his 80-year-old grandmother, Sumi Abe. Both were conscious but weak, and had survived on the food they had in their refrigerator, said Shizuo Kawamura of the Ishinomaki police department. The woman could not get out of the house because she has trouble walking, and the teenager, who was suffering from a low body temperature, had been unable until Sunday to pull himself from the wreckage, Kawamura told The Associated Press by telephone. They were found by local police who realized they couldn't get the woman out of the collapsed house and had to call other rescuers, he said.
  • Two Japanese soldiers stop to look at a ship which was blocking a road which their men were trying to clear in the earthquake and tsunami destroyed town of Onagawa, Miyagi Prefecture, northeastern Japan Sunday, March 20. - David Guttenfelder / AP
  • An elderly mother holds her daughter after being reunited again in Kesennuma city, Miyagi prefecture on March 20. The number of people confirmed dead or listed as missing in Japan surpassed 20,000, nine days after a massive earthquake and tsunami struck. AFP - Getty Images
  • Chiyoko Kaizuka, an 83-year old farmer, weeds a spinach field Sunday, March 20, in Moriya, Ibaragi Prefecture, Japan. Japan announced the first signs that contamination from its tsunami-crippled nuclear complex has seeped into the food chain, saying that radiation levels in spinach and milk from farms near the facility exceeded government safety limits. - Eugene Hoshiko / AP
  • A fish lies on top of a destroyed car in the earthquake and tsunami leveled town of Onagawa, Miyagi Prefecture, northeastern Japan Sunday, March 20.
  • A man looks for his missing son at a makeshift morgue in coastal city of Rikuzentakata, Iwate prefecture, northeastern Japan, March 20. - Dai Kurokawa / EPA
  • A woman feeds her cattle at a farm in Kawamata, Fukushima prefecture, 45 kms west of the Fukushima nuclear power plant, on March 20. Japan has detected abnormal levels of radiation in milk and spinach near the stricken nuclear plant, but the foods pose no immediate threat to humans. - Ken Shimizu / AFP - Getty Images
  • Construction workers build 200 temporary houses on March 20, in Rikuzentakata, Japan. Many people have begun to return to their homes as the search continues for thousands still missing. - hris Mcgrath / Getty Images
  • An electricity company employee, center, works on a pole in Ishinomaki on March 20 - Nicholas Kamm / AFP - Getty Images
  • Volunteers arrange food, water, medicine and blankets donated for evacuees from Futaba, a city near the quake-stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, at the evacuees' new shelter near Tokyo, March 20. - Jo Yong-hak / Reuters
  • Reuters Pictures A man who evacuated from Futaba, a city near the quake-stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, eats food as he rests in a hallway at the evacuees' new shelter Saitama Super Arena, near Tokyo March 20, 2011, nine days after an earthquake and tsunami hit Japan. About 2,300 people mainly from Futaba area arrived in Saitama, about 250 km (155 miles) away from their hometown, to evacuate after radiation leakage warnings.
  • Reuters Pictures A woman who evacuated from Futaba, a city near the quake-stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, rests in a hallway at the evacuees' new shelter Saitama Super Arena, near Tokyo March 20, 2011, nine days after an earthquake and tsunami hit Japan. About 2,300 people mainly from Futaba area arrived in Saitama, about 250 km (155 miles) away from their hometown, to evacuate after radiation leakage warnings.
  • Reuters Pictures - People who evacuated from Futaba, a city near the quake-stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, take a rest in a hallway at the evacuees' new shelter Saitama Super Arena, near Tokyo March 20, 2011, nine days after an earthquake and tsunami hit Japan. About 2,300 people mainly from Futaba area arrived in Saitama, about 250 km (155 miles) away from their hometown, to evacuate after radiation leakage warnings.
  • Reuters Pictures - Volunteers (L) receive necessaries including food, water, medicine and blankets donated from people to evacuees from Futaba, a city near the quake-stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, at the evacuees' new shelter Saitama Super Arena, near Tokyo March 20, 2011, nine days after an earthquake and tsunami hit Japan. About 2,300 people mainly from Futaba area arrived in Saitama, about 250 km (155 miles) away from their hometown, to evacuate after radiation leakage warnings. About 1,000 volunteers gathered on Sunday at the sports complex to help the nuclear evacuees..
