• Save
JAPAN -Maximum nuclear alert - march 30
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Like this? Share it with your network

Share

JAPAN -Maximum nuclear alert - march 30

on

  • 2,673 views

find the link to download this presentation on my blog : http://nubiagroup-powerpoint-collection.blogspot.com/

find the link to download this presentation on my blog : http://nubiagroup-powerpoint-collection.blogspot.com/

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,673
Views on SlideShare
2,673
Embed Views
0

Actions

Likes
1
Downloads
0
Comments
2

0 Embeds 0

No embeds

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Microsoft PowerPoint

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

JAPAN -Maximum nuclear alert - march 30 Presentation Transcript

  • 1.  
  • 2. JAPAN – 2011 march 30 High radiation found far from Japan nuke plant Atomic watchdog says the 'operational criteria for evacuation is exceeded' in village six miles outside voluntary evacuation zone PM Naoto Kan signals 'maximum alert' Japanese Prime Minister Naoto Kan has said his government is in a state of maximum alert over the crippled Fukushima nuclear plant. - Plutonium has been detected in soil at the facility and highly radioactive water has leaked from a reactor building. okyo Electric Power (Tepco) made the announcement three weeks after failing to bring reactors 1 - 4 under control. Locals would be consulted on reactors 5 and 6, which were shut down safely. The twin disasters are now known to have killed 10,901 people, with more than 17,000 people still missing across a swathe of northern Japan. On Monday highly radioactive water was found for the first time outside one of the reactor buildings at Fukushima plant. - The leak in a tunnel linked to the No 2 reactor has raised fears of radioactive liquid seeping into the environment. Plutonium - used in the fuel mix for one of the six reactors - has also been found in soil at the plant, but not at levels that threaten human health, officials say. Seawater near the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant has reached a much higher level of radiation than previously reported Regional fallout Officials in China, South Korea and the United States say they have recorded traces of radioactive material in the air. The US Environmental Protection Agency said it had detected traces of radiation in rain water in the north-east of the country. It said these were consistent with the Fukushima nuclear accident and also said they did not constitute a health hazard. Emperor Akihito visited a centre for earthquake and tsunami victims in the Tokyo area on Wednesday march 30
    • Fukushima update
    • (30 March)
    • Reactor 1: Damage to the core from cooling problems. Building holed by gas explosion. Highly radioactive water detected in reactor
    • Reactor 2: Damage to the core from cooling problems. Building holed by gas blast; containment damage suspected. Highly radioactive water detected in reactor and adjoining tunnel
    • Reactor 3: Damage to the core from cooling problems. Building holed by gas blast; containment damage possible. Spent fuel pond partly refilled with water after running low. Highly radioactive water detected in reactor
    • Reactor 4: Reactor shut down prior to quake. Fires and explosion in spent fuel pond; water level partly restored
    • Reactors 5 & 6: Reactors shut down. Temperature of spent fuel pools now lowered after rising high
  • 3. AP Photo - Japan Ground Self-Defense Force members unload boxes containing drinking water from their truck as the relief supply arrive at the village office in Iitate, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, Monday, March 21, 2011. Health Ministry advised Iitate, a village of 6,000 people about 30 kilometers (19 miles) northwest of the Fukushima Dai-ichi plant, not to drink tap water due to elevated levels of iodine. The ministry said iodine three times the normal level was detected there, about one twenty-sixth of the level of a chest X-ray in one liter of water.
  • 4. Damir Sagolj / Reuters Volunteers prepare food to be distributed to victims at a shelter for those evacuated from the disaster zone in Rikuzentakata March 23, 2011, after the area was devastated by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami.
  • 5. A man eats some fish in a can for dinner at a earthquake victims shelter March 23, 2011 in Kesennuma, Japan. March 23, 2011 in Kesennuma, Japan. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein
  • 6. An aerial photo taken by a small unmanned drone of the damaged units of Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in the town of Okuma, taken on March 24 and released March 30.. TEPCO Chairman Tsunehisa Katsumata said it will be more than a few weeks to fix the nuclear power plant. - Air Photo Service via EPA
  • 7. A U.S. Marine based in Japan directs heavy lifting equipment on Friday as reconstruction work continues at Sendai airport. Kim Kyung-Hoon / Reuters
