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JAPAN one Month later - 2011 april 12
 

JAPAN one Month later - 2011 april 12

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find the link to download this presentation on my blog : http://nubiagroup-powerpoint-collection.blogspot.com/

find the link to download this presentation on my blog : http://nubiagroup-powerpoint-collection.blogspot.com/

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  • Yes this really so sad and despressing - i admire their attitude and courage
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  • Merci pour le partage chère Nubia...on ne peut rester indifférent...Bises. Bernard
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    JAPAN one Month later - 2011 april 12 JAPAN one Month later - 2011 april 12 Presentation Transcript

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    • JAPAN – 2011 april 12 Japanese authorities have raised the severity rating of the nuclear crisis at the damaged Fukushima Daiichi power plant to the highest level, seven. The decision reflects the ongoing release of radiation, rather than a sudden deterioration. Level seven previously only applied to the 1986 Chernobyl disaster, where 10 times as much radiation was emitted. Japan residents on raised nuclear threat level The Japanese people are trying not to show their nervousness despite the warning about the nuclear threat level and several aftershocks on the same day. Physically they are used to the jolts, but mentally they are stressed-out. Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan invoked his country's recovery from World War II on Tuesday as he sought to turn the nation's attention to the arduous task of rebuilding. Yet the challenges awaiting Japan remained on full display the day he spoke: The country rated the crisis at a nuclear plant stricken after last month's earthquake and tsunami as the most severe on an international system for rating nuclear accidents. And a fresh round of earthquakes rumbled across an already battered landscape. One with a magnitude of 6.3 was the latest of 52 quakes with a magnitude of 6 or greater since a monster 9.0 quake rocked the country and spawned a tsunami, leaving nearly 28,0000 people dead or missing. 10 THINGS TO EMULATE FROM JAPAN 1. THE CALM Not a single visual of chest-beating or wild grief. Sorrow itself has been elevated.   2.THE DIGNITY Disciplined queues for water and groceries. Not a rough word or a crude gesture.   3. THE ABILITY The incredible architects, for instance. Buildings swayed but didn ’ t fall.   4. THE GRACE People bought only what they needed for the present, so everybody could get something.   5. THE ORDER No looting in shops. No honking and no overtaking on the roads. Just understanding.   6. THE SACRIFICE Fifty workers stayed back to pump sea water in the N-reactors. How will they ever be repaid?   7. THE TENDERNESS Restaurants cut prices. An unguarded ATM is left alone. The strong cared for the weak.   8. THE TRAINING The old and the children, everyone knew exactly what to do. And they did just that.   9. THE MEDIA They showed magnificent restraint in the bulletins. No silly reporters. Only calm reportage.   10.THE CONSCIENCE When the power went off in a store, people put things back on the shelves and left quietly.
    • The gods may have punished us,' Japanese woman worries  Fukuko Hatakeyama, whose house was washed away in the tsunami, talks about her loss as she stands in debris in Miyagi prefecture on March 29. Kuni Takahashi
    • Fukushima Prefectural officers collect soil samples to check for radiation contamination at a rice paddy in Kunimimachi, northern Japan Thursday, March 31. Tsuyoshi Yoshioka / AP
    • Japanese tsunami victims wait in line for food, rice and toilet paper distributed by Japanese Self Defense Forces in Yamada city, Iwate prefecture, March 31. - Asahi Shimbun via EPA
    • Workers set up a solar power system for a temporary office building in the town of Minamisanriku, Miyagi Prefecture, March 31. Daisuke Uragami / AP
    • Elementary school children look for their belongings after school supplies were found near their school in Ishinomaki on March 31. Jiji Press via AFP - Getty Images