  • Demotix Images Saitama Prefecture has accepted people evacuating from the town of Hutaba, located within a 20 km radius of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Many people also went there to volunteer and provide aid supplies. Saitama, Japan
  • Demotix Images About 12,000 people including the mayor arrive in Saitama, northern Tokyo after being evacuated from the town of Hutaba which is located within a 20km radius of Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
  • People line up with jugs in hopes of filling them with home heating fuel as massive shortages continue following fears of leaked radiation from the damaged Fukushima nuclear plant, March 20, in Fukushima city.- Wally Santana / AP
  • An employee of a petrol station operates a pedal-powered fuel pump in Minamisanriku, Miyagi prefecture on March 20. Jiji Press / AFP - Getty Images
  • Hisao Sato and his wife Yoshiko offer a prayer on March 20, prior to Higan, a Japanese Buddhist holiday to give prayer to the dead on the Spring Equinox, at their family grave stone behind their home in Ishimaki which was destroyed by tsunami waves. Asahi Shimbun / EPA
  • Notes of survivors looking for missing family members are posted on a board at the reporting center in the city of Kamaishi in Iwate prefecture on March 20 - Roslan Rahman / AFP - Getty Images
  • A survivor sits next to his sleeping wife at a shelter set up in a school of Kesennuma in Miyagi prefecture on March 20. (Nicolas AsfouriAFP/Getty Images)
  • Reuters Pictures - Smoke is seen coming from the area of the No. 3 reactor of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant in Tomioka, Fukushima Prefecture in northeastern Japan in this handout photo distributed by the Tokyo Electric Power Co. on March 21, 2011. Workers at the quake- and tsunami-hit plant were evacuated after smoke was seen rising from the reactor, among the most badly damaged at the six-reactor plant. Picture taken March 21, 2011.
  • Lance Cpl. Jonathan Blake uses specialized equipment to detect possible surface radiation on the sole of a shoe before an evacuation of Department of Defense dependents and Navy civilians on the island of Honshu on March 21. - U.S. Navy via Reuters
  • A makeshift shrine to honor victims of the earthquake and tsunami stands amid the ruins in Natori on March 21. - Gallo Images via Getty Images
  • Master-at-Arms 3rd Class Michael Cassano hugs his wife and child before an evacuation of Department of Defense dependents and Navy civilians on the island of Honshu on March 21. - U.S. Navy via Reuters
  • Akira Ab, father of 16-year-old Jin Abe, checks on his son at the Red Cross hospital in Ishinomaki on March 21. One day earlier, Jin and Akira's 80-year-old mother, Sumi Abe, were rescued from their collapsed home, nine days after the massive earthquake and tsunami. The story of survival provided some rare good news as the death toll from the March 11 earthquake and tsunami climbed. Jui Press via AFP - Getty Images
  • Workers repair railway tracks damaged by the March 11 earthquake in Hitachinaka, Ibaraki prefecture. - Yukie Nomura / AP
  • A vessel remains where the tsunami deposited it in Ishinomaki. - Kyodo News / AP
  • Fukushima Gov. Yuhei Sato offers words of hope at a shelter on March 21. Despite living close to the Fukushima nuclear facility, evacuees at the shelter say they had never had an emergency drill to prepare them for a nuclear disaster. - Wally Santana / AP
  • A man makes his way through Kesennuma, Miyagi prefecture, on March 21. Heavy rain along the northeast coast disrupted rescue efforts and compounded the misery of survivors now fearing radioactive fallout from the wrecked Fukushima plant. Fred Dufour / AFP - Getty Images
  • Earthquake and tsunami survivors hand off boxes of relief supplies arriving at their evacuation center in Ishinomaki on March 21 Kunihiko Miura / AP
  • A cemetery is littered with with cars deposited by the tsunami in Ishinomaki. - Mike Clarke / AFP - Getty Images
  • Chris McGrath / Getty Images A trophy and a squid are seen amongst the rubble on March 21, 2011 in Minamisanriku, Japan. The 9.0 magnitude earthquake struck offshore on March 11 at 2:46pm local time, triggering a tsunami wave which engulfed large parts of north-eastern Japan, and also damaging the Fukushima nuclear plant. The death toll continues to rise with numbers of dead and missing exceeding 20,000.
