• Save
Flood Emergency in Pakistan is Not Over (PDF)
Upcoming SlideShare
Loading in...5
×
 

Flood Emergency in Pakistan is Not Over (PDF)

on

  • 2,990 views

find the llink to download on my blog : http://nubiagroup-powerpoint-collection.blogspot.fr/

find the llink to download on my blog : http://nubiagroup-powerpoint-collection.blogspot.fr/

Statistics

Views

Total Views
2,990
Views on SlideShare
2,733
Embed Views
257

Actions

Likes
3
Downloads
2
Comments
4

15 Embeds 257

http://hardys-corner.blogspot.fr 154
http://xeniagreekmuslimah.wordpress.com 34
http://islamicreflections1.wordpress.com 12
http://hardys-corner.blogspot.ca 10
http://hardys-corner.blogspot.be 10
http://hardys-corner.blogspot.com 10
http://blogtest0157.blogspot.fr 7
http://hardys-corner.blogspot.com.es 6
http://hardys-corner.blogspot.com.br 4
http://hardys-corner.blogspot.ro 3
http://hardys-corner.blogspot.ch 2
http://hardys-corner.blogspot.hu 2
http://hardys-corner.blogspot.it 1
http://hardys-corner.blogspot.de 1
http://hardys-corner.blogspot.gr 1
More...

Accessibility

Categories

Upload Details

Uploaded via as Adobe PDF

Usage Rights

© All Rights Reserved

Report content

Flagged as inappropriate Flag as inappropriate
Flag as inappropriate

Select your reason for flagging this presentation as inappropriate.

Cancel
  • Full Name Full Name Comment goes here.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • dear yes you are right i intentionally aded this mention '
    «Please Donate to Non-Governmental and non-extremist organisations.»' -
    because help is needed by the population and if we give other way we will never be sure that the population will see the benefit of what we give !

    Thank you all for your support and good heart
    really this cause deserve a lot of efforts !
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • Thank you for sharing this appeal to the generosity of the world. I couldn’t avoid noticing the 'advise' in the first slide: «Please Donate to Non-Governmental and non-extremist organisations.» Yes, it’s sad, but there are people capable even of taking advantage from the others suffering. Friendly greetings from Portugal.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • The world, horrified by the disaster, did respond with urgency to help the victims of the tragedy. However the Pakistanis still have to rely on the generosity and humanitarian efforts of other countries and individual donors to provide sustenance and hope. LET US NOT IGNORE THIS PLEA.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
  • One of our organisations in Australia has raised 3 million dollars for Pakistan . I heard that on Thursday. All your efforts to keep us on track are not lost. Merci pour le partage et merci pour votre coeur.
    Are you sure you want to
    Your message goes here
    Processing…
Post Comment
Edit your comment

Flood Emergency in Pakistan is Not Over (PDF) Flood Emergency in Pakistan is Not Over (PDF) Presentation Transcript