  • 8. Rim Fujimoto, 5, holds a bottle of water at a supermarket in Tokyo on Friday. Tokyo's 13 million residents were told this week not to give tap water to babies after contamination from rain put radiation at twice the safety level. It dropped back to safe levels the next day, and the city governor cheerily drank water in front of cameras at a water purifying plant. Despite government reassurances and appeals for people not to panic, there has been a rush on bottled water. Toru Hanai / Reuters
  • 9. Damir Sagolj / Reuters - Fishermen take a break from cleaning the port devastated by a tsunami two weeks ago at the island of Oshima March 25, 2011. Through burnt ships and debris, a boat called Sunflower sails to bring food, clothing and families to isolated victims of a devastating earthquake and tsunami on Japan's Oshima Island off the northeaster Sanriku coast. For the survivors, the boat is the only connection between their island with a population of 3,200 and the city of Kesennuma on Japan's main island, which is usually 25 minutes away by ferry.
  • 10. Two residents exchange words as they are reunited two weeks after the March 11 earthquake and tsunami in a makeshift public bath set up outside a shelter by Japan Ground Self-Defense Force personnel in Yamamoto, Miyagi Prefecture on Friday. 2011- March 25 -Shuji Kajiyama / AP
  • 11. A man takes pictures of a whale museum damaged by the tsunami in Yamada town, Iwate Prefecture on Friday. 2011- march 25- Carlos Barria / Reuters
  • 12. A man throws away a TV set damaged by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami at a temporary dump site, which was converted from a baseball field, in Sendai on Saturday. March 26, 2011 Sendai city is providing five temporary dump sites to earthquake and tsunami victims, an officer from the city council said. - Kim Kyung-hoon / Reuters
  • 13. A wrecked train carriage rests over a cemetery in Onagawa, Miyagi prefecture on Saturday.- March 26, 2011 Yasuyoshi Chiba / AFP - Getty Images
  • 14. A boy plays with a basketball at a crowded makeshift evacuation center on Saturday March 26, 2011 in Rikuzentakata. – Paula Bronstein / Getty Images
  • 15. Getty Images - RIKUZENTAKATA, JAPAN- March 26, 2011 : Japanese earthquake victims enjoy a communal bath set up in tents by the Japanese Self Defense Force March 26, 2011 in Rikuzentakata, Japan. With hundreds of thousands made homeless by the quake the baths are essential since the makeshift evacuation centers have little running water. More than two weeks after the magnitude 9 earthquake and tsunami struck Japan the death toll has risen to over 10,000 dead with still thousands missing and the expectation is that it will end up well over 20,000. Presently the country is still struggling to repair a damaged nuclear power plant that has caused tremendous problems, evacuations, and now tainted water supply in the Tokyo area causing more panic buying of bottled water.
  • 16. A car hangs from a damaged building in Onagawa town, Miyagi prefecture on Saturday. March 26, 2011 - Yasuyoshi Chiba / AFP - Getty Images
  • 17. Kiyoko Kin searches through the rubble of part of her house that was washed away from the tsunami March 26, 2011 in Rikuzentakata, Japan. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein
  • 18. A Japanese mourner cries for a loved one during a mass funeral in Yamamoto, northeastern Japan Saturday, March 26, 2011, following the March 11 earthquake, tsunami and the subsequent crisis at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear complex. AP / Shuji Kajiyama
  • 19. Earthquake victims rest at a crowded makeshift evacuation center as hundreds of thousands have become homeless March 26, 2011 in Rikuzentakata, Japan. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein
  • 20. A man walks through boxes of emergency relief supplies contributed from the whole country in Onagawa town, Miyagi prefecture on Saturday. March 26, 2011 -The death toll from a massive earthquake and tsunami that devastated Japan's northeast coast topped 10,000, two weeks after the disaster struck, the National Police Agency said. - Yasuyoshi Chiba / AFP - Getty Images
  • 21. Mourners gather around victims of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami during a mass funeral in Yamamoto on Saturday. March 26, 2011 - David Guttenfelder / AP
  • 22. People look at a grounded cargo ship on a pier in Kamaishi port in Iwate Prefecture on Saturday March 26, 2011 - Koji Sasahara / AP .
  • 23. Japanese military search a collapsed building for bodies on Sunday March 27, 2011 in Kensennuma. Paula Bronstein / Getty Images
  • 24. Yukiko Umehara (C) reacts after finding her cousin's childhood diary from amongst a tsunami devastated house at Tanohata village, Iwate prefecture on Sunday. March 27, 2011 - Yasuyoshi Chiba / AFP - Getty Images
  • 25. Hiro Ono, 70, collects salvagable items in the tsunami devastated Noda village, Iwate prefecture on Sunday. March 27, 2011 Yasuyoshi Chiba / AFP - Getty Images