  • Workers construct temporary housing for the thousands of earthquake victims in Rikuzentakata on March 21. – Paula Bronstein / Getty Images
  • This handout picture, released from Tokyo Electric Power Co on March 22, shows workers spraying water to cool down the spent nuclear fuel in the fourth reactor building at TEPCO's Fukushima No.1 nuclear power plant at Okuma town in Fukushima prefecture. Tepco Via Jiji Press / AFP - Getty Images
  • A Japanese tsunami survivor stands in front of messages displayed on the wall of a relief center in Rikuzentakata, in Iwate prefecture on March 22. The twin quake and tsunami disaster, Japan's worst crisis since World War II, has now left at least 9,079 people dead and 12,645 missing, with entire communities along the northeast coast swept away. - Philippe Lopez / AFP - Getty Images
  • Survivors of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami watch Japan Ground Self Defense Force members bury victims of the disaster at a temporary mass grave in Higashi Matsushima, northern Japan, on March 22. Twenty four bodies were buried temporarily on Tuesday to be followed by others on later days because the city lacks the facilities to cremate the bodies. - Kyodo / Reuters
  • Schoolbags are recovered from Okawa elementary school in Ishinomaki, Miyagi prefecture on March 22. Only 24 of 84 schoolchildren and 13 teachers have been found alive so far. After the earthquake hit, all the schoolchildren and teachers prepared for evacuation in the school yard. Some children left for their homes with family members. While the rest of the children were waiting to be collected, the tsunami hit. Kimimasa Mayama / EPA
  • Higashi Matsushima city office employee Yoshio Suzuki walks along a temporary mass grave site where victims of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami are buried, March 22. Twenty-four bodies were buried temporarily on Tuesday and more are expected due to the lack of facilities to cremate bodies in the city. The site will be excavated to accommodate around 1,000 bodies in total. Yuriko Nakao / Reuters
  • Divers of the Japan Coast Guard search for missing people in waters off Onagawa, northern Japan, March 22. Kunihiko Miura / The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP
  • Norio Tsuzumi, vice president of Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Tepco), left, apologizes to evacuees at an evacuation center in Tamura, Fukushima prefecture, March 22. Public sentiment is such that Fukushima's governor Yuhei Sato rejected a meeting offered by the president of Tepco, the utility that runs the Fukushima nuclear plant. "Considering the anxiety, anger and exasperation being felt by people in Fukushima, there is just no way for me to accept their apology," said Gov. Sato on national broadcaster NHK. Koichi Nakamura / The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP
  • A truck drives by a tsunami warning sign, top left, in Kamaishi, Iwate prefecture, March 22. - Koji Sasahara / AP
  • A refugee receives attention at a relief centre in Minamisanriku town, Miyagi prefecture on Tuesday, March 22. Japan faces a mammoth disaster relief and reconstruction effort after its worst-ever earthquake triggered a tsunami that devastated the country's northeastern coast, killing thousands and spawning a severe nuclear crisis. - Carlos Barria / Reuters
  • People, whose homes were destroyed by a tsunami, take a bath in a tent set up by Japan's Self Defense Force in Kamaishi, March 22 - Damir Sagolj / Reuters
  • Rescue workers search for survivors on March 22 in Iwate prefecture. - Xinhua via Getty Images
  • A woman pushes her child amongst the debris on March 22 in Iwate prefecture. - Xinhua via Getty Images
  • First look inside crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant control room Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency via AP - In this photo released by Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, Tokyo Electric Power Co. workers collect data in the control room for Unit 1 and Unit 2 at the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okumamachi, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, on Wednesday, March 23.
  • In this photo released by Japan's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, Tokyo Electric Power Co. workers collect data in the control room for Unit 1 and Unit 2 at the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okumamachi on Wednesday, March 23. - AP photo
  • Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency via AP In this photo released by Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency, a Tokyo Electric Power Co. worker looks at gauges in the control room for Unit 1 and Unit 2 at the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okumamachi, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, Wednesday on March 23.
  • Reuters Pictures - A handout photo from Japan's Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency shows Tokyo Electric Power Co. workers refuelling a portable power generator at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Tomioka, Fukushima Prefecture northeastern Japan March 23, 2011. Picture taken March 23, 2011.
  • Dairy farmer Kenichi Hasegawa dumps milk in a corn field in Iitatemura, Fukushima prefecture. Radiation has seeped into vegetables, raw milk, the water supply and seawater since a magnitude-9 quake and killer tsunami crippled the Fukushima Dai-ichi power plant on March 11. - Takuya Yoshino / Yomiuri Shimbun via AP
  • A woman buys bottled water imported from France at a convenience store in central Tokyo. Japanese authorities advised against allowing infants to drink tap water in Tokyo due to raised radiation levels. - Lee Jae-Won / Reuters
  • Saya Takahashi, 12, sits in class during a graduation ceremony for the sixth grade at the Ohya Elementary school in Kesennuma. Paula Bronstein / Getty Images
  • High school baseball players offer silent prayers for victims of the earthquake and tsunami during the opening ceremony of the National High School Championship in Nishinomiya, western Japan. - Naoya Masuda / Yomiuri Shimbun via AP
  • Earthquake and tsunami-destroyed town held graduation ceremony for junior high Hiroto Nomoto / AP A graduation ceremony is held at gym turned shelter at a junior high school in the March 11 earthquake and tsunami-destroyed town of Otsuchi, northern Japan Tuesday, March 22, 2011.