    • Newly recruited employees of Japanese auto giant Toyota Motor bow their heads in prayer for the victims of the tsunami and earthquake during the company's entrance ceremony at Toyota's headquarters in Toyota city in Aichi prefecture on April 1. Toyota resumed production of its Prius and some Lexus hybrid models because it now expects to be able to procure parts and wants to prioritize models with higher demand. - Jiji Press via AFP - Getty Images
    • Young evacuees play cards at a shelter in Ofunato on April 1. - Eugene Hoshiko / AP
    • Survivors wait for relief funds at the city hall in the tsunami-destroyed town of Sendai on April 1. The sign reads "This counter accepts monetary donations. Thank you for your warm cooperation." - Vincent Yu / AP
    • Japan Maritime Self-Defense Force personnel prepare to search for victims near the town of Ofunato on April 1. - Lee Jin-man / AP
    • U.S. Marines pray for the victims before starting to clear the rubble at the city of Kesennumaoshima on April 1. - Haruka Takahashi / Yomiuri Shimbun via AP
    • Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan wipes his face during a press conference at his official residence in Tokyo on April 1. Kan said that an extra budget would be drafted to deal with the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami. Franck Robichon / EPA
    • Evacuees rest in "rooms" partitioned by cardboard walls at an evacuation center in the coastal town of Onagawa, Japan, on Friday, April 1. Onagawa is one of the hardest-hit areas in the region but the locals say they have been receiving very little help from the government. - Dai Kurokawa / EPA
    • Members of the Japan Coast Guard rescue a dog after it was found drifting on the roof of a house floating off Kesennuma, northeastern Japan, Friday, April 1. The dog wears a collar, but there is no address on it. - AP
    • Japan's Self-Defense Force's members continue a search operation near an elementary school where lots of the students have been missing since March 11 earthquake and tsunami, in Ishinomaki, northern Japan Saturday, April 2. -AP
    • In this handout picture released by the Japanese Prime Minister's Official Residence and taken on April 2, Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan, center, points into the devastated area of the tsunami-ravaged town of Rikuzentakata, Iwate Prefecture in his first visit to the tsunami-hit region since the disaster over three weeks ago. - Japanese Prime Minister's Office via AFP - Getty Images
    • Port facilities sit damaged in Shinchi, Fukushima prefecture, northern Japan, April 2. Kyodo News via AP
    • A boy, carried by his mother, extends his hand to touch cherry blossoms at Tokyo's Ueno Park on April 2. Cherry blossoms, symbols of the fleeting nature of life, are blooming in Tokyo but many of the usual boisterous parties will be cancelled as Japan tries to recover from the tsunami and nuclear disasters. Yoshikazu Tsuno / AFP - Getty Images
    • An elderly woman waves to her grandchildren before departing during a mass evacuation in Minamisanriku, Miyagi prefecture, on April 3. The port town where more than half the population are now homeless started evacuating 1,100 people to shelters elsewhere . Jiji Press via AFP - Getty Images
    • A couple visit the site where coffins of victims of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami were buried in Higashimatsushima, Miyagi Prefecture, April 3. - Naoki Maeda / Yomiuri Shimbun via AP
    • A dog is screened for radiation contamination after being reunited with its owner in Tamura, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan, April 4. Tamura city lies partly within the zone around the tsunami-crippled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, where officials have told residents to stay indoors. Kenji Shimizu / Yomiuri Shimbun via AP
    • Residents who lost their homes in the massive March 11 earthquake and tsunami line up to fill out insurance forms in the town of Minamisanriku, Miyagi prefecture, on April 5. The tsunami-hit Japanese port town where more than half the population are now homeless started a mass evacuation of some 1,100 people to shelters elsewhere. - kazuhiro Nogi / AFP - Getty Images
    • Women sort fish at the Hirakata Fish Market in Kitaibaraki, Ibaraki Prefecture on April 5 for the first time since the March 11 earthquake and tsunami disaster. The health ministry said that iodine-131 at a level of 4,080 becquerels per kilogram had been detected in a small fish called konago, or sand lance, caught off Ibaraki prefecture, south of the plant. – Toru Yamanaka / AFP - Getty Images