  • 26. Evacuees from Fukushima, where the troubled Dai-ichi nuclear power plant is located, receive meals at an evacuation center in Saitama on Sunday. March 27, 2011 - Masanobu Nakatsukasa / AP
  • 27. Reuters Pictures - A handout from Japan Ground Self-Defense Force via Kyodo shows No. 4 reactor at Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Tomioka, Fukushima Prefecture northeastern Japan March 27, 2011. The operator of Japan's stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant said on Monday a very high radiation reading that had sent workers fleeing the No. 2 reactor was erroneous. Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) vice-president Sakae Muto apologised for Sunday's error, which added to alarm inside and outside Japan over the impact of contamination from the complex which was hit by an earthquake and tsunami on March 11.
  • 28. Reuters Pictures - A handout from Japan Ground Self-Defense Force via Kyodo shows No. 4 reactor at Tokyo Electric Power Co.'s Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant in Tomioka, Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan March 27, 2011. The operator of Japan's stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant said on Monday a very high radiation reading that had sent workers fleeing the No. 2 reactor was erroneous. Tokyo Electric Power Co. (TEPCO) vice-president Sakae Muto apologised for Sunday's error, which added to alarm inside and outside Japan over the impact of contamination from the complex which was hit by an earthquake and tsunami on March 11
  • 29. Yukiko Kometa, 74 years old, stands in front of her tsunami devastated house at Noda village, Iwate prefecture on March 27, 2011. AFP/ Getty Images / Yasuyoshi Chiba
  • 30. A person stands by missing people notes taped on windows over two weeks after a magnitude-9 quake in Natori, northeastern Japan, Sunday, March 27, 2011. AP / Miho Ikeya
  • 31. Family members grieve over the coffin of Masami Takahashi during a burial service at a temporary burial site March 27, 2011 in Kensennuma, Japan. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein
  • 32. Japanese rescue teams comb the rubble looking for more bodies March 27, 2011 in Kensennuma, Japan. Getty Images / Paula Bronstein
  • 33. A Japanese woman rests in front of her damaged home in the tsunami and earthquake ravaged city of Kesennuma, northeastern Japan Sunday, March 27, 2011. AP / David Guttenfelder
  • 34. Getty Images - A protestor wears a gas mask to protest against nuclear plants in front of the Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) headquarters in Tokyo on March 27, 2011 after the company's nuclear power plant was hit by a massive earthquake and tsunami. Very high levels of radiation detected in water leaking from a reactor at a nuclear plant in Japan dealt a new setback to efforts to bring the stricken facility under control. The operator of the Fukushima Daiichi plant said it had detected radiation levels 10 million times higher than usual in leaked water at reactor two, as white steam continued to rise from the tsunami-battered facility.
  • 35. Getty Images - A protestor wears a gas mask to protest against nuclear plants in front of the Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) headquarters in Tokyo on March 27, 2011 after the company's nuclear power plant was hit by a massive earthquake and tsunami. Very high levels of radiation detected in water leaking from a reactor at a nuclear plant in Japan dealt a new setback to efforts to bring the stricken facility under control. The operator of the Fukushima Daiichi plant said it had detected radiation levels 10 million times higher than usual in leaked water at reactor two, as white steam continued to rise from the tsunami-battered facility.
  • 36. U.S. Marine Sgt. Joseph Enochs, 28, of Orlando, Fla., wakes to freezing temperatures after a night in Sendai airport's departure lounge on Saturday. With 50,000 troops stationed across the country, the U.S. military has been quick to respond to the tsunami that devastated northeast Japan. - Wally Santana / AP - March 27, 2011
  • 37. A volunteer takes a breather on Saturday March 27, 2011 while helping to clean a resident's house, which was damaged by the earthquake and tsunami in Higashi-Matsushima, in Miyagi prefecture, northern Japan. Volunteers, comprised mainly of local residents, helped clean earthquake victims' houses after the tsunami left their homes inundated with water and mud. - Yuriko Nakao / Reuters
  • 38. Damir Sagolj / Reuters - Family members of an earthquake and tsunami victim gather around an open coffin during a mass funeral at a field outside Kesennuma town, Miyagi prefecture on March 27, 2011. Desperate municipalities such as Kesennuma have been digging mass graves to bury victims of the disaster, unthinkable in a nation where the deceased are almost always cremated and their ashes placed in stone family tombs near Buddhist temples. Local regulations often prohibit the burial of bodies.