  • Tetsuya Kikumasa / AP - Students react as a guest speaker delivers message at the graduation ceremony in the March 11 earthquake and tsunami-destroyed town of Yamada, northern Japan Tuesday, March 22, 2011.
  • Tetsuya Kikumasa / AP - Students react as they receive a certificate at the graduation ceremony in the March 11 earthquake and tsunami-destroyed town of Yamada, northern Japan Tuesday, March 22, 2011.
  • A student becomes emotional (right), and Shunichi Hatakeyama stands with students while holding a portrait of his son Fumiya, who has been missing since the March 11 tsunami struck, during a graduation ceremony for Hashikami elementary and junior high schools in a school turned evacuation center in Kesennuma, Miyagi prefecture on March 22. The ceremony, delayed a week, was for sixth- and ninth-grade classes and hundreds of now resident evacuees watched. (Shiho Fukada/International Herald Tribune)
  • Soldiers salute prior to placing a coffin into the tomb at a temporary cemetery in Higashimatsushima, Miyagi prefecture. A total of 60 tsunami victims were placed at the temporary cemetery over the last two days. Toshifumi Kitamura / AFP - Getty Images
  • local resident refuels his car at a gas station that was damaged by the earthquake and tsunami, in Motoyoshi town, Miyagi prefecture. Using a bicycle pump, the gas station, which is owned by a farmers cooperative, opened for regular customers on Wednesday, selling a maximum of 18 liters (4.75 gallons) per vehicle at the regular price. - Carlos Barria / Reuters
  • Japan Ground Self Defense Forces salute after laying a coffin during a burial ceremony for tsunami victims in Higashimatsushima, Miyagi prefecture. - Mark Baker / AP
  • A relative of an earthquake and tsunami victim cries as she looks into a coffin before burial at a temporary mass grave site in Higashimatsushima. Yuriko Nakao / Reuters
  • Food aisles are empty in an Iwate prefecture speciality shop in downtown Tokyo. - Everett Kennedy Brown / EPA
  • Fishermen clean up Kawajiri port, which was damaged by the earthquake and tsunami, in Hitachi, Ibaraki prefecture Toru Hanai / Reuters
  • Girls give massages to elderly women at a shelter in Yamada AP images
  • U.S. Navy crew members mop the flight deck of the USS Ronald Reagan in the Pacific to remove radioactive contamination. The aircraft carrier helped transport supplies to survivors in the earthquake and tsunami-devastated area. - Eugene Hoshiko / AP
  • Evacuees line up to receive curry with rice from volunteers from Hokkaido at a shelter in Yamada, Iwate Prefecture on Thursday, March 24. - Str / AFP - Getty Images
  • Divers from the Japanese Coast Guard search for missing persons in the port of Ayukawa in Ishinomaki, Miyagi Prefecture on Thursday. Kazuhiro Nogi / AFP - Getty Images
  • Paula Bronstein / Getty Images - Keiko Miura and her brother Masahiko Oyama grieve over the coffin of their mother Katsuko Oyama killed by the tsunami during a cremation March 24, 2011 in Minamisanriku , Japan. The family lost three family members from the earthquake and tsunami. Under Japanese Buddhist practice a cremation is the expected traditional way of dealing with the dead but now with the death toll so high crematoriums are overwhelmed and there is a shortage of fuel to burn them. Local municipalities are forced to dig mass graves as a temporary solution.
  • Police and family members carry the coffin, and family members transfer the bones of Masaichi Oyama, who was killed by the tsunami, by chopsticks into an urn the during a cremation ceremony in Kurihara on March 24. The family lost three family members from the earthquake and tsunami. Under Japanese Buddhist practice, a cremation is the traditional way of dealing with the dead, but now with the death toll so high, crematoriums are overwhelmed and there is a shortage of fuel to burn them. Local municipalities are forced to dig mass graves as a temporary solution. (Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
  • Police and family members carry the coffin, and family members transfer the bones of Masaichi Oyama, who was killed by the tsunami, by chopsticks into an urn the during a cremation ceremony in Kurihara on March 24. The family lost three family members from the earthquake and tsunami. Under Japanese Buddhist practice, a cremation is the traditional way of dealing with the dead, but now with the death toll so high, crematoriums are overwhelmed and there is a shortage of fuel to burn them. Local municipalities are forced to dig mass graves as a temporary solution. (Paula Bronstein /Getty Images)
  • Paula Bronstein / Getty Images A crematorium worker gets ready to close the door with the coffin of Katsuko Oyama, who was, killed by the tsunami into the oven during a cremation March 24, 2011 in Kurihara , Japan.