    • Children play soccer in the tsunami-devastated coastal town of Otsuchi, Iwate Prefecture, northeastern Japan on April 5. Dennis M. Sabangan / EPA
    • Miyoko Tazaki, 79, searches with her children for their missing relatives in the tsunami-devastated coastal town of Otsuchi, Iwate Prefecture, northeastern Japan on April 5.. The devastating earthquake and ensuing tsunami have left over 11,800 people dead and 15,540 others unaccounted for in Japan, the National Police Agency. - Dennis M. Sabangan / EPA
    • Scuba divers search for the bodies of missing people in water of Yoriiso fishing port in Ishinomaki, Miyagi Prefecture on April 5. Naoki Maeda / AP
    • An evacuee from March 11 earthquake and tsunami sleeps at a gymnasium, currently serving as an evacuation center, inside Ajinomoto stadium before a visit by Japan's Crown Prince Naruhito and Crown Princess Masako in Chofu, western Tokyo Wednesday, April 6. Yuriko Nakao / AP
    • Japan's Crown Prince Naruhito and Crown Princess Masako talk to evacuees from the March 11 earthquake and tsunami at a gymnasium, currently serving as an evacuation center, inside Ajinomoto stadium in Chofu, western Tokyo on April 6. The royal couple visited the evacuation centre to show solidarity with evacuees almost a month after the devastating earthquake and tsunami ravaged the east coast of Japan claiming the lives of over 10,000 people. - Yuriko Nakao / AFP - Getty Images
    • A Japanese soldier distributes clothing during relief operations in the tsunami-devastated coastal town of Otsuchi, Iwate Prefecture, northeastern Japan on April 6. Dennis M. Sabangan / EPA
    • Tsunami survivor Miyoko Kimura, 84, touches the carved name of her late husband on the stone shrine of the family guardian deity that he dedicated as she visits her home town on April 6 for the first time since the March 11 earthquake and tsunami in Onagawa, Miyagi prefecture. yasuyoshi Chiba / AFP - Getty Images
    • Members of a Mexican relief team gather as they launch their search operation in the tsunami-ravaged city of Natori in Miyagi Prefecture on Wednesday, April 6. Kyodo News via AP
    • A girl walks with her mother after her first day of school at the Shimizu elementary school in Fukushima, northern Japan on April 6. Carlos Barria / Reuters
    • Children sit inside a classroom on their first day of school at Shimizu elementary school in Fukushima, northern Japan April 6. Over 70 schools began their regular classes on Wednesday in the city of Fukushima, after the earthquake and tsunami that hit the country on March 11. Carlos Barria / Reuters
    • Carlos Barria / Reuters - Children attend a ceremony on their first day of school at Shimizu elementary school in Fukushima, northern Japan on April 6. Over 70 schools began their regular classes on Wednesday in the city of Fukushima, after the earthquake and tsunami that hit the country on March 11.
    • A boy who survived the tsunami plays in a toy car in front of a real car still balancing on its front end in Ishinomaki, Miyagi prefecture, on April 6. With the toll topping 10,000 confirmed dead the March 11 quake has become Japan's deadliest natural disaster since the 1923 Great Kanto Earthquake, which killed more than 142,000 people. Hundreds of thousands of people have been displaced from their homes and have taken shelter in emergency facilities. Yasuyoshi Chiba / AFP - Getty Images
    • Buddhist monk Sokan Obara, 28, from Morioka, Iwate prefecture, prays for the victims in an area devastated by the earthquake and tsunami, in Ofunato, Iwate prefecture, April 7. Lee Jin-man / AP
    • Sokan Obara, a Buddhist monk, prays for the victims in the debris in Ofunato, Iwate prefecture, on April 7. (Lee Jin-man/Associated Press
    • Workers climb poles to fix power lines in Minamisanriku, Miyagi prefecture, April 6. Toru Hanai / Reuters
    • Students carry chairs on April 7 from the Hirota Elementary School which was damaged by the earthquake and tsunami in Rikuzentakata, Iwate prefecture. Tsuyoshi Matsumoto / The Yomiuri Shimbun via AP
    • Cats rescued from the March 11 earthquake and tsunami look out from their cages at Abe Pet Clinic in Ishinomaki, on April 7. The pet clinic became the main headquarters for treating and sheltering animals in Ishinomaki since the disaster struck the country last month. Carlos Barria / Reuters
    • A man surveys two dead horses within the exclusion zone around the Fukushima nuclear plant on April 7 in Minami Soma. Athit Perawongmetha / Getty Images