  • 39. A Japanese soldier uses a snow shovel to try and clear a street of mud in the tsunami and earthquake ravaged city of Kesennuma, northeastern Japan on Sunday. - March 27, 2011 David Guttenfelder / AP
  • 40. March 27, 2011 A pine tree stands amid the tsunami devastated area in Rikuzentakaka, Iwate Prefecture. It was the only one among tens of thousands of other pine trees forming "Takata Matsubara," or Takata seaside pine forest, which remained after the March 11 tsunami washed away all the others, local media said. AP photos
  • 41. Reiko Kikuta, right, and her husband Takeshi Kikuta stand on the port as workers attach ropes to their submerged home to try to pull it ashore on Oshima Island in northeastern Japan. - David Guttenfelder / AP
  • 42. Elementary school children share a chuckle as they reunite for the first time since the March 11 earthquake at Masuda Nishi elementary school in Natori, Miyagi Prefecture. The words on the blackboard read, "How have you been doing?" Miho Ikeya / Yomiuri Shimbun via AP
  • 43. Tokyo Metro Police officers in protective suites search for missing residents at the site of a giant tsunami triggered by the March 11 earthquake in Minamisoma, Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, Monday, March 28, 2011. AP / Takuya Yoshino
  • 44. Damir Sagolj / Reuters - Tsunami victims pass the time as their clothes dry at the shelter for those evacuated from the disaster zone in Yamada town, Iwate Prefecture in northern Japan more than two weeks after the area was devastated by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami on March 28, 2011. Japan appeared resigned on Monday to a long fight to contain the world's most dangerous atomic crisis in 25 years after high radiation levels complicated work at its crippled nuclear plant.
  • 45. A family member retrieves photographs of her missing grand father and mother's old photos amongst debris in Minamisanriku, Miyagi prefecture on March 28, 2011. AFP/ Getty Images / Yasuyoshi Chiba
  • 46. Fisherman Yutaka Watanabe sits on the roof of a destroyed house while looking for missing family members in Minamisanriku, Miyagi prefecture on March 28, 2011. AFP/ Getty Images / Yasuyoshi Chiba
  • 47. A woman uses a mobile phone on Monday as she looks at her house, which was destroyed by the earthquake and tsunami in Kessenuma town, Miyagi prefecture. - Carlos Barria / Reuters
  • 48. A teacher cries during a graduation ceremony at Ashinome kindergarten in Kessenuma, a town affected by the earthquake and tsunami, in Miyagi prefecture on March 28. One pupil and several parents from the school have been reported missing in the disaster. - Carlos Barria / Reuters
  • 49. AP Photo A notice to ask for restraining from cherry blossom viewing party is erected at Ueno Park in Tokyo Monday, March 28, 2011. The Japan Meteorological Agency said Monday that the country's capital was officially in bloom. The proclamation marks the start of Tokyo's cherry blossom viewing season and is normally among the most anticipated announcements of the season. This year, the usual excitement has been overshadowed by the aftermath of the earthquake and tsunami that devastated the northeast coast, as well as the ongoing nuclear crisis.
  • 50. Getty Images - A fishmonger prepares a bonito fish at Tokyo's Tsukiji fish market on March 28, 2011. Famous for its noisy pre-dawn tuna auctions and air of organised chaos, the market has seen sellers standing idle as demand for seafood and other food products slides amid global worries about Japanese produce after a nuclear scare. Dangerous levels of radiation detected in water thought to be leaking from a stricken Japanese reactor dealt a new setback on March 27 to efforts to avert a nuclear disaster.
  • 51. Getty Images - A fishmonger saws in half a bluefin tuna at Tokyo's Tsukiji fish market on March 28, 2011. Famous for its noisy pre-dawn tuna auctions and air of organised chaos, the market has seen sellers standing idle as demand for seafood and other food products slides amid global worries about Japanese produce after a nuclear scare. Dangerous levels of radiation detected in water thought to be leaking from a stricken Japanese reactor dealt a new setback on March 27 to efforts to avert a nuclear disaster.
  • 52. Getty Images - Frozen bluefin tuna are displayed at Tokyo's Tsukiji fish market on March 28, 2011. Famous for its noisy pre-dawn tuna auctions and air of organised chaos, the market has seen sellers standing idle as demand for seafood and other food products slides amid global worries about Japanese produce after a nuclear scare. Dangerous levels of radiation detected in water thought to be leaking from a stricken Japanese reactor dealt a new setback on March 27 to efforts to avert a nuclear disaster.