  • Family members and relatives transfer the bones of Masaichi Oyama, who was killed by the tsunami, by chopsticks into an urn the during a cremation ceremony on Thursday. The family lost three family members from the earthquake and tsunami. Under Japanese Buddhist practice, a cremation is the expected traditional way of dealing with the dead, but now with the death toll so high, crematoriums are overwhelmed and there is a shortage of fuel to burn them. Local municipalities are forced to dig mass graves as a temporary solution. - Paula Bronstein / Getty Images
  • Children hide under a table at a junior high school as a strong aftershock jolted the area at Ishinomaki, northeastern Japan, Thursday Miho Takahashi / AP
  • Workers remove debris from roads in Otsuchi, Iwate Prefecture on Thursday, March 24, after the recent earthquake and tsunami disaster - Toru Yamanaka / AFP - Getty Images
  • People collect bottles of mineral water at a food distribution in Yamada, Iwate Prefecture in northern Japan, on March 24. Tokyo residents were warned not to give babies tap water because of radiation leaking from a nuclear plant crippled in the earthquake and tsunami that devastated northeast Japan in the world's costliest natural disaster. - Carlos Barria / Reuters
  • Ducks swim past a submerged vehicle after the earthquake and tsunami in Yamada town on March 24. Carlos Barria / Reuters
  • Uchidate Noboyuki, 33, takes a smoking break as he digs through the remains of his house that was destroyed by the earthquake and tsunami in Yamada on March 24. Uchidate is still looking for his parents, sister and brother who were reported missing after the tsunami. - Carlos Barria / Reuters
  • Higashi Matsushima city office employee Yoshio Suzuki writes the name of a victim of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami on a piece of wood at a temporary mass grave site in Higashi-Matsushima, Miyagi prefecture, on March 24 - Yuriko Nakao / Reuters
  • U.S. Air Force 36th Airlift Squadron Master Sgt. Neal Martyniak walks by barrels containing diesel fuel aboard a C-130 transport plane on March 24, during a flight from Yokota Air Base in suburbs of Tokyo to Sendai Airport in Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture, Japan. In support of Operation Tomodachi, the U.S. Department of Defense is providing humanitarian assistance and disaster relief for the victims of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami. - Koji Ueda / AP
  • Women hang their laundry on makeshift lines in the seats of a gymnasium that has turned into an evacuation center in Yamagata, Yamagata Prefecture, northern Japan, on March 24. Hundreds of thousands remain homeless, squeezed into temporary shelters without heat, warm food or medicine and no idea what to call home after the March 11 tsunami swallowed up communities along the coast and dozens of strong aftershocks continued to shake the nation. - Mark Baker / AP
  • Man rescues porpoise from flooded rice field in Japan Asahi Shimbun / Reuters Ryo Taira lifts a porpoise out of a flooded rice field after it was swept by a tsunami following an earthquake in Sendai, in this picture taken by Asahi Shimbun on March 22, 2011. Taira found the porpoise struggling in the shallow seawater on Tuesday and after failing to net it, waded in to the field, which had yet to be sown with rice, to cradle the 1.2-metre (four foot) animal in his arms. Picture taken March 22, 2011.
  • Survivors gather to hear from city officials about a plan to move to a safer city from Minamisoma on March 24. (Satoshi Oga/The Yomiuri Shimbun/Associated Press
  • Reuters Pictures - Handout from Kyodo shows the central control room for the No. 1 reactor at Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant lit with electric lights in Tomioka, Fukushiima Prefecture, northeastern Japan on March 24, 2011. Engineers are trying to stabilise the six-reactor nuclear plant in Fukushima, 250 km (150 miles) north of the capital, nearly two weeks after an earthquake and tsunami battered the plant and devastated northeastern Japan, leaving nearly 26,000 people dead or missing. Mandatory Credit.
  • Reuters Pictures - Medical staff who will handle radiation exposed workers from Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant are pictured at Fukushima Medical University Hospital in Fukushima City, northeastern Japan, in this photo taken by Yomiuri Shimbun on March 24, 2011. Engineers are trying to stabilise the six-reactor nuclear plant in Fukushima, 250 km (150 miles) north of the capital, nearly two weeks after an earthquake and tsunami battered the plant and devastated northeastern Japan, leaving nearly 26,000 people dead or missing. Mandatory Credit.