    • Dogs wander around the town of Minami Soma, April 7 - . Hiro Komae / AP
    • Japanese police, wearing suits to protect them from radiation, search for victims in Minami Soma, within the deserted evacuation zone around the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactors, on April 7 in Fukushima prefecture. - David Guttenfelder / AP
    • A man rides a motorcycle through water in Ishinomaki city, Miyagi prefecture, April 8. Jiji Press / AFP - Getty Images
    • This aerial photo shows oil leaking from the Onagawa nuclear power station in Miyagi prefecture, northern Japan, on Friday, April 8, following a strong aftershock on Thursday. Dennis M. Sabangan / EPA
    • Japan's Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko wave as they arrive at an evacuation center in Kazo, Saitama prefecture, on April 8. The imperial couple visited the shelter to encourage some 1,400 evacuees, mostly from Fukushima prefecture where the troubled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant is located. Tsuyoshi Yoshioka / Yomiuri Shimbun via AP
    • Kunio Shiga listens to a battery-powered radio in the living room of his home in Minami Soma, Fukushima prefecture, inside the deserted evacuation zone around the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear complex on April 8. The 75-year-old man was stranded alone in his farmhouse ever since Japan's monstrous tsunami struck nearly a month ago. - Hiro Komae / AP AP reports: The farmhouse sits about 500 yards down a mud-caked one-lane road strewn with felled trees, the carcasses of pigs and debris from the March 11 tsunami. Sitting alone inside the cold, darkened home is 75-year-old Kunio Shiga. He cannot walk very far, his wife is missing and he is scared and disoriented. "You are the first people I have spoken to" since the tsunami, he tells the AP.
    • Japanese police officers wearing white suits to protect them from radiation stand by a victim in a tarp as others carry another body in Minami Soma, Fukushima prefecture, April 8. Hundreds of Japanese police and soldiers have begun a major search operation inside the deserted evacuation zone around the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactors. - Hiro Komae / AP
    • People line up for food and life supplies in front of a supermarket in Oshu, Iwate prefecture, April 8. A major aftershock rocked northeast Japan on Thursday and stores that had been newly restocked began rationing purchases again Toru Hanai / Reuters
    • A cashier uses a calculator by candlelight on Friday, April 8 at a supermarket during a blackout that began after Thursday night's strong aftershock. The 7.1 aftershock hit northeastern Japan, killing three people and knocking out power to vast areas. Hiroshi Adachi / Yomiuri Shimbun via AP
    • Japan Self-Defense Force members pay their respect to earthquake victims in vehicles during a mass funeral on April 8 in Yamamoto, Miyagi prefecture. - Athit Perawongmetha / Getty Images
    • The mayor of Yamamoto places flowers on the coffin of an unidentified earthquake victim during a mass funeral on April 8 in Yamamoto, Miyagi prefecture. The death toll continues to rise with numbers of dead and missing believed to exceed 25,000. Athit Perawongmetha / Getty Image
    • Buddhist monks pray in a tsunami-razed area of Natori, Miyagi.
    • Just a few buildings are left standing amid blocks of devastation in the town of Ishinomaki, Miyagi prefecture. (Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images)
    • Getty Images A protester holds a placard at an anti-nuclear power rally at the Tokyo Electric Popwer Company (TEPCO) headquarters in Tokyo on April 8, 2011. A powerful aftershock rocked Japan's tsunami disaster zone, killing at least four and triggering new concerns over nuclear power plants in a region still grappling with an atomic emergency. The crippled Fukushima number 1 nuclear plant has leaked radiation which has made its way into tap water and farm produce, sparking food export bans covering a large area.
    • Getty Images A protester wearing a Bart Simpson mask holds a placard that reads 'Change energy policy' at an anti-nuclear power rally at the Tokyo Electric Popwer Company (TEPCO) headquarters in Tokyo on April 8, 2011
    • Erik S. Lesser / AFP - Getty Images A Putzmeister concrete pumper is loaded onto a Russian Antonov AN-124 cargo airplane at Hartsfield Jackson Atlanta International Airport on April 8, in Atlanta, Georgia.