  • 53. Getty Images - Various kinds of fish are displayed at Tokyo's Tsukiji fish market on March 28, 2011. Famous for its noisy pre-dawn tuna auctions and air of organised chaos, the market has seen sellers standing idle as demand for seafood and other food products slides amid global worries about Japanese produce after a nuclear scare. Dangerous levels of radiation detected in water thought to be leaking from a stricken Japanese reactor dealt a new setback on March 27 to efforts to avert a nuclear disaster.
  • 54. Getty Images - Cherry blossoms blossom in Ueno Park in Tokyo on March 28, 2011. Japanese authorities declared the cherry blossom season open in Tokyo, six days later than last year.
  • 55. AP Photo 2 - Japanese performer chats with children evacuated from Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan, where the troubled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant is located, outside an evacuation center in Saitama, near Tokyo, Monday, March 28, 2011. The March 11 earthquake off Japan's northeast coast triggered a tsunami that barreled onshore and disabled the nuclear plant.
  • 56. AP Photo - Evacuees from Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japna, where the troubled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant is located, pick up their daily necessities at an evacuation center in Saitama, near Tokyo, Monday, March 28, 2011. The March 11 earthquake off Japan's northeast coast triggered a tsunami that barreled onshore and disabled the Fukushima nuclear plant.
  • 57. AP Photo Evacuees from Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan, where the troubled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant is located, take a rest at an evacuation center in Saitama, near Tokyo, Monday, March 28, 2011. The March 11 earthquake off Japan's northeast coast triggered a tsunami that barreled onshore and disabled the Fukushima nuclear plant.
  • 58. AP Photo - Ryota Sasaki, 10, evacuated from Minamisoma of Fukushima Prefecture, northeastern Japan, where the troubled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant is located, checks his hair through a mirror after getting his haircut at a temporary hair salon set up at an evacuation center in Saitama, near Tokyo, Monday, March 28, 2011. The March 11 earthquake off Japan's northeast coast triggered a tsunami that barreled onshore and disabled the Fukushima nuclear plant.
  • 59. A woman is tested for possible nuclear radiation exposure at an evacuation center in Koriayama, about 44 miles from the tsunami-crippled Fukushima nuclear reactor, on March 29. Plutonium has been detected in the soil at five locations at the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Tokyo Electric Power Co. said March 28. The operator of the nuclear complex said that the plutonium is believed to have been discharged from nuclear fuel at the plant, which was damaged by the devastating March 11 earthquake and tsunami. - Kim Kyung-Hoon / Reuters
  • 60. A Japanese flag is seen as two men walk through an area destroyed by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, in Taro town, Iwate prefecture on March 29. - Carlos Barria / Reuters
  • 61. A kindergarten worker pours barley tea into cups in Tokyo on March 29. According to the Tokyo Metropolitan Government on March 28, no more radioactive iodine was detected in samples of the city's water, showing that the Tokyo drinking water is now safe for infants. Nevertheless, kindergartens are still using bottled water to prepare barley tea and milk for babies. Franck Robichon / EPA
  • 62. An evacuee family carries their belongings after removing them from their destroyed home in the tsunami and earthquake ravaged city of Rikuzentakata on March 29. - David Guttenfelder / AP
  • 63. US army tech. Sgt. Raymond Decker, 320th Special Tactics Squadron, guides a C-130 cargo plane on a bike because of the lack of guidance lights and airport workers at Sendai Airport, Miyagi prefecture on March 29. - Yasuyoshi Chiba / AFP - Getty Images
  • 64. Local firefighters carry the body of 85-year-old Kotomi Murakami from her collapsed house in Rikuzentakata city, Iwate prefecture on March 29. The number of confirmed dead and people listed as missing from the earthquake and tsunami that devastated Japan's northeast coast topped 28,000, the National Police Agency said. - Toshifumi Kitamura / AFP - Getty Images
  • 65. Members of the Japan Ground Self-Defense Force pray for victims of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami at a mass grave site in Yamamoto, Miyagi Prefecture, northeastern Japan, Tuesday, March 29, 2011. AP / Eugene Hoshiko
  • 66. A relative of victim of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami cries at a mass grave site in Yamamoto, Miyagi Prefecture, northeastern Japan, Tuesday, March 29, 2011. AP / Eugene Hoshiko
  • 67. New Suzuki vehicles, destroyed by tsunami waters from the March 11 massive earthquake, are piled on the Suzuki company lot, Tuesday, March 29, 2011 in Sendai, Miyagi prefecture, Japan. AP / Wally Santana