  • Kyodo News via AP - Workers, who stepped into radiation-contaminated water during Thursday's operation at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear plant, are shielded with tarps before receiving decontamination treatment at a hospital in Fukushima, northeastern Japan on March 25. Later the men were transferred to a radiology medical institute for further treatment.
  • A baby is screened for leaked radiation at an evacuation center in Fukushima on March 24. (Kyodo News/Associated Press
  • Getty Images - HIGASHI MATSUSHIMA, JAPAN - MARCH 25: Families and relatives of the dead cry as they identify their family members at a temporary burial ground March 25, 2011 in Higashi Matsushima , Japan. Under Japanese Buddhist practice a cremation is the expected traditional way of dealing with the dead but now with the death toll so high crematoriums are overwhelmed and there is a shortage of fuel to burn them. Local municipalities are forced to dig mass graves as a temporary solution. Two weeks after the magnitude 9 earthquake and tsunami struck Japan the death toll has risen to 10,000 dead with still thousands missing and the expectation is that it will end up well over 20,000. Presently the country is still struggling to repair a damaged nuclear power plant that has caused tremendous problems, evacuations, and now tainted water supply in the Tokyo area causing more panic buying of bottled water.
  • Getty Images - Flowers are tied to a stone momument on a bridge in the quake and tsunami-devastated Yuriage district of Natori, Miyagi prefecture, on March 25, 2011. Two weeks after a giant quake struck and sent a massive tsunami crashing into the Pacific coast, the death toll from Japan's worst post-war disaster topped 10,000 and there was scant hope for 17,500 others still missing. At least 600 of the dead hail from the Yuriage district of Natori.
  • Getty Images - A local couple who lost their parents in the tsunami gaze out to memorize the view amid the destruction form the March 11 twin disasters near to their home in the Yuriage district of Natori, Miyagi prefecture, on March 25, 2011. Two weeks after a giant quake struck and sent a massive tsunami crashing into the Pacific coast, the death toll from Japan's worst post-war disaster topped 10,000 and there was scant hope for 17,500 others still missing. At least 600 of the dead hail from the Yuriage district of Natori.
  • Getty Images - HIGASHI MATSUSHIMA, JAPAN - MARCH 25: Families and relatives of the dead cry as they identify their family members at a temporary burial ground March 25, 2011 in Higashi Matsushima , Japan. Under Japanese Buddhist practice a cremation is the expected traditional way of dealing with the dead but now with the death toll so high crematoriums are overwhelmed and there is a shortage of fuel to burn them. Local municipalities are forced to dig mass graves as a temporary solution. Two weeks after the magnitude 9 earthquake and tsunami struck Japan the death toll has risen to 10,000 dead with still thousands missing and the expectation is that it will end up well over 20,000. Presently the country is still struggling to repair a damaged nuclear power plant that has caused tremendous problems, evacuations, and now tainted water supply in the Tokyo area causing more panic buying of bottled water.
  • Getty Images HIGASHI MATSUSHIMA, JAPAN - MARCH 25: Families and relatives of the dead cry as they identify their family members at a temporary burial ground March 25, 2011 in Higashi Matsushima , Japan.
  • Getty Images - People in a quake and tsunami-devastated area buy vegetables on the street in Kesennuma, Miyagi prefecture, on March 25, 2011, two weeks after a giant 9.0-magnitude quake struck and sent a massive tsunami crashing into the Pacific coast of Japan. The tsunami obliterated entire towns. Some 250,000 homeless in almost 2,000 shelters are braving privations and a winter chill, with a degree of discipline and dignity that has impressed the world.
  • Getty Images Salvaged memorial pictures and goods are displayed at a corner of the town hall in Yamada town, Iwate prefecture on March 25, 2011. The grim toll of dead and missing from Japan's monster quake and tsunami on March 11 topped 26,000, as hundreds of thousands remained huddled in evacuation shelters and fears grew in Tokyo over water safety. Share this page
  • Getty Images - A picture shows humanitarian aid from French laboratory Pierre Fabre next to a cargo plane being loaded with medecines, food, blankets, radioactivity mesuring instruments and others supplies, on the tarmac of the Marcel Dassault airport on March 21, 2011, in Deols near Chateauroux, central France, before its departure for Japan. France prepares to send aid to Japan following the earthquake, tsunami and the nuclear crisis which hit the country.
  • Getty Images - Evacuees rest in a shelter in Kamaishi, Iwate prefecture on March 25, 2011. Two weeks after a giant 9.0-magnitude quake struck and sent a massive tsunami crashing into the Pacific coast, wiping entire towns off the map, Japan held out little hope of finding alive another 17,500 listed as missing.