    • Erik S. Lesser / AFP - Getty Images The 95-ton pumper will be delivered to Japan to assist in the cooling down efforts of the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Two of the world's largest concrete pumps were loaded onto Russian cargo jets at American airports headed for Japan.  The Putzmeister America pumps have been retrofitted to to pour water on a Japanese nuclear power plant stricken by an earthquake and tsunami.  AP says: The 190,000-pound pump designed by Wisconsin-based Putzmeister America Inc. comes mounted on a 26-wheel truck. Its extendable boom can reach more than 200 feet, and can be operated two miles away by remote control, making it possible to shoot water into hard-to-reach places at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Japan. If necessary, the pump could also entomb a damaged nuclear reactor in concrete. After a 1986 disaster, Putzmeister sent 11 pumps to pour concrete over parts of the Chernobyl nuclear plant in Ukraine. Moving such a large pump required hiring a Russian Antonov AN-124 cargo jet, one of the world's largest. After landing in Atlanta, the towering plane taxied to a stop near the truck. The plane's nose lifted, revealing a ramp that extended as if the aircraft had stuck out a green, metal tongue. Once the ramp was fully constructed, a driver steered the pump truck into the plane. That pump and another picked up at Los Angeles International Airport are scheduled to depart Saturday. Putzmeister America's parent company in Germany has already sent a smaller pump and plans to send another. The Japanese utility is picking up the cost of shipping the pumps to the region.
    • Lee Jin-man / AP Hotel guests check their mobile phones for earthquake news after they evacuated the building following an aftershock, in Ichinoseki, Iwate Prefecture, Japan, on Friday, April 8. Japan was rattled by a strong aftershock and tsunami warning Thursday night nearly a month after a devastating earthquake and tsunami flattened the northeastern coast.
    • Reuters Pictures Greenpeace radiation expert Rianne Teule checks contamination levels outside Koriyama on one of the major highways connecting Tokyo with the north of Japan April 8, 2011. Koriyama is located just outside of the 20 km (12 mile) evacuation zone of crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant whose six reactors were hit by a giant tsunami one month ago.
    • Reuters Pictures Japan's Empress Michiko (R) talks with an evacuee at an evacuation center in Kazo, Saitama Prefecture, April 8, 2011. Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko visited the shelter to encourage some 1,400 evacuees from the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, mostly from Fukushima Prefecture where the troubled Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant is located.
    • Reuters Pictures Disaster relief leaders hold a meeting at the Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Fukushima Prefecture, in this handout photo taken on April 1 and released by Tokyo Electric Power April 8, 2011. Picture taken April 1, 2011.
    • The compound of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant is seen the moment before a tsunami hit (top) following the March 11 earthquake, and after (bottom), as water rushes into the compound . The pictures were released by Tokyo Electric Power Co. on April 10. Tokyo Electric Power Co. / Reuters
    • Anti-nuclear protesters march in the streets, April 10, in Tokyo. Tayama Tatsuyuki / Getty Images
    • Meanwhile, Japan said it would widen the evacuation zone around the crippled power station over the coming month because of radiation concerns. Here senior officials of the plant's operator, Tokyo Electric Power Co, bow in front of media after talks with a government minister.