  • 68. A survivor takes a rest at a shelter in the devastated town of Watari, Miyagi Prefecture, northeastern Japan, Tuesday, March 29, 2011. AP / Vincent Yu
  • 69. A woman looks for relics around her damaged house in Watari, northern Japan Tuesday, March 29, 2011. AP / Kyodo News
  • 70. Japanese police walk along a path through the destruction of the tsunami and earthquake ravaged city of Rikuzentakata, northeastern Japan Tuesday, March 29, 2011. AP / David Guttenfelder
  • 71. Japan Coast Guard divers inspect the wreckage of a house, washed away to the sea by the March 11 tsunami, floating in a bay in Rikuzentakata, Iwate Prefecture, Japan, Tuesday, March 29, 2011. AP / Kyodo News
  • 72. Destroyed helicopters rest at Sendai Airport, Miyagi prefecture on March 29, 2011. AFP/ Getty Images / Yasuyoshi Chiba
  • 73. Workers install a memorial post at a cemetery for victims of the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, in Kamaishi town, Iwate prefecture on March 29. The sign reads "Tohoru Great Disaster Victims Burial". - Carlos Barria / Reuters
  • 74. Getty Images - Evacuees, mainly ones who lived near the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant north of Tokyo, search through boxes of items donated by local residents at a gymnasium used at a shelter in Tokyo on March 29, 2011 following the March 11 earthquake, subsequent tsunami disaster and nuclear crisis. Japan said on March 29 the government is on 'maximum alert' over a crippled nuclear plant where highly radioactive water has halted repair work and plutonium has been found in the soil.
  • 75. Getty Images - A shopper checks the producing area of vegetables at a supermarket in Tokyo on March 29, 2011 after the government ordered a halt to shipments of certain foods following abnormal radiation levels found in products near the quake-hit nuclear plant. Growing national and international unease about the spread of radioactivity from the crippled Fukushima nuclear power plant has led to bans on the sale of produce from four prefectures.
  • 76. Getty Images - A shopper passes by piles of toilet rolls at a supermarket in Tokyo on March 29, 2011, following short supplies last week. Consumers rushed to buy toilet pepers and dry batteries as Japan has the worst nuclear accident at Tokyo Electric Power's Fukushima power plant.
  • 77. reuters Pictures - Three-year-old Mami Matsuya cries as she is being tested for possible radiation exposure at an evacuation center in Koriayama, Fukushima Prefecture, northern Japan, March 29, 2011, located about 70 km (44 miles) from the tsunami-crippled nuclear reactor. Plutonium has been detected in soil at five locations at the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Tokyo Electric Power Co. said Monday. The operator of the nuclear complex said that the plutonium is believed to have been discharged from nuclear fuel at the plant, which was damaged by the devastating March 11 earthquake and tsunami.
  • 78. Getty Images - Evacuees, mainly ones who lived near the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant north of Tokyo, spend their time in small marked out spaces on tatami mats spread out over a gymnasium floor in Tokyo on March 29, 2011 following the March 11 earthquake, subsequent tsunami disaster and nuclear crisis. Japan said on March 29 the government is on 'maximum alert' over a crippled nuclear plant where highly radioactive water has halted repair work and plutonium has been found in the soil.
  • 79. Getty Images Evacuees, mainly ones who lived near the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant north of Tokyo, spend time at a gymnasium used at a shelter in Tokyo on March 29, 2011 following the March 11 earthquake, subsequent tsunami disaster and nuclear crisis.
  • 80. Getty Images - An evacuee, part of a group who lived near the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant north of Tokyo, uses a public phone set up at a gymnasium used at a shelter in Tokyo on March 29, 2011 following the March 11 earthquake, subsequent tsunami disaster and nuclear crisis.
  • 81. Getty Images Evacuees, mainly ones who lived near the stricken Fukushima nuclear plant north of Tokyo, search through boxes of items donated by local residents at a gymnasium used at a shelter in Tokyo on March 29, 2011
  • 82. AP Photo Toyota showroom which is temporarily closed due to the March 11 earthquake and tsunami is seen in Tokyo, Japan, Tuesday, March 29, 2011. The auto industry disruptions triggered by the natural disaster will worsen in the coming weeks. Car buyers will have difficulty finding the model they want in certain colors, thousands of auto plant workers will likely be told to stay home, and companies such as Toyota, Honda and others will lose billions of dollars in revenue.
  • 83. Reuters Pictures - A man walks past a sign at the Oi thermal power station of Tokyo Electric Power Company, Inc. (TEPCO) in Tokyo in this January 26, 2009 file photo. A plan to temporarily nationalise TEPCO, the operator of the stricken nuclear plant in Fukushima, has been floated within the Japanese government, the Yomiuri newspaper said on March 29, 2011.