  • Getty Images - Local residents cook steamed rice at Onagawa town in Miyagi prefecture on March 25, 2011. The death toll from Japan's worst post-war disaster topped 10,000 as the operator of a radiation-belching nuclear plant warned that work to stabilise it may take another month.
  • Getty Images - Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan delivers a message to the Japanese people at his official residence in Tokyo on March 25, 2011. Japan's Prime Minister Naoto Kan called on those hit by the devastating March 11 earthquake and tsunami to summon the courage to move forward and overcome Japan's worst post-war crisis. He aslo said that the situation at the disaster-hit Fukushima nuclear power plant was still 'very unpredictable' and thanked those 'risking their lives' to handle the disaster.
  • AP Photo - An elderly woman and her husband sit in an evacuee center for leaked radiation from the damaged Fukushima nuclear facilities, Friday, March 25, 2011 in Soma, Fukushima prefecture, Japan. Experts are worried that anxiety caused by the fear of radiation may cause serious health problems for residents in the months and years ahead.
  • Reuters Pictures - A man warms himself next to a stove as tsunami victims take shelter in a Buddhist temple in Kesennuma, two weeks after the area was devastated by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami, March 25, 2011. The March 11 quake and tsunami have left at least 27,000 dead and missing in northeast Japan.
  • Reuters Pictures - Tsunami victims find shelter in a Buddhist temple in Kesennuma, two weeks after the area was devastated by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami, March 25, 2011. The March 11 quake and tsunami have left at least 27,000 dead and missing in northeast Japan.
  • AP Photo - A woman passes the day away with her newborn at an evacuee center for leaked radiation from the damaged Fukushima nuclear facilities, Friday, March 25, 2011 in Soma, Fukushima prefecture, Japan. Experts are worried that anxiety caused by the fear of radiation may cause serious health problems for residents in the months and years ahead.
  • Getty Images - French Ambassador to Japan Philippe Faure (C) speaks to members of a French rescue team as a total of 150 tons of relief supplies, water, food and blankets is unloaded from the world's largest cargo plane, an Antonov 225, at Narita airport in Chiba prefecture, outside Tokyo, on March 25, 2011. The French team will bring the aid to Sendai in Miyagi prefecture, north of Tokyo, to deliver to earthquake and tsunami victims at shelters.
  • Reuters Pictures - Yoshiko Sugawara, a 70-year-old tsunami survivor, cries as her niece leaves on a boat named "Sunflower" from the island of Oshima for the mainland March 25, 2011. Through burnt ships and debris, a boat called Sunflower sails to bring food, clothing and families to isolated victims of a devastating earthquake and tsunami on Japan's Oshima Island off the northeaster Sanriku coast. For the survivors, the boat is the only connection between their island with a population of 3,200 and the city of Kesennuma on Japan's main island, which is usually 25 minutes away by ferry. The March 11 quake and tsunami have left at least 27,000 dead and missing in northeast Japan.
  • Reuters Pictures - Fishermen take a break from cleaning the port devastated by a tsunami two weeks ago at the island of Oshima March 25, 2011. Through burnt ships and debris, a boat called Sunflower sails to bring food, clothing and families to isolated victims of a devastating earthquake and tsunami on Japan's Oshima Island off the northeaster Sanriku coast. For the survivors, the boat is the only connection between their island with a population of 3,200 and the city of Kesennuma on Japan's main island, which is usually 25 minutes away by ferry. The March 11 quake and tsunami have left at least 27,000 dead and missing in northeast Japan.
  • Getty Images - A girl and her mother try secondhand clothes, donated for relief supplies at a shelter at Onagawa town in Miyagi prefecture on March 25, 2011. The death toll from Japan's worst post-war disaster topped 10,000 as the operator of a radiation-belching nuclear plant warned that work to stabilise it may take another month.
  • Getty Images - A worker is interviewed by Japanese journalists beside containers of imported apples from the Japanese city of Aomori, at the customs and quarantine section of the Xinfandi wholesale market for agricultural products, one of the largest on its kind in Beijing on March 25, 2011. China banned imports of several food products from Japan on amid fears of contamination from its crippled nuclear plant and reported finding elevated radiation levels on two Japanese travellers.
  • Reuters Pictures - Police who have finished checking Minamisoma City for radiation are screened for radiation contamination in Kawamata, Fukushima Prefecture in northeastern Japan, in this photo by Kyodo on March 25, 2011. Japan said on Friday workers who suffered burns while trying to cool a crippled reactor were exposed to radiation levels 10,000 times higher than expected, adding evidence that the crucial containment vessel for nuclear fuel had been ruptured. Mandatory Credit.