    • Japan's Prime Minister Naoto Kan, left, shouts "Come on, Japan" along with Ishinomaki Mayor Hiroshi Kameyama, center, and others as he visits Ishinomaki, a port town devastated by last month's earthquake and tsunami in northeastern Japan, on April 10. Kyodo News via AP
    • A person enters a shower booth at a makeshift shower facility set up by the US Army adjacent to an evacuation center in the tsunami-devastated coastal city of Higashimatsushima, Miyagi prefecture, northeastern Japan, April 10. Some tsunami-hit cities and towns in the region once again have lost the electricity and running water after a 7.1-magnitude aftershock on April 7. More than 150,000 survivors are still living in evacuation centers scattered around the region. Dai Kurokawa / EPA
    • Tsunami survivor Tadao Kamei, left, and a friend draw the words "ganbaro!" or "hang in there" on a new billboard lit up with car headlights in Ishinomaki, Miyagi prefecture on April 10. Prime Minister Naoto Kan promised he would "never abandon" survivors of Japan's tsunami as he tried to focus attention on the future, despite a high-stakes battle at a nuclear plant. Yasuyoshi Chiba / AFP - Getty Images
    • Japanese residents pray for victims at an elementary school in Ishinomaki, northeastern Japan, on Monday, April 11. Exactly one month ago, a massive earthquake and tsunami ravaged Japan's northeastern coastal region. - Kyodo News via AP
    • Volunteers remove mud and sort family photographs recovered by defense force soldiers from tsunami devastated areas, at a shelter in Kesennuma city in Miyagi prefecture on April 10. Jiji Press via AFP - Getty Images
    • Two-year-old Ayaka and family members pray for her missing grandmother and great grandmother at a vacant lot where they lived in Ishinomaki, Miyagi prefecture, on April 11. - yasuyoshi Chiba / AFP - Getty Images
    • Soldiers pray for victims in the devastated coastal town of Otsuchi, Iwate Prefecture, on April 11 . Dennis M. Sabangan / EPA
    • A survivor in Kamaishi, Iwate prefecture, wipes away a tear after a moment of silence at 2:46 p.m. on April 11, exactly one month after the earthquake struck. Lee Jin-Man / AP
    • A group of Shinto priests, left, and Buddhist monks, right, take part in memorial prayers at Yugihama Beach in Kamakura, Kanagawa prefecture, on April 11. - Christopher Jue / EPA
    • Children play games after taking part in a moment of silence at 2:46 p.m. on April 11, exactly one month after a massive earthquake struck the area in Kamaishi, Iwate prefecture. Lee Jin-Man / AP
    • A cameraman films the warped tarmac of a road in Iwaki, Fukushima prefecture, on Monday, April 11. Earlier, a 6.6 magnitude aftershock shook the area. Masamine Kawaguchi / Yomiuri Shimbun via AP
    • Police officers man a checkpoint in Minamisoma, Fukushima prefecture, about 12 miles from the damaged Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant, on Monday, April 11. The signs read, "No entry, Entry not allowed by the special nuclear disaster legislation," right, and "Security check in operation," left. - Kyodo News via AP
    • Japan's Chief Cabinet Secretary Yukio Edano, right, eats a strawberry as comedian Shizu-chan, left, crams a tomato into her mouth at a sale of vegetables produced in the city of Iwaki in Fukushima prefecture on April 12 in Tokyo. The government is trying to support farmers in Fukushima hurting from dropped sales due to rumors of radiation spreading from the troubled nuclear power plant. Yoshikazu Tsuno / AFP - Getty Images
    • Fire and smoke are seen at a building for sampling seawater near the No.4 reactor of the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant on April 12. A fire broke out at Japan's crippled plant, operator Tokyo Electric and Power (TEPCO) said on Tuesday, but it was quickly extinguished. The Japanese government's nuclear safety agency raised the crisis level of the power plant accident from 5 to 7, the worst on the international scale and on par with Chernobyl. TEPCO via Reuters
    • Elementary school children crouch under their desks at their school in Onagawa, Miyagi prefecture on April 12, as a powerful aftershock hits northern Japan. Jiji Press via AFP - Getty Images
    • An evacuee sat in a partitioned "room" at a gymnasium converted into a shelter in Kamaishi, Iwate prefecture, on April 12, 2011, a month after the March 11 earthquake and tsunami hit the northeastern coast of Japan. (Kazuhiro Nogi/AFP/Getty Images
    • Rui Sato, 2, showed off his key chain while playing with a Japan Red Cross member at an evacuation center in Fukushima, northeastern Japan, on April 11, 2011. (Hiro Komae/Associated Press)