  • Flood Emergency in Pakistan Not Over 1 million people didn’t received any help of any sort. PLEASE DONATE to Non-Governemental and non-extremist organisations
  • Devastation in Pakistan. 1 million people didn’t received any help of any sort. Flood Emergency in Pakistan is Not Over More than 3 million people have yet to receive desperately needed food aid, according to the U.N., and the nearly 1 million people didn’t received any help of any sort ! They have no water and no food, and need medecines ! Financial response to Pakistan floods is not enough The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees is urging the international community not to turn its attention away from the crisis in flood-stricken Pakistan.  The UNHCR says the emergency is far from over and the survivors of these catastrophic floods will be in need of aid for a long time. 30 august :UNHCR Goodwill Ambassador Angelina Jolie has appealed for greater public support for efforts to provide humanitarian relief to the millions of people whose lives have been devastated by the floods inundating much of Pakistan. In a video message released today, the actress points to the sheer scale of the disaster. "One-fifth of Pakistan is under water. and the threat of disease now looms for 20 million affected people. This is not just a humanitarian crisis, it is an economic and social catastrophe. UNHCR is on the ground. The more support we can give, the greater number of tents, food, clean water and medicine will get to the people in need," she says. At the outbreak of the current crisis she donated US$100,000 to the agency for its assistance work in the country. If you didn’t already donate,Please donate now and help save the lives of children in Pakistan.  
  • Pakistani children who survives heavy flooding are covered with flies as they live in miserable conditions at a roadside in Nowshera near Pesharwar, Pakistan on Tuesday, Aug. 31, 2010. Floodwaters that have devastated Pakistan for five weeks headed to the Arabian Sea on Tuesday after swallowing two final towns, but the challenges of delivering emergency aid to 8 million people remained.(AP Photo/Mohammad Sajjad)
  • Pakistani displaced by flooding reach for food aid given by volunteer along main road near Marli, Sindh province, southern Pakistan on Tuesday, Aug. 31, 2010. Floodwaters that have devastated Pakistan for five weeks headed to the Arabian Sea on Tuesday after swallowing two final towns, but the challenges of delivering emergency aid to 8 million people remained. (AP Photo/Vincent Thian)
  • Pakistani flood survivors look into a tent to get relief in a camp setup for displaced people in Hyderabad, Pakistan, Tuesday, Aug. 31, 2010. Floodwaters that have devastated Pakistan for five weeks headed to the Arabian Sea on Tuesday after swallowing two final towns, but the challenges of delivering emergency aid to 8 million people remained. (AP Photo/Pervez Masih)
  • A girl listens to her friend as she attends a makeshift school run by UNICEF in a camp for flood-affected people in Sukkur, Pakistan on Tuesday, Aug. 31, 2010. Floodwaters that have devastated Pakistan for five weeks headed to the Arabian Sea on Tuesday after swallowing two final towns, but the challenges of delivering emergency aid to 8 million people remained. (AP Photo/Anjum Naveed)
  • A woman covers daughter Afsana Din, who is suffering diarrhea, as she waits for her turn at a medial camp for flood-affected people in Sukkur, Pakistan on Tuesday, Aug. 31, 2010. Floodwaters that have devastated Pakistan for five weeks headed to the Arabian Sea on Tuesday after swallowing two final towns, but the challenges of delivering emergency aid to 8 million people remained. (AP Photo/Anjum Naveed)
  • Pakistani flood affected victims struggle for water from a water tanker in Thatta in southern Sindh province on August 30, 2010. A torrent of water threatening to deluge a city in flood-hit Pakistan has begun to recede, officials said, as emergency workers plugged a breach in defences against the swollen Indus river. Pakistani troops and workers were on a "war footing" over the weekend battling to save the southern city of Thatta after most of the 300,000 population fled the advancing waters. TOPSHOTS / AFP PHOTO / ASIF HASSAN (Photo credit should read ASIF HASSAN/AFP/Getty Images)
  • Reuters Pictures A mother holds her sick child as flood victims wait to receive medical help at a hospital in Sukkur, in Pakistan's Sindh province September 1, 2010. Victims of Pakistan's floods queued at hospitals where scant resources were available to treat a rising number of patients. Aid agencies fear disease, food shortages and malnutrition may create new crises as people head back to their shattered towns and villages to rebuild their homes and lives.
  • Families wait for relief at a camp in Nowshera, Pakistan (seen on August 3).Extreme events such as heat waves, drought, and monsoon floods are believed by some scientists to be increasing with global warming, and the disasters in Russia and Pakistan may be indications of this, Rosanne D'Arrigo, a research professor at Columbia University's Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory, said in an email to National Geographic News in July.