  • 84. A man places a board with the name of his destroyed neighborhood in Rikuzentakata, Iwate Prefecture on Tuesday, March 29 after the area was devastated by a magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami on March 11. The sign reads "Entrance to Horanosawa". Damir Sagolj / Reuters
  • 85. Reuters Pictures - A man sits inside a bar in downtown Fukushima, northern Japan March 30, 2011. Japan appeared resigned on Monday to a long fight to contain the world's most dangerous atomic crisis in 25 years after high radiation levels complicated work at its crippled nuclear plant. Engineers have been battling to control the six-reactor Fukushima complex since it was damaged by a March 11 earthquake and tsunami that also left more than 27,000 people dead or missing across Japan's devastated northeast.
  • 86. Reuters Pictures - A medical staff screens a boy for signs of nuclear radiation at an evacuation centre in Fukushima, northern Japan March 30, 2011.
  • 87. Japanese fireman place identification and location information on the remains of a victim they recovered from the rubble in Rikuzentakata in Iwate Prefecture in northeastern Japan on March 30. Stephen Morrison / EPA
  • 88. Buddhist monk Shinsho Higuchi of Saikoji temple finds out a funeral urn of one of the temple's supporters has been swept away by the tsunami as he checks the damage of at his temple's cemetery in tsunami-devastated city of Ishinomaki, Miyagi Prefecture, on March 30. - Kimimasa Mayama / EPA
  • 89. Getty Images Seven-year-old boy Daisuke Kimura enjoys a footbath to relax at a shelter in Ishinomaki in Miyagi prefecture on March 30, 2011. The number of confirmed dead and people listed as missing from the earthquake and tsunami that devastated Japan's northeast coast topped 28,000.
  • 90. AP Photo - A woman cries as she found an album of photos at the town which was burned to the ground by the March 11 earthquake and tsunami Wednesday, March 30, 2011 in Kesennuma, Miyagi Prefecture, northern Japan.
  • 91. AP Photo - People cry at the earthquake and tsunami devastated area Wednesday, March 30, 2011 in Rikuzentakata, Iwate Prefecture, northern Japan.
  • 92. AP Photo - U.S. military and Japan Ground Self-Defense Force soldiers help clean mud from tsunami floodwaters in a high school gymnasium during their joint operation, Wednesday, March 30, 2011 in Ishinomaki, northeastern Japan.
  • 93. A child is screened for dose of radiation at a village office in Iitate, northern Japan Wednesday, March 30, 2011. AP photos
  • 94. AP Photo Japan's Emperor Akihito, left, and Empress Michiko, right, talk with an evacuee at an evacuation center in Tokyo Wednesday, March 30, 2011. The imperial couple visited the shelter to encourage some 300 evacuees from the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, mostly from Fukushima Prefecture where the troubled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant is located.
  • 95. Issei Kato / AP - Japan's Emperor Akihito , left, and Empress Michiko talk with evacuees, right, at a shelter in Tokyo on March 30. The Emperor and Empress visited the shelter to encourage some 300 evacuees from the March 11 earthquake and tsunami, mostly from Fukushima Prefecture where the troubled Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant is located.
  • 96. Tokyo Electric Power Co., (TEPCO) Chairman Tsunehisa Katsumata, center, and others bow before a news conference at the company's head office in Tokyo, Wednesday, March 30. The president of the utility that owns Japan's tsunami-damaged nuclear complex was hospitalized with hypertension as setbacks mounted at the plant, where experts Wednesday logged the highest radiation yet in nearby seawater. - Itsuo Inouye / AP
  • 97. Getty Images Tokyo Electric Power Co. chairman Tsunehisa Katsumata answers questions during a press conferecne at the company's headquarters in Tokyo on March 30, 2011. Katsumata took the press conference on behalf of under-fire company president Masataka Shimizu who was hospitalised with high blood pressure, dizziness and fatigue.
  • 98. Yoshikazu Tsuno / AFP - Getty Images- Japanese civic group members hold placards to protest against Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) over the nuclear leakage at the comnpany's Fukushima nuclear power plant, following the 9.0-magnitude earthquake and tsunami outside the TEPCO headquarters in Tokyo on March 30, 2011. Japan was considering plans to drape shattered nuclear reactor buildings with special covers to limit radiation, and pump contaminated water into a tanker anchored offshor
  • 99. Getty Images A Japanese civic group member holds a placard to protest against Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) over the nuclear leakage at the comnpany's Fukushima nuclear power plant, following the 9.0-magnitude earthquake and tsunami outside the TEPCO headquarters in Tokyo on March 30, 2011. Japan was considering plans to drape shattered nuclear reactor buildings with special covers to limit radiation, and pump contaminated water into a tanker anchored offshore.