    • A volunteer cleaned a family photo that was washed by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami as baby photos were placed to dry at a volunteer center in Ofunato, Iwate prefecture, April 12, 2011. (Toru Hanai/Reuters
    • Shoppers looked for vegetables during a sale of produce from the city of Iwaki in Fukushima prefecture on April 12, 2011. The government is trying to support farmers in Fukushima who are hurting from dropped sales due to rumors of the spread of radiation from the troubled nuclear power plant. (Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images)
    • Kiyoi Oikawa, 74, collected water from a well with a recycled bucket to wash her clothes from her destroyed home in Minamisanriku on April 12, 2011. Japan's Prime Minister Naoto Kan said that the Fukushima nuclear plant is gradually stabilizing and that the amount of radiation being released is falling. (Yasuyoshi Chiba/AFP/Getty Images)
    • Japan's Nuclear Safety Agency official Hidehiko Nishiyama spoke during a news conference on the announcement on nuclear accident severity level in Tokyo on April 12, 2011. Japan raised the severity of its nuclear disaster to seven, the highest level, on Tuesday, putting it on a par with the world's worst disaster nuclear accident at Chernobyl after another major aftershock rattled the quake-ravaged east. (Yuriko Nakao/Reuters)
    • An employee inspected auto parts on the production line of Iwaki Diecast Co.'s plant in Yamamoto, Miyagi prefecture, Japan. Toyota Motor Corp. told US dealers that assembly disruptions triggered by last month's record earthquake and tsunami in Japan may thin supplies of vehicles into the third quarter. (Tomohiro Ohsumi/Bloomberg)
    • Japan Self-Defense Force members searched for victims in debris caused by the March 11 tsunami in Natori, Miyagi Prefecture, Japan, on April 12, 2011. (Lee Jin-man/Associated Press)
    • During an event in Tokyo to promote safety of agricultural products, a man used a radiation detector to measure the level in strawberries produced in Iwaki City, Fukushima prefecture. (Koji Sasahara/Associated Press)
    • A man was tested for contamination in Koriyama, Fukushima prefecture, northern Japan, on April 12, 2011. (Kim Kyung-Hoon/Reuters
    • A Buddhist monk prayed for earthquake victims at a burial site in Higashimatsushima, Miyagi prefecture, one month after the earthquake and tsunami struck northern Japan. Across the country people stood in silence at 2:46 p.m. local time on April 11 to remember the thousands killed. (Athit Perawongmetha/Getty Images)
    • Greenpeace activists and other environmentalists lit candles amid hundreds of paper cranes at the Heroes' Monument at suburban Quezon city, Philippines, on April 11 in solidarity to the Japanese disaster victims. The protesters are calling for an end to nuclear power around the world. (Bullit Marquez/Associated Press
    • People wearing masks and raincoats took part in an antiradioactivity rally in Seoul, South Korea, to urge the government to quickly release information about "radioactive rain" and other risks on April 12, 2011. China and South Korea have been critical of the crippled nuclear plant operator's decision to pump radioactive water into the sea, a process it has now stopped. (Jo Yong-Ha/Reuters)
    • Survivors prayed at the wreckage of a house in Natori, Miyagi prefecture, northern Japan. (Lee Jin-man/Associated Press
    • Getty Images Teru Sutou (L), 8 and his brother Ren, 9, eat a distributed hot stew and rice at a parking lot in Minamisanriku, Miyagi prefecture on April 12, 2011. Japan's Prime Minister Naoto Kan said that the tsunami-hit Fukushima nuclear plant is gradually stabilising and that the amount of radiation being released is falling..
    • A man looks for his personal belongings at a collection center for items found in the rubble of an area devastated by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, in Natori, on Tuesday, April 12. Kim Kyung-Hoon / Reuters
    • Masataka Shimizu (center), president of Tokyo Electric Power Co. , flanked by vice presidents Takashi Fujimoto and Sakae Muto, bowed during a news conference at the company's headquarters in Tokyo on April 13. The president defended the utility's response to the worst nuclear crisis since Chernobyl and pledged pay cuts as workers struggle to control radiation leaks from a crippled atomic power station. (Kiyoshi Ota/Bloomberg)
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