  • Waiting for Food A girl displaced from a flooded areas waits for relief in a camp in Photograph by Tim Wimborne, Reuters Jatti, near Thatta, Sindh province, Pakistan on 02 September 2010. Flood refugees wait for food near Nowshera, Pakistan, on August 23. The U.S. has committed to $200 million of the $800 million in relief fund The United Nations has warned, that up to 3.5 million children were at risk from water-borne diseases in flood-hit Pakistan and said it was already collected, according to Reuters news service. preparing to deal with thousands of potential cholera cases. But by some estimates, rebuilding could cost up to $15 billion. EPA/REHAN KHAN Published August 27, 2010
  • A displaced woman who survived the floods with her family gestures as rains soaked her belongings at a roadside in Thatta, Pakistan on Wednesday, Sept. 1, 2010. (AP Photo/Shakil Adil)
  • A Pakistan barber cuts the beard of his fellow displaced person on a makehift barbershop at a camp for people displaced by floods in Muzaffargarh district, Punjab province, Pakistan on Wednesday Sept. 1, 2010. The floods have receded in parts of north and central Pakistan but are continuing in the south. The waters are expected to remain for several weeks, prolonging the misery of millions desperate to return home and rebuild their lives. (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
  • A young boy drinks water from a standpipe at a camp for people displaced by the floods near Sukkur, Pakistan, Wednesday Sept. 1, 2010, during a visit by Britain's Deputy Prime Minister Nick Clegg. Speaking after being shown aid camps near Sukkur - one of the worst affected regions - Clegg warned that flood-hit Pakistan will need aid for years to come.(AP Photo/Andrew Winning, pool)
  • Pakistani internally displaced people (IDPs), not on the list at a temporary camp organized by Pakistan's Air Force, demand food in Sukkur on September 1, 2010. The World Food Programme on August 31, warned that flood-ravaged Pakistan faced a "triple threat" after the worst disaster in the country's history left eight million people dependent on aid to survive. Torrential monsoon rains triggered massive floods that have moved steadily from north to south over the past month, engulfing a fifth of the volatile country and affecting 17 million of Pakistan's 167 million people. TOPSHOTS AFP PHOTO / ADEK BERRY (Photo credit should read ADEK BERRY/AFP/Getty Images)
  • Internally displaced Pakistani woman Zainab cradles her fifteen-day old twins Belawal (L) and Marwi (R) in Sukkur on September 2, 2010. Relief efforts in flood-ravaged Pakistan are being stretched by the "unprecedented scale" of the disaster, while funding has almost stalled, the UN said on September 2. Torrential monsoon rains triggered massive floods that have moved steadily from north to south over the past month, engulfing a fifth of the volatile country and affecting 17 million of Pakistan's 167 million people. TOPSHOTS/AFP PHOTO / ADEK BERRY (Photo credit should read ADEK BERRY/AFP/Getty Images)
  • Internally displaced Pakistani women wait for relief goods provided by theSaudi based International Islamic Relief, in Larkana on September 3, 2010.Fresh floods in southern Pakistan are snaring at least a million people displaced by earlier flooding, adding to the huge problems faced by theunderfunded relief effort, UN aid agencies warned. A month after monsoon striggered catastrophic flooding throughout the country, submerging an areathe size of England, eight million remain dependent on handouts for theirsurvival, which they say are too slow coming. TOPSHOTS/AFP PHOTO / ADEKBERRY (Photo credit should read ADEK BERRY/AFP/Getty Images)
  • People lead their cattle as they flee a flooded area in Jatti, near Thatta,Sindh province, Pakistan, on 02 September 2010. The United Nations haswarned, that up to 3.5 million children were at risk from water-borne diseases in flood-hit Pakistan and said it was preparing to deal with thousands of potential cholera cases. EPA/REHAN KHAN
  • A girl displaced from a flooded areas waits for relief in a camp in Larkana,Sindh province Pakistan on 04 September 2010. The United Nations warned on16 August, that up to 3.5 million children were at risk from water-borne diseases in flood-hit Pakistan and said it was bracing to deal witht housands of potential cholera cases. More than 1,500 people across Pakistan have been killed and hundreds of thousands stranded due to flash flood striggered by the ongoing spell of monso on rains. EPA/FAWAD HUSSEIN
  • A girl displaced from flooded areas lives on a roadside in Basera, near Muzaffargarh, Punjab province, Pakistan on 02 September 2010. The United Nations has warned, that up to 3.5 million children were at risk from water-borne diseases in flood-hit Pakistan and said it was preparing to deal with thousands of potential cholera cases. EPA/SHABBIR HUSSEIN IMAM
  • People displaced from flooded areas wade through high waters towards higher grounds in Basera, near Muzaffargarh, Punjab province, Pakistan on 02September 2010. The United Nations has warned that up to 3.5 million children were at risk from water-borne diseases in flood-hit Pakistan andsaid it was preparing to deal with thousands of potential cholera cases.EPA/SHABBIR HUSSEIN IMAM