  • 100. Getty Images A Japanese civic group member holds a placard to protest against Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) over the nuclear leakage at the comnpany's Fukushima nuclear power plant, following the 9.0-magnitude earthquake and tsunami outside the TEPCO headquarters in Tokyo on March 30, 2011. Japan was considering plans to drape shattered nuclear reactor buildings with special covers to limit radiation, and pump contaminated water into a tanker anchored offshore.
  • 101. Getty Images - A protestor wears a gas mask to protest against nuclear plants in front of the Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) headquarters in Tokyo on March 27, 2011 after the company's nuclear power plant was hit by a massive earthquake and tsunami. Very high levels of radiation detected in water leaking from a reactor at a nuclear plant in Japan dealt a new setback to efforts to bring the stricken facility under control. The operator of the Fukushima Daiichi plant said it had detected radiation levels 10 million times higher than usual in leaked water at reactor two, as white steam continued to rise from the tsunami-battered facility.
  • 102. Getty Images - Demonstrators gather to protest against nuclear plants in front of the Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) headquarters in Tokyo on March 27, 2011 after the company's nuclear power plant was hit by a massive earthquake and tsunami. Very high levels of radiation detected in water leaking from a reactor at a nuclear plant in Japan dealt a new setback to efforts to bring the stricken facility under control. The operator of the Fukushima Daiichi plant said it had detected radiation levels 10 million times higher than usual in leaked water at reactor two, as white steam continued to rise from the tsunami-battered facility.
  • 103. Getty Images - A protestor wears a gas mask to protest against nuclear plants in front of the Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) headquarters in Tokyo on March 27, 2011 after the company's nuclear power plant was hit by a massive earthquake and tsunami. Very high levels of radiation detected in water leaking from a reactor at a nuclear plant in Japan dealt a new setback to efforts to bring the stricken facility under control. The operator of the Fukushima Daiichi plant said it had detected radiation levels 10 million times higher than usual in leaked water at reactor two, as white steam continued to rise from the tsunami-battered facility.
  • 104. Getty Images - A protestor wears a gas mask to protest against nuclear plants in front of the Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) headquarters in Tokyo on March 27, 2011 after the company's nuclear power plant was hit by a massive earthquake and tsunami. Very high levels of radiation detected in water leaking from a reactor at a nuclear plant in Japan dealt a new setback to efforts to bring the stricken facility under control. The operator of the Fukushima Daiichi plant said it had detected radiation levels 10 million times higher than usual in leaked water at reactor two, as white steam continued to rise from the tsunami-battered facility.
  • 105. Getty Images - Demonstrators gather to protest against nuclear plants in front of the Tokyo Electric Power Co (TEPCO) headquarters in Tokyo on March 27, 2011 after the company's nuclear power plant was hit by a massive earthquake and tsunami. Very high levels of radiation detected in water leaking from a reactor at a nuclear plant in Japan dealt a new setback to efforts to bring the stricken facility under control. The operator of the Fukushima Daiichi plant said it had detected radiation levels 10 million times higher than usual in leaked water at reactor two, as white steam continued to rise from the tsunami-battered facility.
  • 106. Getty Images - Chinese President Hu Jintao (R) welcomes his French counterpart Nicolas Sarkozy (C) and France Finance and Economy Minister Christine Lagarde (L) for a working meeting at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing on March 30, 2011. Sarkozy arrived in China on March 30 at the start of an Asian mini-tour that will include a G20 seminar on the world monetary system and a stop in disaster-struck Japan.
  • 107. Getty Images - French President Nicolas Sarkozy delivers a speech to the french community at the new French embassy in Beijing on March 30, 2011. Sarkozy arrived in China on March 30 at the start of an Asian mini-tour that will include a G20 seminar on the world monetary system and a stop in disaster-struck Japan.
  • 108. A presentation by Nubia [email_address] http://nubiagroup-powerpoint-collection.blogspot.com/ http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Nubia_group_Powerpoint_Collection/