  • Reuters Pictures A U.S. marine based in Japan checks piles of bottled water unloaded from a U.S. military flight at Sendai airport, which was hit by the earthquake and tsunami in Sendai, Miyagi Prefecture, March 25, 2011. U.S. forces will provide water to help cool the reactors at Japan's stricken nuclear plant north of Tokyo, Kyodo news agency quoted Japanese Defence Minister Toshimi Kitazawa as saying on Friday.
  • AP Photo A sign in Japanese that reads, "Eliminate Nuclear Power," is posted near the Onagawa Nuclear Power Plant in Onagawa, Iwate prefecture, northeastern Japan, on Friday, March 25, 2011, after the March 11 earthquake and tsunami devastated the area. The Tohoku Electric Power Co.'s Onagawa Nuclear Power Plant, also located on Japan's northeastern coast, wasn't affected by the quake and tsunami.
  • Reuters Pictures - A science research specialist tests rice samples from Japan to determine the level of radiation using a High Purity Germanium Detector at the Philippine Nuclear Research Institute (PNRI) headquarters in Quezon city, metro Manila March 25, 2011. The Philippines has been testing samples of food items from Japan to establish a baseline radiation level after the earthquake and tsunami disaster that hit Japan in the last two weeks.
  • Reuters Pictures - A U.S. marine based in Japan directs heavy lifting equipment March 25, 2011 as reconstruction work continues at Sendai airport that was hit by an earthquake and tsunami, northern Japan. U.S. forces will provide water to help cool the reactors at Japan's stricken nuclear plant north of Tokyo, Kyodo news agency quoted Japanese Defence Minister Toshimi Kitazawa as saying on Friday.
  • Reuters Pictures - Japan Self Defense Force members in protective clothing prepare to transfer to another hospital workers who were exposed to radiation at Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, at the Fukushima Medical University Hospital in Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan March 25, 2011. About 300 engineers have been working around the clock to stabilise the six-reactor Fukushima complex since an earthquake and tsunami struck two weeks ago. Mandatory credit.
  • Reuters Pictures - Japan's nuclear safety agency official Hidehiko Nishiyama (R) consults a staff member during a news conference on Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant, in Tokyo March 25, 2011. Mandatory credit.
  • Reuters Pictures - Hayato Nishi, 6, from Minamisoma in Fukushima Prefecture, undergoes a screening test for signs of nuclear radiation by a doctor at a health center in Yonezawa, northern Japan, 98 km (61 miles) from the Fukushima nuclear plant, March 25, 2011. Hayato's 31-year-old father Hiroyuki Nishi told Reuters on Friday that he worked at the No. 3 reactor of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant when a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami hit the area. Tokyo residents were warned not to give babies tap water because of radiation leaking from a nuclear plant crippled in an earthquake and tsunami that devastated northeast Japan.
  • Reuters Pictures A cook operates a radiation detector over shellfish from Kyushu, Japan, as a Japanese restaurant tries to maintain confidence in the consumption of Japanese food, in Hong Kong March 22, 2011. China and South Korea have announced they will toughen checks of Japanese food for radioactivity, hours after the World Health Organisation said the detection of radiation in some food in Japan was a more serious problem than it had expected. Reactors at the Fukushima Daiichi plant, 240 km (150 miles) north of Tokyo, have leaked radiation after they were struck on March 11 by a massive earthquake and tsunami that led to the world's worst nuclear crisis since Chernobyl 25 years ago.
  • New footage shows immediate aftermath of tsunami striking Fukushima nuclear plant Reuters - Further waves approach the Fukushima nuclear power plant immediately after a tsunami struck, about 40 minutes following a magnitude 9 earthquake in Tomioka, Fukushima prefecture, Japan in this still image taken from a March 11, 2011 video released by the Ministry of Transport Tohuku Regional Bureau via Reuters TV.
  • Reuters Waves accompanying a tsunami approach the coastline and the Fukushima nuclear power plant in this still image taken from a March 11, 2011 video released by the Ministry of Transport Tohuku Regional Bureau via Reuters TV.
  • Reuters An aerial view shows the immediate aftermath at the Fukushima nuclear power plant after it was hit by a tsunami, in this still image taken from a March 11, 2011 video released by the Ministry of Transport Tohuku Regional Bureau via Reuters TV.
  • A presentation by Nubia [email_address] http://nubiagroup-powerpoint-collection.blogspot.com/ http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Nubia_group_Powerpoint_Collection/