  • A woman gets medical treatment at a camp for flood victims in Larkana, Sindh province Pakistan on 04 September 2010. The United Nations warned on 16 August, that up to 3.5 million children were at risk from water-borne diseases in flood-hit Pakistan and said it was bracing to deal with thousands of potential cholera cases. More than 1,500 people across Pakistan have been killed and hundreds of thousands stranded due to flash floods triggered by the ongoing spell of monsoon rains. EPA/FAWAD HUSSEIN
  • A general view of a tent camp for flood victims in Larkana, Sindh province Pakistan on 04 September 2010. The United Nations warned on 16 August, that up to 3.5 million children were at risk from water-borne diseases in flood-hit Pakistan and said it was bracing to deal with thousands of potential cholera cases. More than 1,500 people across Pakistan have been killed and hundreds of thousands stranded due to flash floods triggered by the ongoing spell of monsoon rains. EPA/FAWAD HUSSEIN
  • A woman with their children displaced from a flooded areas wait for relief in a camp in Larkana, Sindh province Pakistan on 04 September 2010. The United Nations warned on 16 August, that up to 3.5 million children were at risk from water-borne diseases in flood-hit Pakistan and said it was bracing to deal with thousands of potential cholera cases. More than 1,500 people across Pakistan have been killed and hundreds of thousands stranded due to flash floods triggered by the ongoing spell of monsoon rains. EPA/FAWAD HUSSEIN
  • Child displaced from a flooded areas take rest in a camp in Larkana, Sindh province Pakistan on 04 September 2010. The United Nations warned on 16 August, that up to 3.5 million children were at risk from water-borne diseases in flood-hit Pakistan and said it was bracing to deal with thousands of potential cholera cases. More than 1,500 people across Pakistan have been killed and hundreds of thousands stranded due to flash floods triggered by the ongoing spell of monsoon rains. EPA/FAWAD HUSSEIN
  • Children displaced from a flooded areas take bath in a camp in Larkana, Sindh province Pakistan on 04 September 2010. The United Nations warned on 16 August, that up to 3.5 million children were at risk from water-borne diseases in flood-hit Pakistan and said it was bracing to deal with thousands of potential cholera cases. More than 1,500 people across Pakistan have been killed and hundreds of thousands stranded due to flash floods triggered by the ongoing spell of monsoon rains. EPA/FAWAD HUSSEIN
  • Amira, 2, a flood victim suffering from skin and stomach problems, cries at a hospital in Sukkur, in Pakistan's Sindh province September 1, 2010 REUTERS/Damir Sagolj
  • Old Pakistani man lies on his rope bed An old Pakistani man lies on his rope bed as he waits for relief goods at a camp for displaced people in Muzaffargarh district, Punjab province, Pakistan on Wednesday Sept. 1, 2010. The floods have receded in parts of north and central Pakistan but are continuing in the south. The waters are expected to remain for several weeks, prolonging the misery of millions desperate to return home and rebuild their lives (AP Photo/Aaron Favila)
  • A man believed to be more than 80 years old lies on a bed after being stranded in water for a week, according to locals, in Garhi Khairo, Sindh province.
  • A Pakistani mother moves to safer area with her child in Dadu near Hyderabad, Sindh province, Pakistan Image Credit: AP
  • People walk in a flooded area of Sajawal near on Wednesday. The UN has warned of imminent waterborne diseases, including typhoid fever, shigellosis and hepatitis. Image Credit: Reuters
  • Flies fly around a sick girl at the relief camp set up for victims in Sukkur, Sindh province, on Tuesday. Image Credit: Reuters
  • A woman mourns the death of her relative who died after a house collapsed due to heavy floodwaters in Lundi village near Karampur on Wednesday. Image Credit: AP
  • Female flood victims carrying their children on their shoulders along with an elderly man walk through floodwaters as they return to their villages in Shikarpur. Image Credit: Reuters
  • Children attend a makeshift school run by Unicef in a camp for flood-affected people in Sukkur. Image Credit: AP
  • A child cries on Monday in a camp set up for people displaced by the floods in Thatta. Thousands of people streamed back to the historic southern city where new levees hastily built from clay and stone held back flood waters. Image Credit: AP
  • A list of humanitarian organisations that are accepting cash donations for flood response efforts in Pakistan can be found at http://www.interaction.org/crisis-list/interaction-members-respond-floods-pakistan You can also contribute to flood relief in Pakistan through one of these organizations (listed in alphabetical order): APPNA Central Asia Institute The Citizens Foundation Developments in Literacy Doctors of The World Edhi Foundation Human Development Foundation THEY NEED Humanity First IMANA OUR HELP : Islamic Relief USA Medecins sans Frontiere PLEASE DONATE Relief International Red Cross Pakistan SHINE Humanity UNICEF  
  • A presentation by Nubia Nubia_group@yahoo.fr Some of your priotities can wait one month – These kids maybe will not be there anymore in one month – make them your priorities – DONATE